Small Solar System body

small Solar System bodiessmall bodiesmacroscopic systemminor bodiesother planetary objectsplanetoidsSmall bodysmall natural objects in orbit around the Sunsmall objects in the Solar SystemSSSB
A small Solar System body (SSSB) is an object in the Solar System that is neither a planet, a dwarf planet, nor a natural satellite.wikipedia
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Solar System

outer Solar Systeminner Solar Systemouter planets
A small Solar System body (SSSB) is an object in the Solar System that is neither a planet, a dwarf planet, nor a natural satellite.
Of the objects that orbit the Sun directly, the largest are the eight planets, with the remainder being smaller objects, the dwarf planets and small Solar System bodies.

Natural satellite

moonmoonssatellite
A small Solar System body (SSSB) is an object in the Solar System that is neither a planet, a dwarf planet, nor a natural satellite. Except for the largest, which are in hydrostatic equilibrium, natural satellites (moons) differ from small Solar System bodies not in size, but in their orbits.
A natural satellite, or moon, is, in the most common usage, an astronomical body that orbits a planet or minor planet (or sometimes another small Solar System body).

Comet

cometslong-period cometJupiter-family comet
This encompasses all comets and all minor planets other than those that are dwarf planets. These include the near-Earth asteroids, centaurs, comets, and scattered disc objects.
A comet is an icy, small Solar System body that, when passing close to the Sun, warms and begins to release gases, a process called outgassing.

IAU definition of planet

2006 definition of planetdefinition of a planetdefinition of planet
The term was first defined in 2006 by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) as follows: "All other objects, except satellites, orbiting the Sun shall be referred to collectively as 'Small Solar System Bodies' ".
A non-satellite body fulfilling only the first criterion is termed a "small Solar System body" (SSSB).

Minor planet

planetoidminor planetsplanetoids
This encompasses all comets and all minor planets other than those that are dwarf planets.
Before 2006 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) officially used the term minor planet, but during that year's meeting it reclassified minor planets and comets into dwarf planets and small Solar System bodies (SSSBs).

Centaur (small Solar System body)

centaurcentaursCentaur (minor planet)
Thus SSSBs are: the comets; the classical asteroids, with the exception of the dwarf planet Ceres; the trojans; and the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, with the exception of the dwarf planets Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris and others that may turn out to be dwarf planets. These include the near-Earth asteroids, centaurs, comets, and scattered disc objects.
Centaurs are small Solar System bodies with either a perihelion or a semi-major axis between those of the outer planets.

Asteroid

asteroidsminor bodyMinor Planet
Thus SSSBs are: the comets; the classical asteroids, with the exception of the dwarf planet Ceres; the trojans; and the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, with the exception of the dwarf planets Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris and others that may turn out to be dwarf planets.
In 2006, the term "small Solar System body" was also introduced to cover both most minor planets and comets.

Ceres (dwarf planet)

Ceres1 CeresAtmosphere of Ceres
Thus SSSBs are: the comets; the classical asteroids, with the exception of the dwarf planet Ceres; the trojans; and the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, with the exception of the dwarf planets Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris and others that may turn out to be dwarf planets.
Indeed, the IAU has never defined the word 'asteroid' at all, having preferred the term 'minor planet' until 2006, and preferring the terms 'small Solar System body' and 'dwarf planet' after 2006.

Planet

planetsFormer classification of planetsplanemo
A small Solar System body (SSSB) is an object in the Solar System that is neither a planet, a dwarf planet, nor a natural satellite.
Protoplanets that have avoided collisions may become natural satellites of planets through a process of gravitational capture, or remain in belts of other objects to become either dwarf planets or small bodies.

Haumea

136108 HaumeaHaumea (dwarf planet)0.7
Thus SSSBs are: the comets; the classical asteroids, with the exception of the dwarf planet Ceres; the trojans; and the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, with the exception of the dwarf planets Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris and others that may turn out to be dwarf planets.
However, because the planets and most small Solar System bodies share a common orbital alignment from their formation in the primordial disk of the Solar System, most early surveys for distant objects focused on the projection on the sky of this common plane, called the ecliptic.

Hydrostatic equilibrium

hydrostatic balanceequilibriumhydrostatic
Some of the larger small Solar System bodies may be reclassified in future as dwarf planets, pending further examination to determine whether or not they are in hydrostatic equilibrium.
Hydrostatic equilibrium is the current distinguishing criterion between dwarf planets and small Solar System bodies, and has other roles in astrophysics and planetary geology.

Kuiper belt

Kuiper belt objectKuiper belt objectsKuiper cliff
The orbits of the vast majority of small Solar System bodies are located in two distinct areas, namely the asteroid belt and the Kuiper belt.
Like the asteroid belt, it consists mainly of small bodies or remnants from when the Solar System formed.

Near-Earth object

near-Earth asteroidNEOnear-Earth
These include the near-Earth asteroids, centaurs, comets, and scattered disc objects.
A near-Earth object (NEO) is any small Solar System body whose orbit brings it to proximity with Earth.

Asteroid belt

main-beltMain beltmain-belt asteroid
The orbits of the vast majority of small Solar System bodies are located in two distinct areas, namely the asteroid belt and the Kuiper belt.
Classes of small Solar System bodies in other regions are the near-Earth objects, the centaurs, the Kuiper belt objects, the scattered disc objects, the sednoids, and the Oort cloud objects.

Scattered disc

SDOscattered diskscattered disc object
These include the near-Earth asteroids, centaurs, comets, and scattered disc objects.
The scattered disc (or scattered disk) is a distant circumstellar disc in the Solar System that is sparsely populated by icy small solar system bodies, which are a subset of the broader family of trans-Neptunian objects.

List of Solar System objects by size

largest25th-largest bodyequatorial radius
This list contains the Sun, the planets, dwarf planets, many of the larger small Solar System bodies (which includes the asteroids), all named natural satellites, and a number of smaller objects of historical or scientific interest, such as comets and near-Earth objects.

List of gravitationally rounded objects of the Solar System

Gravitationally rounded objectaverage distance19 moons
Except for the largest, which are in hydrostatic equilibrium, natural satellites (moons) differ from small Solar System bodies not in size, but in their orbits.
This list does not include most small Solar System bodies, but it does include a sample of possible planetary-mass objects whose shape has yet to be accurately determined.

Trans-Neptunian object

TNOtrans-Neptunian objectscolor indices
Thus SSSBs are: the comets; the classical asteroids, with the exception of the dwarf planet Ceres; the trojans; and the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, with the exception of the dwarf planets Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris and others that may turn out to be dwarf planets.

Dwarf planet

dwarf planetsList of dwarf planetsplanet
A small Solar System body (SSSB) is an object in the Solar System that is neither a planet, a dwarf planet, nor a natural satellite. This encompasses all comets and all minor planets other than those that are dwarf planets.

International Astronomical Union

IAUWorking Group for Planetary System NomenclatureInternational Astronomical Union (IAU)
The term was first defined in 2006 by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) as follows: "All other objects, except satellites, orbiting the Sun shall be referred to collectively as 'Small Solar System Bodies' ".

Trojan (celestial body)

Trojans in astronomyTrojan asteroidtrojan
Thus SSSBs are: the comets; the classical asteroids, with the exception of the dwarf planet Ceres; the trojans; and the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, with the exception of the dwarf planets Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris and others that may turn out to be dwarf planets.

Pluto

134340 Pluto(134340) Plutoescaped moon of Neptune
Thus SSSBs are: the comets; the classical asteroids, with the exception of the dwarf planet Ceres; the trojans; and the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, with the exception of the dwarf planets Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris and others that may turn out to be dwarf planets.

Makemake

136472 Makemake2005 FY 9 Make- make
Thus SSSBs are: the comets; the classical asteroids, with the exception of the dwarf planet Ceres; the trojans; and the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, with the exception of the dwarf planets Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris and others that may turn out to be dwarf planets.

Eris (dwarf planet)

Eris136199 Eris2003 UB313
Thus SSSBs are: the comets; the classical asteroids, with the exception of the dwarf planet Ceres; the trojans; and the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, with the exception of the dwarf planets Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris and others that may turn out to be dwarf planets.