Sir John Wentworth, 1st Baronet

John WentworthSir John WentworthJohn Wentworth (governor)Governor John WentworthGovernor WentworthWentworthJohn
Sir John Wentworth, 1st Baronet (9 August 1737 – 8 April 1820) was the British colonial governor of New Hampshire at the time of the American Revolution.wikipedia
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Wolfeboro, New Hampshire

WolfeboroWolfeboro, NHSouth Wolfeboro, New Hampshire
Wentworth sat on a committee of partners that oversaw the settlement of the community, which the investors named Wolfeboro.
Colonial Governor John Wentworth, his nephew, established an estate on the site, known as Kingswood.

Strafford County, New Hampshire

Strafford CountyStraffordStrafford Counties
Wentworth was responsible for naming them, choosing names of current British leaders (including Rockingham), but also named Strafford County after one of his distant relatives, Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford.
It was named after William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford in the mistaken belief that he was the ancestor of governor John Wentworth – although they were distantly related, William had no descendants.

Province of New Hampshire

New HampshireProvince of New-HampshireColony of New Hampshire
His ancestry went back to some of the earliest settlers of the Province of New Hampshire, and he was grandson of John Wentworth, who served as the province's lieutenant governor in the 1720s, a nephew to Governor Benning Wentworth, and a descendant of "Elder" William Wentworth.
After Governor John Wentworth fled New Hampshire in August 1775, the inhabitants adopted a constitution in early 1776.

William Wentworth (elder)

William Wentworth
His ancestry went back to some of the earliest settlers of the Province of New Hampshire, and he was grandson of John Wentworth, who served as the province's lieutenant governor in the 1720s, a nephew to Governor Benning Wentworth, and a descendant of "Elder" William Wentworth.
New Hampshire governors Benning Wentworth and Sir John Wentworth are also descendants, as were Judge John Wentworth and his son John Wentworth Jr., a New Hampshire representative to the Continental Congress.

John Wentworth (lieutenant governor, born 1671)

John WentworthJohn Wentworth (Lieutenant-Governor)John Wentworth (elder)
His ancestry went back to some of the earliest settlers of the Province of New Hampshire, and he was grandson of John Wentworth, who served as the province's lieutenant governor in the 1720s, a nephew to Governor Benning Wentworth, and a descendant of "Elder" William Wentworth.
Mark's son in his turn would also become the last royal governor, John Wentworth.

Portrait of Mrs. Theodore Atkinson Jr.

Frances Wentworth
Frances Wentworth had been unhappy since her arrival in Nova Scotia.
When she was a young teenager, she had fallen in love with her first cousin, John Wentworth.

Benning Wentworth

Governor Benning WentworthGovernor WentworthW--ntw--th
His ancestry went back to some of the earliest settlers of the Province of New Hampshire, and he was grandson of John Wentworth, who served as the province's lieutenant governor in the 1720s, a nephew to Governor Benning Wentworth, and a descendant of "Elder" William Wentworth.
His nephew John Wentworth succeeded him as governor.

Royal Nova Scotia Regiment

Despite difficulties, the Royal Nova Scotia Regiment was brought up to a useful strength within a year and served until disbanded with the coming of peace in 1802.
The unit was commanded by Colonel John Wentworth, the lieutenant-governor of the colony, throughout its existence.

Government House (Nova Scotia)

Government HouseGovernment House of Nova Scotia
Government House, as it became known, eventually went three times over its initial budget, and the Wentworths did not finally move in until 1805, when the interior was still not finished.
Construction of Government House was ordered in 1800 by then governor Sir John Wentworth to replace the existing Government House that stood on the present location of Province House, with the cornerstone of the former being laid on 1 September of that year.

Francestown, New Hampshire

FrancestownFrancestown AcademyFrancestown Township
Her name is preserved in the towns of Francestown, Deering and Wentworth.
Incorporated in 1772, Francestown takes its name from Frances Deering Wentworth, the wife of colonial governor John Wentworth.

Deering, New Hampshire

Deering
Her name is preserved in the towns of Francestown, Deering and Wentworth.
First settled about 1765, the town was incorporated on January 17, 1774 by John Wentworth, governor of the province of New Hampshire.

Sable Island

Sable Island, Nova ScotiaIsle of SableIsle of Sables
Wentworth also improved and expanded roads, increased support to Nova Scotia's poverty stricken Mi'kmaq people and set up the first rescue station on Sable Island.
A series of life-saving stations were established on Sable Island by the governor of Nova Scotia, John Wentworth, in 1801.

Charles Mary Wentworth (1798 ship)

Charles Mary Wentworth
Simeon Perkins of Liverpool outfitted a privateer ship named after Wentworth's son, the Charles Mary Wentworth, which netted 19,000 pounds sterling on her second cruise.
The ship was named after Charles Mary Wentworth, the son of then governor of Nova Scotia, Sir John Wentworth.

Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn

Duke of KentPrince EdwardPrince Edward, Duke of Kent
In May, 1794, another royal prince arrived at Halifax, the fourth son of the King, Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, along with his mistress, Julie, Madame de Saint-Laurent.
Lieutenant Governor Sir John Wentworth and Lady Francis Wentworth provided their country residence for the use of Prince Edward and Julie St. Laurent.

List of New Hampshire historical markers (51–75)

New Hampshire Historical Marker No. 57New Hampshire Historical Marker No. 53New Hampshire Historical Marker No. 55
"This marker stands on the northwesterly part of a 4,000-acre tract which comprised the elegant country estate of John Wentworth, last royal governor of New Hampshire (1767–1775). The manor house, erected in 1769 on the northeast shore of this Lake, was the earliest summer home in the Lakes Region. It was destroyed by fire in 1820."

Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsTories
He organized a small force of trusted men to act as guards of his person and property, and during early 1775 pressure on the province's Loyalists was prompting some of them to flee to the safety of the British Army presence in Boston.

List of colonial governors of New Hampshire

Governor of the Province of New HampshireGovernorscolonial governor
In 1775, with the advent of the American Revolutionary War, the province's last royal governor, John Wentworth, fled the colony.

Prince's Lodge, Nova Scotia

Princes LodgePrince's LodgePrince's Lodge (Music Room)
The two couples formed a lasting friendship, which led to Wentworth offering the Prince the use of his small estate outside of town, which is today known as Princes Lodge.
The Prince was often entertained by Sir John Wentworth, the Lieutenant-Governor of the colony, at his rural estate, the "Friar's Cell", as Wentworth called it, is an allusion to Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

William Cottnam Tonge

William Cottnam
Wentworth initially enjoyed good relations with the legislature but in later years fell into an escalating confrontation with the informal leader of the country party, William Cottnam Tonge.
Although he was able to secure some military contracts, his attempts to improve his finances through patronage were blocked by the lieutenant governor John Wentworth.

List of New Hampshire historical markers (176–200)

New Hampshire Historical Marker No. 186New Hampshire Historical Marker No. 192Alderbrook, New Hampshire
"In 1771, Timothy Nash of Lancaster and Benjamin Sawyer of Conway made a bargain with Governor John Wentworth to bring a horse through Crawford Notch in order to prove the route's commercial value. The pair succeeded by dragging and lowering the animal down rock faces. Sawyer's Rock is said to be the last obstacle they encountered before reaching the Bartlett intervales. Nash and Sawyer were rewarded with a 2,184 acre parcel at the northern end of the Notch. Sawyer's Rock symbolizes the determination and foresight that helped open and develop trade and travel into the White Mountains Region."

List of lieutenant governors of Nova Scotia

Governor of Nova ScotiaLieutenant Governor of Nova ScotiaLieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia

List of New Hampshire historical markers (101–125)

New Hampshire Historical Marker No. 114New Hampshire Historical Marker No. 102New Hampshire Historical Marker No. 115
"Governor John Wentworth and the King's Council voted in the spring of 1771 that a highway be made from the Governor's estate at Wolfeborough to Dartmouth College. Joseph Senter, David Copp and Samuel Shepard surveyed the 67-mile road which followed this route to Plymouth. Thence it passed through Groton, around Lary's and Goose Ponds, over Moose Mountain to Hanover. Wentworth rode over it to Dartmouth's first commencement, August 28, 1771."

George Prévost

George PrevostSir George PrevostSir George Prévost
With the war with France renewed in 1803 and conflict with the United States intensifying, London abruptly replaced Wentworth in 1808 with a military governor, General George Prevost.
The amendment of the law is considered to be a good achievement by Prévost, because his predecessor as lieutenant governor, John Wentworth, had been responsible for relations between the executive and legislative bodies of Nova Scotia weakening.

Wentworth, Nova Scotia

Wentworth
John's name is preserved in the community of Wentworth and the surrounding area.
It is named after Sir John Wentworth, a former lieutenant-governor of the province.

Wentworth baronets

baronetcyWentworth of GosfieldJohn Wentworth
Wentworth was knighted and awarded a baronetcy in 1795, and granted a coat of arms by the College of Arms, London, England, 16 May 1795.
The Wentworth Baronetcy, of Parlut in the County of Lincoln, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 16 May 1795 for John Wentworth.