Sioux language

SiouxDakotaSiouan languages (Dakota/Sioux)Dakota SiouxDakotanDakʰótaLakotalanguage of the Sioux nationSiouanSioux dialect
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.wikipedia
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Assiniboine language

AssiniboineasbAssiniboine (Nakona or A' M̆oqazh)
Closely related to the Sioux language are the Assiniboine and Stoney languages, whose speakers use the self-designation term (autonym) Nakhóta or Nakhóda.
Along with the closely related Stoney, Assiniboine is an n variety of the Dakotan languages, meaning its autonym is pronounced with an initial n (thus: Nakʰóta as opposed to Dakʰóta or Lakʰóta, and Nakʰóda or Nakʰóna as opposed to Dakʰód or Lakʰól). The Assiniboine language is also closely related to the Sioux language and to the Stoney language (likewise called Nakoda or Nakota), although they are hardly mutually intelligible.

Lakota language

LakotaLakhotaStandard Lakota Orthography
1) Lakota ( Lakȟóta, Teton, Teton Sioux)
Though generally taught and considered by speakers as a separate language, Lakota is mutually intelligible with the other two languages (such as Dakota language), and is considered by most linguists as one of the three major varieties of the Sioux language.

Dakota language

DakotaWestern DakotaDakota Sioux
2) Western Dakota ( Yankton-Yanktonai or Dakȟóta, and erroneously classified, for a very long time, as "Nakota" )
For a comparative table of the various writing systems conceived over time for the Sioux languages, cf. the specific section of the article Sioux language.

Sioux

DakotaDakota SiouxSiouan
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.

Stoney language

StoneyNakodaNakoda (Stoney) language
Closely related to the Sioux language are the Assiniboine and Stoney languages, whose speakers use the self-designation term (autonym) Nakhóta or Nakhóda.
The following table shows some of the main phonetic differences between Stoney, Assiniboine, and the three dialects (Lakota, Yankton-Yanktonai and Santee-Sisseton) of Sioux.

Siouan languages

SiouanSiouan languageSiouan-speaking
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.
The Western Siouan languages can be divided into Missouri River languages (such as Crow and Hidatsa), Mandan, Mississippi River languages (such as Dakotan, Chiwere-Winnebago, and Dhegihan languages), and Ohio Valley Siouan branches.

Indigenous languages of the Americas

indigenous languagesNative American languagesNative American
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.

Navajo language

NavajoMode and Aspectnav
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.

Cree language

CreeCree-Montagnaislanguage
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.

Inuit languages

InuitInuit languageInuktitut
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.

Ojibwe language

OjibweOjibwaAnishinaabe
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.

Variety (linguistics)

varietiesvarietylect
Sioux has three major regional varieties, with other sub-varieties:

Nakota

NakodaNakota or Nakodapeople
2) Western Dakota ( Yankton-Yanktonai or Dakȟóta, and erroneously classified, for a very long time, as "Nakota" )

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Life for the Dakota changed significantly in the nineteenth century as the early years brought increased contact with white settlers, particularly Christian missionaries.

Missionary

missionariesmissionary workmission
Life for the Dakota changed significantly in the nineteenth century as the early years brought increased contact with white settlers, particularly Christian missionaries.

Stephen Return Riggs

Stephen Riggs
In 1836, brothers Samuel and Gideon Pond, Rev. Stephen Return Riggs, and Dr. Thomas Williamson set out to begin translating hymns and Bible stories into Dakota.

Bible

biblicalScripturethe Bible
In 1836, brothers Samuel and Gideon Pond, Rev. Stephen Return Riggs, and Dr. Thomas Williamson set out to begin translating hymns and Bible stories into Dakota.

Pictionary

board gameboard game of the same name
Traditional stories have been translated, children's books, even games such as Pictionary and Scrabble.

Scrabble

Scrabble gameblankComputer players of Scrabble
Traditional stories have been translated, children's books, even games such as Pictionary and Scrabble.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
Since the 1900s, professional linguists have been creating their own versions of the orthography.

Orthography

orthographicorthographiesorthographically
Since the 1900s, professional linguists have been creating their own versions of the orthography.

Latin alphabet

LatinRomanLatin letters
Prior to the introduction of the Latin alphabet, the Dakota did have a writing system of their own: one of representational pictographs.

Pictogram

pictographpictographspictograms
Prior to the introduction of the Latin alphabet, the Dakota did have a writing system of their own: one of representational pictographs.

Bloody Knife

Bloody Knife (Sioux:Tȟamila Wewe; Arikara: NeesiRAhpát; ca. 1840 – June 25, 1876) was an American Indian who served as a scout and guide for the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment.