Skolts

Skolt SamiSkoltSkolt SámiSkolt Saamilocal Sami populationlocal Skolt Sami populationSkolt communitySkolt samis
The Skolt Sámi or Skolts are a Sami ethnic group.wikipedia
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Sevettijärvi

They currently live in and around the villages of Sevettijärvi, Keväjärvi, Nellim in the municipality of Inari, at several places in the Murmansk Oblast and in the village of Neiden in the municipality of Sør-Varanger.
Sevettijärvi and its surrounding areas are one of the main areas where the Skolts live.

Sør-Varanger

Sør-Varanger Municipality2015 rock art find at Tømmerneset, Finnmark, NorwayRock art at an eponymous place in another county
They currently live in and around the villages of Sevettijärvi, Keväjärvi, Nellim in the municipality of Inari, at several places in the Murmansk Oblast and in the village of Neiden in the municipality of Sør-Varanger.
The original inhabitants of the area are the Skolt Sami.

Sámi people

SamiSami peopleSámi
The Skolt Sámi or Skolts are a Sami ethnic group. They belong to the eastern group of Sámi on account of their language and traditions, and are traditionally Orthodox rather than Lutheran Christians like most Sami and Finns.

Neiden, Norway

NeidenNäätämöNeidenfjord
They currently live in and around the villages of Sevettijärvi, Keväjärvi, Nellim in the municipality of Inari, at several places in the Murmansk Oblast and in the village of Neiden in the municipality of Sør-Varanger.
Neiden became the main settlement of the westernmost Njauddâm sijdd (, i.e. the fundamental unit of the old Sami society, indicating both the area and the family group(s) exploiting it) of the Skolts and has remained relatively unchanged, leaving numerous traces of earlier use of the area intact.

Nellim

They currently live in and around the villages of Sevettijärvi, Keväjärvi, Nellim in the municipality of Inari, at several places in the Murmansk Oblast and in the village of Neiden in the municipality of Sør-Varanger.
Nellim (Nellim or Nellimö; ; ) is a village on the shore of Lake Inari in Inari, Finland that has three distinctly different cultures: Finns, the Inari Sámi and the Skolt Sámi.

Skolt Sami language

Skolt SamiSkolt SámiSkolt
They belong to the eastern group of Sámi on account of their language and traditions, and are traditionally Orthodox rather than Lutheran Christians like most Sami and Finns.
Skolt Sami (sääʹmǩiõll, "the Sámi language", or nuõrttsääʹmǩiõll, "the Eastern Sámi language", if a distinction needs to be made between it and the other Sami languages) is a Uralic, Sami language that is spoken by the Skolts, with approximately 300 speakers in Finland, mainly in Sevettijärvi and approximately 20–30 speakers of the Njuõʹttjäuʹrr (Notozero) dialect in an area surrounding Lake Lovozero in Russia.

Finnish Orthodox Church

OrthodoxOrthodox Church of FinlandFinland
They belong to the eastern group of Sámi on account of their language and traditions, and are traditionally Orthodox rather than Lutheran Christians like most Sami and Finns.
Traditionally, the Skolts, now a small minority of only 400 speakers, have been the earliest Orthodox Christians in the Finnish Lapland.

Pechengsky District

PetsamoPechengaPechengsky
As a result of the Treaty of Tartu (1920), the Skolt homeland was split in two: the western part, Petsamo, became part of Finland and the eastern part became part of the Soviet Union.
Inspired by the model of the Solovetsky Monastery, Tryphon wished to convert the local Skolt Sami population to Christianity and to demonstrate how faith could flourish in the most inhospitable lands.

Tryphon of Pechenga

St. TryphonTrifon
Saint Tryphon of Pechenga converted the Skolts to Christianity in the 16th century and even today, the majority of Skolts are members of the Eastern Orthodox Church.
* Skolts

Keväjärvi

They currently live in and around the villages of Sevettijärvi, Keväjärvi, Nellim in the municipality of Inari, at several places in the Murmansk Oblast and in the village of Neiden in the municipality of Sør-Varanger.

Inari, Finland

InariInari municipalityAanaar
They currently live in and around the villages of Sevettijärvi, Keväjärvi, Nellim in the municipality of Inari, at several places in the Murmansk Oblast and in the village of Neiden in the municipality of Sør-Varanger.

Murmansk Oblast

MurmanskMurmansk regionLapland
They currently live in and around the villages of Sevettijärvi, Keväjärvi, Nellim in the municipality of Inari, at several places in the Murmansk Oblast and in the village of Neiden in the municipality of Sør-Varanger.

Indigenous peoples

indigenousindigenous peopleaboriginal
The Skolts are considered to be the indigenous people of the borderland area between present-day Finland, Russia and Norway, i.e. on the Kola Peninsula and the adjacent Fenno-Scandinavian mainland.

Finland

FinnishFINRepublic of Finland
The Skolts are considered to be the indigenous people of the borderland area between present-day Finland, Russia and Norway, i.e. on the Kola Peninsula and the adjacent Fenno-Scandinavian mainland.

Russia

Russian FederationRUSRussian
The Skolts are considered to be the indigenous people of the borderland area between present-day Finland, Russia and Norway, i.e. on the Kola Peninsula and the adjacent Fenno-Scandinavian mainland.

Norway

NorwegianKingdom of NorwayNOR
The Skolts are considered to be the indigenous people of the borderland area between present-day Finland, Russia and Norway, i.e. on the Kola Peninsula and the adjacent Fenno-Scandinavian mainland.

Kola Peninsula

Kola InletKolaKolskaya Guba
The Skolts are considered to be the indigenous people of the borderland area between present-day Finland, Russia and Norway, i.e. on the Kola Peninsula and the adjacent Fenno-Scandinavian mainland.

Fennoscandia

Fenno-ScandinaviaFennoscandian PeninsulaFennoscandian Craton
The Skolts are considered to be the indigenous people of the borderland area between present-day Finland, Russia and Norway, i.e. on the Kola Peninsula and the adjacent Fenno-Scandinavian mainland.

Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland

Evangelical LutheranLutheranChurch of Finland
They belong to the eastern group of Sámi on account of their language and traditions, and are traditionally Orthodox rather than Lutheran Christians like most Sami and Finns.

Treaty of Tartu (Russian–Finnish)

Treaty of TartuTartu Peace Treaty1920 Treaty of Tartu
As a result of the Treaty of Tartu (1920), the Skolt homeland was split in two: the western part, Petsamo, became part of Finland and the eastern part became part of the Soviet Union.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
As a result of the Treaty of Tartu (1920), the Skolt homeland was split in two: the western part, Petsamo, became part of Finland and the eastern part became part of the Soviet Union.

Winter War

Soviet-Finnish WarSoviet invasion of FinlandRusso-Finnish War
After the Winter War (1939), Finland lost its portion of the Rybachiy Peninsula to the Soviet Union and after the Continuation War (1941–1944), it lost Petsamo, too.

Rybachy Peninsula

RybachyKalastajasaarentoRybachiy Peninsula
After the Winter War (1939), Finland lost its portion of the Rybachiy Peninsula to the Soviet Union and after the Continuation War (1941–1944), it lost Petsamo, too.

Continuation War

ContinuationwarWorld War II
After the Winter War (1939), Finland lost its portion of the Rybachiy Peninsula to the Soviet Union and after the Continuation War (1941–1944), it lost Petsamo, too.