Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet

Charles FergussonSir Charles FergussonGeneral Sir Charles FergussonFergussonLieutenant General Sir Charles Ferguson General '''Sir Charles Fergusson''', Bart. C. FergussonCharlesCharles Fergusson, 7th BaronetSir Charles Fergusson of Kilkerran, 7th Bt
General Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet, (17 January 1865 – 20 February 1951) was a British Army officer and the third Governor-General of New Zealand.wikipedia
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List of governors-general of New Zealand

Governor-General of New Zealand14th Governor-General of New ZealandGovernor of New Zealand
General Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet, (17 January 1865 – 20 February 1951) was a British Army officer and the third Governor-General of New Zealand. Fergusson was the son of Sir James Fergusson, 6th Baronet, the 6th Governor of New Zealand.

Sir James Fergusson, 6th Baronet

Sir James FergussonJames FergussonSir James Fergusson, Bt
Fergusson was the son of Sir James Fergusson, 6th Baronet, the 6th Governor of New Zealand. His father, Sir James Fergusson, had served as a Governor of New Zealand, and his son Lord Ballantrae was the tenth and last British-appointed governor-general.
Fergusson's son Charles and grandson Bernard Fergusson both became Governors-General of New Zealand.

Bernard Fergusson, Baron Ballantrae

Bernard FergussonSir Bernard FergussonBrigadier Sir Bernard Fergusson
His father, Sir James Fergusson, had served as a Governor of New Zealand, and his son Lord Ballantrae was the tenth and last British-appointed governor-general.
Fergusson was born on 6 May 1911, the third son and fourth child of Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet and his wife Lady Alice Mary Boyle, a daughter of David Boyle, 7th Earl of Glasgow.

Royal Military College, Sandhurst

Royal Military CollegeSandhurstRoyal Military College Sandhurst
He was educated at Eton College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, before joining the Grenadier Guards in 1883.

Sir James Fergusson, 8th Baronet

Sir James FergussonSir James Fergusson of Kilkerran, 8th Baronet
Fergusson was born in Dailly in Ayrshire on 18 September 1904 the son of Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet of Kilkerran and his wife Lady Alice Mary Boyle, daughter of Lord David Boyle, 7th Earl of Glasgow.

Curragh incident

Curragh MutinyCurragh incident mutinychose to resign
He was appointed Inspector of Infantry in 1909 and General Officer Commanding 5th Division in Ireland in 1913 – in this capacity he played a key role during the Curragh incident, ensuring his officers obeyed orders.
It was later suggested (a claim believed by Sir James Fergusson, Charles Fergusson's son) that the move to deploy troops may have been a "plot" by Churchill and Seely to goad the loyalists into a rebellion which would then be put down, although this view is not universally held.

XVII Corps (United Kingdom)

XVII CorpsBritish XVII CorpsXVII
He commanded II Corps from January 1915 and then, from May 1916, XVII Corps, which he led until the end of the war.

9th (Scottish) Division

9th Division9th Scottish Division9th
He took the 5th Division to France in August 1914 at the start of the First World War, and then briefly took command of the 9th (Scottish) Division from October to December 1914.

5th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

5th Division5th Infantry DivisionBritish 5th Infantry Division
He was appointed Inspector of Infantry in 1909 and General Officer Commanding 5th Division in Ireland in 1913 – in this capacity he played a key role during the Curragh incident, ensuring his officers obeyed orders.

II Corps (United Kingdom)

II Corps2nd Army CorpsBritish II Corps
He commanded II Corps from January 1915 and then, from May 1916, XVII Corps, which he led until the end of the war.

Lord Lieutenant of Ayrshire

Lord-Lieutenant of AyrshireAyrshireLord Lieutenant of Ayrshire and Wigtownshire
After his term in New Zealand, Fergusson became chairman of the West Indies Closer Union Commission and was Lord Lieutenant of Ayrshire from 1937 until his death on 20 February 1951.

General (United Kingdom)

GeneralGen.full general
General Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet, (17 January 1865 – 20 February 1951) was a British Army officer and the third Governor-General of New Zealand.

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
General Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet, (17 January 1865 – 20 February 1951) was a British Army officer and the third Governor-General of New Zealand.

Governor-General of New Zealand

Governor-GeneralGovernorGovernor of New Zealand
General Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet, (17 January 1865 – 20 February 1951) was a British Army officer and the third Governor-General of New Zealand.

Eton College

EtonEtonianEton School
He was educated at Eton College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, before joining the Grenadier Guards in 1883.

Grenadier Guards

1st Foot Guards1st Regiment of Foot GuardsGrenadier
He was educated at Eton College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, before joining the Grenadier Guards in 1883.

Sudan

SudaneseRepublic of SudanRepublic of the Sudan
He served in Sudan from 1896 to 1898, becoming Commanding Officer of the 15th Sudanese Regiment in 1899 and Commander of the Omdurman District in 1900.

Commanding officer

Commanding GeneralCOmilitary commander
He served in Sudan from 1896 to 1898, becoming Commanding Officer of the 15th Sudanese Regiment in 1899 and Commander of the Omdurman District in 1900.

Omdurman

JarafaOmdurman, SudanKarari
He served in Sudan from 1896 to 1898, becoming Commanding Officer of the 15th Sudanese Regiment in 1899 and Commander of the Omdurman District in 1900.

Egyptian Army

ArmyEgyptianEgypt
He was made Adjutant General of the Egyptian Army 1901 and Commanding Officer of 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards in 1904 before becoming a Brigadier-General on the staff of the Irish Command in 1907.

Commander-in-Chief, Ireland

Commander-in-ChiefCommander-in-Chief of IrelandIrish Command
He was made Adjutant General of the Egyptian Army 1901 and Commanding Officer of 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards in 1904 before becoming a Brigadier-General on the staff of the Irish Command in 1907.

General officer commanding

GOCGeneral Officer Commanding-in-ChiefGOC-in-C
He was appointed Inspector of Infantry in 1909 and General Officer Commanding 5th Division in Ireland in 1913 – in this capacity he played a key role during the Curragh incident, ensuring his officers obeyed orders.