Slalom skiing

slalomSLparallel slalomslalom skierslalomsAlpine Skialpine slalomdownhill racinginline Alpine slalomMen's Slalom
Slalom is an alpine skiing and alpine snowboarding discipline, involving skiing between poles or gates.wikipedia
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Giant slalom

GSparallel giant slalomgiant slalom skiing
These are spaced more closely than those in giant slalom, super giant slalom and downhill, necessitating quicker and shorter turns.
It involves skiing between sets of poles (gates) spaced at a greater distance from each other than in slalom but less than in Super-G.

Downhill (ski competition)

downhillDHdownhill skiing
These are spaced more closely than those in giant slalom, super giant slalom and downhill, necessitating quicker and shorter turns.
Whereas the other alpine skiing events (slalom, giant slalom, super giant slalom, and combined) emphasize turning and technique, downhill emphasizes "the six components of technique, courage, speed, risk, physical condition and judgement", according to the FIS "International Ski Competition Rules (ICR)".

Super-G

Super GSGsuper giant slalom
These are spaced more closely than those in giant slalom, super giant slalom and downhill, necessitating quicker and shorter turns.
Along with the faster downhill, it is regarded as a "speed" event, in contrast to the technical events giant slalom and slalom.

FIS Alpine World Ski Championships

World ChampionshipsWorld Championshipworld champion
Internationally, the sport is contested at the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships, and at the Olympic Winter Games.
The combined event was dropped after 1948 with the addition of the giant slalom in 1950, but returned in 1954 as a "paper" race which used the results of the three events: downhill, giant slalom, and slalom.

FIS Alpine Ski World Cup

World CupAlpine skiing World CupAlpine Ski World Cup
World Cup skiers commonly skied on slalom skis at a length of 203 - 207 cm in the 1980s and 1990s but by the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, the majority of competitors were using skis measuring 160 cm or less.
Competitors attempt to achieve the best time in four disciplines: slalom, giant slalom, super G, and downhill.

Arnold Lunn

Sir Arnold LunnArnoldArnold Henry Moore Lunn
The rules for the modern slalom were developed by Arnold Lunn in 1922 for the British National Ski Championships, and adopted for alpine skiing at the 1936 Winter Olympics.
Introduced to skiing by his father, he invented the slalom skiing race in 1922.

Patrick Russel

He specialized in the technical disclipines (giant slalom and slalom) and won three discipline championships in the World Cup: slalom in 1969 and 1970 and giant slalom in 1971.

Bode Miller

Bode Miller Alpine SkiingBode Miller Alpine Racing
American Bode Miller hastened the shift to the shorter, more radical sidecut skis when he achieved unexpected success after becoming the first Junior Olympic athlete to adopt the equipment in giant slalom and super-G in 1996.
He made history early in the season by winning at least one race in each of the four standard World Cup disciplines: slalom, giant slalom, super-G and downhill.

Alpine skiing

alpine skieralpine ski raceralpine
Slalom is an alpine skiing and alpine snowboarding discipline, involving skiing between poles or gates.
Norwegian legend Sondre Norheim first began the trend of skis with curved sides, bindings with stiff heel bands made of willow, and the slalom turn style.

Gustav Thöni

Gustavo ThoeniGustav ThoniGustav Thoeni
Thöni was the dominant skier in the technical events (slalom and giant slalom) in the early 1970s.

Ingemar Stenmark

He is regarded as one of the most prominent Swedish athletes ever, and as the greatest slalom and giant slalom specialist of all time.

Christian Neureuther

Born and raised in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bavaria, Neureuther specialized in the slalom and won six World Cup races and attained 20 podiums.

Sondre Norheim

Sondre Nordheim
Sondre Norheim and other skiers from Telemark practiced uvyrdslåm or "disrespectful/reckless downhill" where they raced downhill in difficult and untested terrain (i.e., off piste).
His reputation grew, and eventually made Norwegian words like ski and slalåm (slalom) known worldwide.

Jean-Noël Augert

Jean-Noel Augert
Nicknamed "Rosko", he was, however, a specialist of the slalom discipline, in which he won three World Cups in 1969, 1971 and 1972, and in which he won a Gold medal at the 1970 World Championships in Val Gardena.

International Ski Federation

International Ski Federation (FIS)FISFederation Internationale de Ski
Out of concern for the safety of athletes, the FIS began to set minimum ski lengths for international slalom competition.

Bojan Križaj

Bojan Krizaj
In the season 1976/77 he received the first World Cup point, qualified among the 15 best slalom runners and later during that season in Madonna di Campiglio he hit his first top 3 podium.

Roland Thöni

Rolando Thoeni
His World Cup debut was on February 7, 1971 was a top ten finish; he took seventh place in the slalom at Mürren, Switzerland.

Mathias Zdarsky

Mathias Zdarsky's development of the Lilienfeld binding helped change hill races into a specialty of the Alps region.
However the event attained little attention beyond ski enthusiasts, so in 1922 the Englishman Arnold Lunn invented the shorter, but more difficult slalom race, which had greater appeal.

Marc Girardelli

In 1981, he started to make significant progress with his first podium (top-three finish) in Wengen, Switzerland, and from that moment was in contention for slalom and giant slalom podiums on a regular basis.

Alpine skiing at the 2002 Winter Olympics

2002Alpine skiing2002 Winter Olympics
World Cup skiers commonly skied on slalom skis at a length of 203 - 207 cm in the 1980s and 1990s but by the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, the majority of competitors were using skis measuring 160 cm or less.
The downhill, super-G, and combined events were held at Snowbasin, the giant slaloms at Park City, and the slaloms at adjacent Deer Valley.

Alpine skiing at the 1936 Winter Olympics

Alpine skiing19361936 Winter Olympics
The rules for the modern slalom were developed by Arnold Lunn in 1922 for the British National Ski Championships, and adopted for alpine skiing at the 1936 Winter Olympics.
The two-run slalom races were run on the weekend at Gudiberg with the women's event on Saturday and the men's on Sunday.

Winter Olympic Games

Winter OlympicsOlympicsOlympic
Internationally, the sport is contested at the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships, and at the Olympic Winter Games.

Phil Mahre

Phil
He won his first World Cup race the next season, a giant slalom at Val d'Isère in December 1976, and followed it up with a slalom win in March at Sun Valley, defeating the man who became his primary rival, the legendary Swede Ingemar Stenmark, with twin brother Steve taking third.