Sioux languagewikipedia
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.
SiouxDakotaSiouan languages (Dakota/Sioux)DakʰótaSiouanDakotanDakota SiouxSioux-languageLakotaSioux dialect

Siouan languages

SiouanSiouan languageSiouan-speaking
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.
The Western Siouan languages can be divided into Missouri River languages (such as Crow and Hidatsa), Mandan, Mississippi River languages (such as Dakotan, Chiwere-Winnebago, and Dhegihan languages), and Ohio Valley Siouan branches.

Lakota language

LakotaLakhotaStandard Lakota Orthography
See Lakota sound system and Dakota sound system.
Though generally taught and considered by speakers as a separate language, Lakota is mutually intelligible with the other two languages (such as Dakota language), and is considered by most linguists as one of the three major varieties of the Sioux language.

Assiniboine language

AssiniboineAssiniboine (Nakona or A' M̆oqazh)asb
Closely related to the Sioux language are the Assiniboine and Stoney languages, whose speakers use the self-designation term (autonym) Nakhóta or Nakhóda.
Along with the closely related Stoney, Assiniboine is an n variety of the Dakotan languages, meaning its autonym is pronounced with an initial n (thus: Nakʰóta as opposed to Dakʰóta or Lakʰóta, and Nakʰóda or Nakʰóna as opposed to Dakʰód or Lakʰól).

Dakota language

DakotaWestern DakotaDakota Sioux
See Lakota sound system and Dakota sound system.
For a comparative table of the various writing systems conceived over time for the Sioux languages, cf. the specific section of the article Sioux language.

Stoney language

StoneyNakodaNakota
Closely related to the Sioux language are the Assiniboine and Stoney languages, whose speakers use the self-designation term (autonym) Nakhóta or Nakhóda.
The following table shows some of the main phonetic differences between Stoney, Assiniboine, and the three dialects (Lakota, Yankton-Yanktonai and Santee-Sisseton) of Sioux.

South Dakota

SDSouth DakotaState of South Dakota
2.06% (15,292) of the population spoke Spanish, 1.39% (10,282) spoke Dakota, and 1.37% (10,140) spoke German.

Sioux

DakotaSiouxSiouan
Sioux is a Siouan language spoken by over 30,000 Sioux in the United States and Canada, making it the fifth most spoken indigenous language in the United States or Canada, behind Navajo, Cree, Inuit languages and Ojibwe.

Bloody Knife

Bloody Knife (Sioux:Tȟamila Wewe; Arikara: NeesiRAhpát; ca. 1840 – June 25, 1876) was an American Indian who served as a scout and guide for the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment.

Ekgmowechashala

Ekgmowechashala zancanellai
Ekgmowechashala (Sioux: "little cat man" or "little fox man" ) is an extinct genus of primate belonging to Adapiformes.

Minneapolis

MinneapolisMinneapolis, MinnesotaMinneapolis, MN
The name Minneapolis is attributed to Charles Hoag, the city's first schoolmaster, who combined mni, a Dakota Sioux word for water, and polis, the Greek word for city.

List of place names in Canada of Indigenous origin

Many places in CanadaList of First Nations place names in CanadaList of Canadian place names of Indigenous origin

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

Minnehaha CountyMinnehaha
Its name was derived from the Sioux word Mnihaha, meaning "rapid water," or "waterfall" (often also incorrectly translated as "laughing water").

Minnehaha

Minnehaha
The name, often said to mean "laughing water", literally translates to "waterfall" or "rapid water" in Dakota.

Hunkpapa

HúŋkpapȟaHunkpapa LakotaHunkpappa
They speak Lakȟóta, one of the three dialects of the Sioux language.

Thomas Wakeman

Wowinapa
Thomas Wakeman (Sioux: Wowinape) (1846 – January 13, 1886) was a Native American who organized the first Sioux Indian YMCA.

Culture of the United States

American cultureAmericanculture of the United States
The most common native languages include Samoan, Hawaiian, Navajo language, Cherokee, Sioux, and a spectrum of Inuit languages.

Cokato Township, Wright County, Minnesota

Cokato TownshipCokato Township, MinnesotaCokato
Cokato Township was organized in 1868, and named for the Sioux language word meaning "at the middle".

Dakota people

DakotaYanktonSantee
This is referred to as a common language, Dakota-Lakota, or Sioux.

Mahpiya Ska

Mahpiya Ska (Sioux language) or White Cloud (July 10, 1996 - November 14, 2016) was an albino female buffalo primarily residing at the National Buffalo Museum located in Jamestown, North Dakota.

Margaret Manton Merrill

She stayed in journalism for twelve years, where her noted successes were in the line of stories for children, while she likewise made translations from such diverse languages as Scandinavian and Sioux.

Wawota

Wasioja Township, Dodge County, Minnesota

Wasioja TownshipWasiojaWasioja, Minnesota
Wasioja is the native Sioux language name for the Zumbro River.