Slapstick

slapstick comedyslapstick humorslap-stick slapstickcomedycomic pugnacityhumorphysical and situational comedy styleslapstick comediesslapstick comedy film
Slapstick is a style of humor involving exaggerated physical activity which exceeds the boundaries of normal physical comedy.wikipedia
997 Related Articles

Physical comedy

pratfallsphysicalpratfall
Slapstick is a style of humor involving exaggerated physical activity which exceeds the boundaries of normal physical comedy.
It can include slapstick, clowning, mime, physical stunts, or making funny faces.

Humour

humorhumorousComedy
Slapstick is a style of humor involving exaggerated physical activity which exceeds the boundaries of normal physical comedy.
For example, young children may favour slapstick such as Punch and Judy puppet shows or the Tom and Jerry cartoons, whose physical nature makes it accessible to them.

The Comedy of Errors

comedy of errorsA Comedy of ErrorsAngelo
Shakespeare incorporated many chase scenes and beatings into his comedies, such as in his play The Comedy of Errors.
It is his shortest and one of his most farcical comedies, with a major part of the humour coming from slapstick and mistaken identity, in addition to puns and word play.

Comedy

comediccomediescomic
Slapstick comedy's history is measured in centuries.
Karno was a pioneer of slapstick, and in his biography, Laurel stated, "Fred Karno didn't teach Charlie [Chaplin] and me all we know about comedy. He just taught us most of it".

Mack Sennett

Bathing BeautiesSennettSennett Bathing Beauties
Building on its later popularity in the 19th and early 20th-century ethnic routines of the American vaudeville house, the style was explored extensively during the "golden era" of black and white, silent movies directed by figures Mack Sennett and Hal Roach and featuring such notables as Charlie Chaplin, Mabel Normand, Laurel and Hardy, the Marx Brothers, the Keystone Cops, The Three Stooges, and Chespirito.
It was the first fully enclosed film stage, and Sennett became famous as the originator of slapstick routines such as pie-throwing and car-chases, as seen in the Keystone Cops films.

Fred Karno

KarnoFred Karno's Army
The influential English music hall comedian and theatre impresario Fred Karno developed a form of sketch comedy without dialogue in the 1890s, and Chaplin and Laurel were among the young comedians who worked for him as part of "Fred Karno's Army".
As a comedian of slapstick he is credited with popularizing the custard-pie-in-the-face gag.

Stan Laurel

LaurelStanArthur Stanley Jefferson
British comedians who honed their skills at pantomime and music hall sketches include Charlie Chaplin, Stan Laurel, George Formby and Dan Leno.
Karno was a pioneer of slapstick, and in his biography Laurel stated, "Fred Karno didn't teach Charlie [Chaplin] and me all we know about comedy. He just taught us most of it".

Laurel and Hardy

Laurel & HardyStan Laurel and Oliver Hardycomedy duo
Building on its later popularity in the 19th and early 20th-century ethnic routines of the American vaudeville house, the style was explored extensively during the "golden era" of black and white, silent movies directed by figures Mack Sennett and Hal Roach and featuring such notables as Charlie Chaplin, Mabel Normand, Laurel and Hardy, the Marx Brothers, the Keystone Cops, The Three Stooges, and Chespirito.
They became well known during the late 1920s to the mid-1940s for their slapstick comedy, with Laurel playing the clumsy and childlike friend of the pompous bully Hardy.

The Three Stooges

Three StoogesHis StoogesStooge
Building on its later popularity in the 19th and early 20th-century ethnic routines of the American vaudeville house, the style was explored extensively during the "golden era" of black and white, silent movies directed by figures Mack Sennett and Hal Roach and featuring such notables as Charlie Chaplin, Mabel Normand, Laurel and Hardy, the Marx Brothers, the Keystone Cops, The Three Stooges, and Chespirito.
Their hallmark was physical farce and slapstick.

Pantomime

pantomimespantopantomimist
In early 19th century England, pantomime acquired its present form which includes slapstick comedy, while comedy routines also featured heavily in British music hall theatre which became popular in the 1850s.
It was the most exciting part of the "panto", because it was fast-paced and included spectacular scenic magic as well as slapstick comedy, dancing and acrobatics.

Commedia dell'arte

commedia dell’artecommediacommedia del arte
The term arises from a device developed during the broad, physical comedy style known as Commedia dell'arte in 16th Century Italy.
Characters were identified by costumes, masks, and props, such as a type of baton known as a slapstick.

Punch and Judy

PunchMr. PunchMister Punch
The physical slap stick remains a key component of the plot in the traditional and popular Punch and Judy puppet show.
A ghost might then appear and give Mr. Punch a fright before it too is chased off with a slapstick.

Charles Prince (actor)

Charles Prince
Silent slapstick comedy was also popular in early French films and included films by Max Linder, Charles Prince, and Sarah Duhamel.
Charles Prince Seigneur (27 April 1872 – 18 July 1933) was a French-born film actor and comedian, best known for his screen persona "Rigadin" in numerous short slapstick comedies.

Max Linder

Silent slapstick comedy was also popular in early French films and included films by Max Linder, Charles Prince, and Sarah Duhamel.
Also during this period, Linder applied for work at Pathé Frères in Vincennes at the suggestion of film director Louis Gasnier and began appearing in small bit parts, mostly in slapstick comedies.

Charlie Chaplin

ChaplinCharles ChaplinChaplinesque
British comedians who honed their skills at pantomime and music hall sketches include Charlie Chaplin, Stan Laurel, George Formby and Dan Leno.
While Chaplin's comedic style is broadly defined as slapstick, it is considered restrained and intelligent, with the film historian Philip Kemp describing his work as a mix of "deft, balletic physical comedy and thoughtful, situation-based gags".

Buster Keaton

KeatonBuster Keaton ProductionsKeaton (Buster)
Slapstick continues to maintain a presence in modern comedy that draws upon its lineage, running in film from Buster Keaton and Louis de Funès to Jerry Lewis and Mel Brooks to the television series Jackass and comedy movies by the Farrelly Brothers, and in live performance from Weber and Fields to Jackie Gleason to Rowan Atkinson.
Comedy director Leo McCarey, recalling the freewheeling days of making slapstick comedies, said, "All of us tried to steal each other's gagmen. But we had no luck with Keaton, because he thought up his best gags himself and we couldn't steal him!" The more adventurous ideas called for dangerous stunts, performed by Keaton at great physical risk.

Tom and Jerry

Tom & JerryTom and Jerry and the Wizard of Ozcartoon cat and mouse
Slapstick also became a common element in animated features starting in the 1930; examples include Disney's Goofy shorts, Walter Lantz's Woody Woodpecker, MGM's Tom and Jerry, the unrelated Tom and Jerry cartoons of Van Beuren Studios, Warner Bros. Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies, MGM's Barney Bear, and Tex Avery's Screwy Squirrel.
The Filmation Tom and Jerry cartoons were noticeably different from Hanna-Barbera's efforts, as they returned Tom and Jerry to the original chase formula, with a somewhat more "slapstick" humor format.

The Benny Hill Show

Benny HillBenny Hill ShowHill's Angel
In England, slapstick was a main element of the Monty Python comedy troupe and in television series such as Fawlty Towers and The Benny Hill Show.
The show consisted mainly of sketches that were full of slapstick, mime, parody and double entendre.

List of slapstick comedy topics

List of slapstick comedy topics
This is a list of slapstick comedy topics. Slapstick is a type of broad physical comedy involving exaggerated, boisterous actions (e.g. a pie in the face), farce, violence and activities which may exceed the boundaries of common sense.

Marx Brothers

The Marx BrothersMarx BrosMarx Brother
Building on its later popularity in the 19th and early 20th-century ethnic routines of the American vaudeville house, the style was explored extensively during the "golden era" of black and white, silent movies directed by figures Mack Sennett and Hal Roach and featuring such notables as Charlie Chaplin, Mabel Normand, Laurel and Hardy, the Marx Brothers, the Keystone Cops, The Three Stooges, and Chespirito.

Farrelly brothers

Peter and Bobby FarrellyConundrum EntertainmentThe Farrelly Brothers
Slapstick continues to maintain a presence in modern comedy that draws upon its lineage, running in film from Buster Keaton and Louis de Funès to Jerry Lewis and Mel Brooks to the television series Jackass and comedy movies by the Farrelly Brothers, and in live performance from Weber and Fields to Jackie Gleason to Rowan Atkinson.
Their films make frequent use of slapstick and toilet humor, and are often populated with blunt, profane working-class characters in small roles.

Barney Bear

Barney
Slapstick also became a common element in animated features starting in the 1930; examples include Disney's Goofy shorts, Walter Lantz's Woody Woodpecker, MGM's Tom and Jerry, the unrelated Tom and Jerry cartoons of Van Beuren Studios, Warner Bros. Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies, MGM's Barney Bear, and Tex Avery's Screwy Squirrel.

Jackass (franchise)

JackassJackass TV seriesJackass'' film series
Slapstick continues to maintain a presence in modern comedy that draws upon its lineage, running in film from Buster Keaton and Louis de Funès to Jerry Lewis and Mel Brooks to the television series Jackass and comedy movies by the Farrelly Brothers, and in live performance from Weber and Fields to Jackie Gleason to Rowan Atkinson.

Harisen

Paper fan
Harisen, a paper fan used by the Japanese for a similar purpose.
* Slapstick, a wooden device traditionally used in the West for a similar purpose.

Exaggeration

exaggeratedexaggerateexaggerates
Slapstick is a style of humor involving exaggerated physical activity which exceeds the boundaries of normal physical comedy.