Slovaks

SlovakSlovakianSlovakiansSlovak nationSlovak descentcultureCzech/Slovak/Hungarianethnic Slovakethnic Slovak majorityethnic-Slovak
The Slovaks or Slovak people (Slováci, singular Slovák, feminine Slovenka, plural Slovenky) are a nation and West Slavic ethnic group native to Slovakia who share a common ancestry, culture, history and speak the Slovak language.wikipedia
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Slovakia

🇸🇰SlovakSVK
The Slovaks or Slovak people (Slováci, singular Slovák, feminine Slovenka, plural Slovenky) are a nation and West Slavic ethnic group native to Slovakia who share a common ancestry, culture, history and speak the Slovak language.
The population is over 5.4 million and consists mostly of Slovaks.

West Slavs

West SlavicWestern SlavicSlavic
The Slovaks or Slovak people (Slováci, singular Slovák, feminine Slovenka, plural Slovenky) are a nation and West Slavic ethnic group native to Slovakia who share a common ancestry, culture, history and speak the Slovak language.
West Slavic speaking nations today include the Czechs, Poles, Slovaks, Sorbs and ethnic groups Kashubians, Moravians and Silesians.

History of Slovakia

Slovak national movementSlovakiahistory
The Slovaks or Slovak people (Slováci, singular Slovák, feminine Slovenka, plural Slovenky) are a nation and West Slavic ethnic group native to Slovakia who share a common ancestry, culture, history and speak the Slovak language.
According to archaeologist P. M. Barford, these features suggest that the Carpathian Mountains and the Sudetes separated the ancestors of the Slovaks and the Czechs from the Slavs living to the north of those mountains.

Slovak diaspora

Significant populationsSlovak
There are Slovak minorities in Czech Republic, Croatia, Poland, Hungary, Serbia and sizeable populations of immigrants and their descendants in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, collectively referred to as the Slovak diaspora.
The country with the largest number of Slovaks living abroad is the United States.

Tóth

Tót
In Hungarian "Slovak" is Tót (pl: tótok), an exonym.
Tóth (sometimes Toth) is a very common surname in Hungary, meaning "Slav" and later "Slovak" in old Hungarian (now spelt tót).

Great Moravia

MoraviaMoraviansGreat Moravian Empire
The Principality of Nitra become a part of Great Moravia, a common state of (later) Moravians and Slovaks (Czech ancestors were joined only for a few years). The opposite theory, supporting the supposed former common past of the Czech and Slovak nations, thus also legitimizing the creation of the united Czechoslovak nation, gained political support in the inter-war Czechoslovakia.
The only formation preceding it in these territories was Samo's Empire known from between 631 and 658 AD. Great Moravia was thus the first joint state of the Slavonic tribes that became later known as Czechs and Slovaks and that later formed Czechoslovakia.

Czechoslovakism

Czechoslovak unionismCzechoslovakCzechoslovak nation
The opposite theory, supporting the supposed former common past of the Czech and Slovak nations, thus also legitimizing the creation of the united Czechoslovak nation, gained political support in the inter-war Czechoslovakia.
Czechoslovakism (Čechoslovakismus, Čechoslovakizmus) is a concept which underlines reciprocity of the Czechs and the Slovaks.

Slavs

SlavicSlavSlavonic
The name Slovak is derived from *Slověninъ, plural *Slověně, the old name of the Slavs (Proglas, around 863).
Present-day Slavic people are classified into East Slavs (chiefly Belarusians, Russians, Rusyns, and Ukrainians), West Slavs (chiefly Czechs, Kashubs, Moravians, Poles, Silesians, Slovaks and Sorbs), and South Slavs (chiefly Bosniaks, Bulgarians, Croats, Macedonians, Gorani, Pomaks, Montenegrins, Serbs and Slovenes).

Czech Republic

🇨🇿CzechCZE
There are Slovak minorities in Czech Republic, Croatia, Poland, Hungary, Serbia and sizeable populations of immigrants and their descendants in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, collectively referred to as the Slovak diaspora.
According to preliminary results of the 2011 census, the majority of the inhabitants of the Czech Republic are Czechs (63.7%), followed by Moravians (4.9%), Slovaks (1.4%), Poles (0.4%), Germans (0.2%) and Silesians (0.1%).

Upper Hungary

FelvidékSouthern Slovakiadifferent region
The territory of present-day Slovakia was split in two parts between the Kingdom of Hungary (under Hungarian rule gradually from 907 to the early 14th century) to Upper Hungary and Royal Hungary (under the Habsburgs from 1527 – 1848 (see also Hungarian Revolution of 1848)) until the formation of Czechoslovakia in 1918.
The population of Upper Hungary was mixed and mainly consisted of Slovaks, Hungarians, Germans and Ruthenians.

Svatopluk I of Moravia

SvatoplukSvatopluk ISvätopluk
In 1722, Michal Bencsik, professor of law at the University of Trnava, published theory that nobility and burghers of Trenčín should not have same privileges as Hungarians, because they are descendants of Svatopluk's people (inferior to Magyars).
Svatopluk, whose empire encompassed parts of the territory of modern Czech Republic (Moravia and Bohemia), Slovakia, Poland and Hungary, has occasionally been inaccurately presented as a "Slovak King" in Slovak literary works since the 18th century, the period of the Slovak national awakening.

Tótkomlós

Komlós
Many place names in Hungary such as Tótszentgyörgy, Tótszentmárton, and Tótkomlós still bear the name.
It was rebuilt after 1715 with Slovak settlers.

Hungary

🇭🇺HungarianHUN
There are Slovak minorities in Czech Republic, Croatia, Poland, Hungary, Serbia and sizeable populations of immigrants and their descendants in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, collectively referred to as the Slovak diaspora.
According to the 2011 census, there were 8,314,029 (83.7%) ethnic Hungarians, 308,957 (3.1%) Romani, 131,951 (1.3%) Germans, 29,647 (0.3%) Slovaks, 26,345 (0.3%) Romanians, and 23,561 (0.2%) Croats in Hungary; 1,455,883 people (14.7% of the total population) did not declare their ethnicity.

Bratislava

PressburgPozsonyPreßburg
Some Croats settled around and in present-day Bratislava for similar reasons.
The city's history has been strongly influenced by people of different nations and religions, namely (in alphabetical order) Austrians, Bulgarians, Croats, Czechs, Germans, Hungarians, Jews, Serbs and Slovaks.

Poland

🇵🇱PolishPOL
There are Slovak minorities in Czech Republic, Croatia, Poland, Hungary, Serbia and sizeable populations of immigrants and their descendants in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, collectively referred to as the Slovak diaspora.
Other minority national and ethnic groups in Poland include the Romani, Polish Jews, Lemkos, Lithuanians, Armenians, Vietnamese, Slovaks, Czechs, Russians, Greeks and Lipka Tatars.

Bardejov

BártfaBardejov Town Conservation ReserveBardejov, Šariš Region
The first written mention of new form in the territory of present-day Slovakia is from Bardejov (1444, "Nicoulaus Cossibor hauptman, Nicolaus Czech et Slowak, stipendiarii supremi"). The mentions in Czech sources are older (1375 and 1385).
According to the 2001 census, 91.3% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 2.6% Romani, 2.5% Rusyns, and 1.4% Ukrainians.

Daniel Rapant

His theory about the lack of population in the greater part of Slovakia covered by forests had already been scientifically refuted by Daniel Rapant (e.g. in his work O starý Liptov, 1934), and was proven wrong by numerous archaeological finds and rejected by Czechoslovak histography.
Daniel Rapant (17 April 1897 Holíč, Austria-Hungary – 17 April 1988 Bratislava, Czechoslovakia) was a Slovak historian, archivist and university teacher.

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
The territory of present-day Slovakia was split in two parts between the Kingdom of Hungary (under Hungarian rule gradually from 907 to the early 14th century) to Upper Hungary and Royal Hungary (under the Habsburgs from 1527 – 1848 (see also Hungarian Revolution of 1848)) until the formation of Czechoslovakia in 1918.
The population consisted of Czechs (51%), Slovaks (16%), Germans (22%), Hungarians (5%) and Rusyns (4%).

Trenčín

TrencsénLaugaricioTrenčín, Czechoslovakia
In 1722, Michal Bencsik, professor of law at the University of Trnava, published theory that nobility and burghers of Trenčín should not have same privileges as Hungarians, because they are descendants of Svatopluk's people (inferior to Magyars).
95.3% inhabitants were Slovaks and 2.4% Czechs.

Ján Cikker

Jan CikkerJán '''Cikker
The most important Slovak composers have been Eugen Suchoň, Ján Cikker, and Alexander Moyzes, in the 21st century Vladimir Godar and Peter Machajdík.
Ján Cikker (29 July 1911 – 21 December 1989) was a Slovak composer, a leading exponent of modern Slovak classical music.

Slovaks in Hungary

SlovaksSlovakSlovak minority in Hungary
After the Ottoman Empire were forced to retreat from present-day Hungary around 1700, thousands of Slovaks were gradually settled in depopulated parts of the restored Kingdom of Hungary (present-day Hungary, Romania, Serbia, and Croatia) under Maria Theresia, and that is how present-day Slovak enclaves (like Slovaks in Vojvodina, Slovaks in Hungary) in these countries arose.
According to the Census in 2001, a total number of 17,692 people claimed themselves to be Slovaks in Hungary.

Jozef Murgaš

Reverend
Such people include Jozef Murgaš, the inventor of wireless telegraphy; Ján Bahýľ, Štefan Banič, inventor of the modern parachute; Aurel Stodola, inventor of the bionic arm and pioneer in thermodynamics; and, more recently, John Dopyera, father of modern acoustic string instruments.
Jozef Murgaš (English Joseph Murgas) (17 February 1864 – 11 May 1929) was a Slovak inventor, architect, botanist, painter and Roman Catholic priest.

Martin Benka

More contemporary art can be seen in the shadows of Koloman Sokol, Albín Brunovský, Martin Benka, Mikuláš Galanda, Ľudovít Fulla.
Martin Benka (21 September 1888, Kostolište – 28 June 1971, Malacky) was a Slovak painter and illustrator.

Slovak language

SlovakSlovakianSlovak-language
The Slovaks or Slovak people (Slováci, singular Slovák, feminine Slovenka, plural Slovenky) are a nation and West Slavic ethnic group native to Slovakia who share a common ancestry, culture, history and speak the Slovak language.

Aurel Stodola

StodolaAurel Boleslav Stodola
Such people include Jozef Murgaš, the inventor of wireless telegraphy; Ján Bahýľ, Štefan Banič, inventor of the modern parachute; Aurel Stodola, inventor of the bionic arm and pioneer in thermodynamics; and, more recently, John Dopyera, father of modern acoustic string instruments.
Aurel Boleslav Stodola (10 May 1859 – 25 December 1942) was a Slovak engineer, physicist, and inventor.