Smart Personal Objects Technology

SPOT
The Smart Personal Objects Technology (SPOT) is a discontinued initiative by Microsoft to create intelligent and personal home appliances, consumer electronics, and other objects through new hardware capabilities and software features.wikipedia
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Smartwatch

smart watchsmartwatcheswatch phone
SPOT was first announced by Bill Gates at the COMDEX computer exposition event in 2002, and additional details were revealed by Microsoft at the 2003 Consumer Electronics Show where Gates demonstrated a set of prototype smart watches—the first type of device that would support the technology.
SPOT stands for Smart Personal Objects Technology, an initiative by Microsoft to personalize household electronics and other everyday gadgets.

DirectBand

Microsoft Research and SCA Data Systems would ultimately develop the DirectBand subcarrier technology for SPOT.
DirectBand is a product of the Smart Personal Objects Technology (SPOT) team at Microsoft.

Home appliance

home appliancesappliancesappliance
The Smart Personal Objects Technology (SPOT) is a discontinued initiative by Microsoft to create intelligent and personal home appliances, consumer electronics, and other objects through new hardware capabilities and software features.
Smart Personal Objects Technology

MSN Direct

In June 2003, Microsoft unveiled its MSN Direct wireless service developed specifically for SPOT, which would be made available across North America.
MSN Direct was an FM radio-based digital service which allowed 'SPOT' portable devices to receive information from MSN services.

.NET Micro Framework

SPOT relied on the .NET Micro Framework for the creation and management of embedded device firmware.
The Micro Framework has its roots in Microsoft's Smart Personal Objects Technology (SPOT) initiative and was used in MSN Direct products such as smart watches before being made available to third-party developers early in 2007.

Microsoft Band

Band
Microsoft Band
Smart Personal Objects Technology

Windows SideShow

SideShow gadgets
This technology would later be used for the Windows SideShow feature introduced in Windows Vista, which shares design similarities with SPOT.
* Smart Personal Objects Technology

Smart Display

Smart Displays
Smart Display
* Smart Personal Objects Technology

Microsoft

Microsoft CorporationMSMicrosoft Corp.
The Smart Personal Objects Technology (SPOT) is a discontinued initiative by Microsoft to create intelligent and personal home appliances, consumer electronics, and other objects through new hardware capabilities and software features.

Consumer electronics

consumer electronicelectronic deviceselectronics
The Smart Personal Objects Technology (SPOT) is a discontinued initiative by Microsoft to create intelligent and personal home appliances, consumer electronics, and other objects through new hardware capabilities and software features.

Microsoft Research

MicrosoftMicrosoft Research CambridgeMicrosoft Research Labs
Development of SPOT began as an incubation project initiated by the Microsoft Research division.

Bill Gates

BillGatesBill and Melinda Gates
SPOT was first announced by Bill Gates at the COMDEX computer exposition event in 2002, and additional details were revealed by Microsoft at the 2003 Consumer Electronics Show where Gates demonstrated a set of prototype smart watches—the first type of device that would support the technology.

COMDEX

SPOT was first announced by Bill Gates at the COMDEX computer exposition event in 2002, and additional details were revealed by Microsoft at the 2003 Consumer Electronics Show where Gates demonstrated a set of prototype smart watches—the first type of device that would support the technology.

Consumer Electronics Show

CESSCES '94Winter Consumer Electronics Show
SPOT was first announced by Bill Gates at the COMDEX computer exposition event in 2002, and additional details were revealed by Microsoft at the 2003 Consumer Electronics Show where Gates demonstrated a set of prototype smart watches—the first type of device that would support the technology.

3G

3G networkIMTthird generation
Unlike more recent technologies, SPOT did not use more traditional forms of connectivity, such as 3G or Wi-Fi, but relied on FM broadcasting subcarrier transmission as a method of data distribution.

Wi-Fi

WiFiwireless internetwireless
Unlike more recent technologies, SPOT did not use more traditional forms of connectivity, such as 3G or Wi-Fi, but relied on FM broadcasting subcarrier transmission as a method of data distribution.

FM broadcasting

FMFM radioFM band
Unlike more recent technologies, SPOT did not use more traditional forms of connectivity, such as 3G or Wi-Fi, but relied on FM broadcasting subcarrier transmission as a method of data distribution.

Subcarrier

sub-carriersubcarriersFM stereo subcarrier
Unlike more recent technologies, SPOT did not use more traditional forms of connectivity, such as 3G or Wi-Fi, but relied on FM broadcasting subcarrier transmission as a method of data distribution.

Transmission (telecommunications)

transmissiontransmittransmissions
Unlike more recent technologies, SPOT did not use more traditional forms of connectivity, such as 3G or Wi-Fi, but relied on FM broadcasting subcarrier transmission as a method of data distribution.

Failure

failcommercial failureepic fail
While several types of electronics would eventually support the technology throughout its lifecycle, SPOT was considered a commercial failure.

Subscription business model

subscriptionsubscribersubscriptions
Reasons that have been cited for its failure include its subscription-based business model, support limited to North America, the emergence of more efficient and popular forms of data distribution, and mobile feature availability that surpasses the features that SPOT offered.

North America

NorthNAAmerica
Reasons that have been cited for its failure include its subscription-based business model, support limited to North America, the emergence of more efficient and popular forms of data distribution, and mobile feature availability that surpasses the features that SPOT offered.

Atari

Atari Inc.Atari EuropeAtari Corp.
Karr had previously worked in the 1980s to develop technology for Atari that would distribute games in a manner distinct from the company's competitors; Karr proposed FM broadcasting subcarrier transmission as a method of distribution, technology which would also be used by Microsoft's SPOT.

National Semiconductor

NationalNational Semiconductor Corp.NSC
National Semiconductor would aid in the development of device chipsets, which would feature a ARM7 CPU and ROM, SRAM, and a 100 MHz RF receiver chip.

Chipset

chipsetschip setchip
National Semiconductor would aid in the development of device chipsets, which would feature a ARM7 CPU and ROM, SRAM, and a 100 MHz RF receiver chip.