Slice of life

slice-of-lifeslice of life storyeveryday lifedaily livesevents of everyday lifemundane encountersordinary people doing everyday thingsrealistic setting of a normal family in a normal town, with normal livesslice of life stories
Slice of life describes the depiction of mundane experiences in art and entertainment.wikipedia
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Paddy Chayefsky

Paddy ChayevskyChayefskyThe Passion of Josef D.
During the 1950s, the phrase was commonly used in critical reviews of live television dramas, notably teleplays by JP Miller, Paddy Chayefsky, and Reginald Rose.
Martin Gottfried wrote in All His Jazz that Chayefsky "was a successful writer, the most successful graduate of television's slice of life school of naturalism."

Reginald Rose

During the 1950s, the phrase was commonly used in critical reviews of live television dramas, notably teleplays by JP Miller, Paddy Chayefsky, and Reginald Rose.
His realistic approach helped create the slice of life school of television drama, which was particularly influential in the anthology programs of the 1950s.

JP Miller

J.P. Miller
During the 1950s, the phrase was commonly used in critical reviews of live television dramas, notably teleplays by JP Miller, Paddy Chayefsky, and Reginald Rose.
Presented live with tape inserts on CBS, the television production, starring Cliff Robertson, Piper Laurie, Charles Bickford and Malcolm Atterbury, was a powerful slice of life probe into the nature of alcoholism.

Teleplay

scripttelevision writerteleplays
During the 1950s, the phrase was commonly used in critical reviews of live television dramas, notably teleplays by JP Miller, Paddy Chayefsky, and Reginald Rose.
However, television dramatists, such as Paddy Chayefsky, JP Miller and Tad Mosel, turned such limitations to their advantage by writing television plays with intimate situations and family conflicts characterized by naturalistic, slice of life dialogue.

Naturalism (theatre)

naturalismnaturalisticnaturalist
In theater it refers to naturalism, while in literary parlance it is a narrative technique in which a seemingly arbitrary sequence of events in a character's life is presented, often lacking plot development, conflict and exposition, and often having an open ending. In theatrical parlance, the term slice of life refers to a naturalistic representation of real life, sometimes used as an adjective, as in "a play with 'slice of life' dialogue".

Real life

real-lifemeatspacereal world
In theatrical parlance, the term slice of life refers to a naturalistic representation of real life, sometimes used as an adjective, as in "a play with 'slice of life' dialogue".

Play (theatre)

playplaysstage play
In theatrical parlance, the term slice of life refers to a naturalistic representation of real life, sometimes used as an adjective, as in "a play with 'slice of life' dialogue".

Calque

loan translationcalquescalquing
The term originated between 1890 and 1895 as a calque from the French phrase tranche de vie, credited to the French playwright Jean Jullien (1854–1919).

Glossary of French expressions in English

fait accomplien massechanteuse
The term originated between 1890 and 1895 as a calque from the French phrase tranche de vie, credited to the French playwright Jean Jullien (1854–1919).

List of French playwrights

FrenchFrench playwrights
The term originated between 1890 and 1895 as a calque from the French phrase tranche de vie, credited to the French playwright Jean Jullien (1854–1919).

Playwright

dramatistplaywrightsplaywriting
The term originated between 1890 and 1895 as a calque from the French phrase tranche de vie, credited to the French playwright Jean Jullien (1854–1919).

Essay

essaysessayistarticles
Turney in his essay "Notes on Naturalism in the Theatre":

Théâtre Libre

Théâtre-Libre
The Serenade was introduced by the Théâtre Libre in 1887.

Immorality

immoralmorally bankruptmoral bankruptcy
It is a prime example of rosserie, that is, plays dealing with corrupt, morally bankrupt characters who seem to be respectable, "smiling, smiling, damned villains..."

Synonym

syn.synonymssynonymous
At that time, it was sometimes used synonymously with the pejorative term kitchen sink realism adopted from British films and theatre.

Kitchen sink realism

kitchen sink dramakitchen sinkkitchen sink dramas
At that time, it was sometimes used synonymously with the pejorative term kitchen sink realism adopted from British films and theatre.

Narrative

storystoriesnarratives
In literary parlance, the term "slice of life" refers to a storytelling technique that presents a seemingly arbitrary sample of a character's life, which often lacks a coherent plot, conflict, or ending.

Character (arts)

fictional charactercharacterfictional
In literary parlance, the term "slice of life" refers to a storytelling technique that presents a seemingly arbitrary sample of a character's life, which often lacks a coherent plot, conflict, or ending.

Plot (narrative)

plotsplotstoryline
In literary parlance, the term "slice of life" refers to a storytelling technique that presents a seemingly arbitrary sample of a character's life, which often lacks a coherent plot, conflict, or ending. The story may have little plot progress and often has no exposition, conflict, or dénouement, but rather has an open ending.

Conflict (narrative)

conflictconflictsman vs. nature
In literary parlance, the term "slice of life" refers to a storytelling technique that presents a seemingly arbitrary sample of a character's life, which often lacks a coherent plot, conflict, or ending.

Exposition (narrative)

expositionexpositorynarrative exposition
The story may have little plot progress and often has no exposition, conflict, or dénouement, but rather has an open ending.

Dramatic structure

dénouementdenouementplotline
The story may have little plot progress and often has no exposition, conflict, or dénouement, but rather has an open ending.

Guy de Maupassant

MaupassantDe MaupassantHenri René Albert Guy de Maupassant
This is demonstrated in the case of Guy de Maupassant's novel A Woman's Life, which told the story of a woman who transferred an unreturned love for her husband into a pathological affection for her son.

Pathology

pathologistpathologicalpathologies
This is demonstrated in the case of Guy de Maupassant's novel A Woman's Life, which told the story of a woman who transferred an unreturned love for her husband into a pathological affection for her son.

Social issue

social issuessocial problemssocial
Some authors, particularly playwrights, used it by focusing on the "underbelly of life" to expose social ills and repressive social codes with the aim of shocking the audience so that they call for social reform.