Smokey Bear

Smokey the BearThe Smokey Bear ShowBallad of Smokey the BearSmokeySmoky the BearThe Smokey the Bear Show
Smokey Bear is an American campaign and advertising icon created by the U.S.wikipedia
197 Related Articles

Ad Council

Advertising CouncilWar Advertising CouncilThe Ad Council
Smokey Bear is an American campaign and advertising icon created by the U.S. Forest Service with artist Albert Staehle, In the Wildfire Prevention Campaign, which is the longest-running public service announcement campaign in United States history, the Ad Council, the United States Forest Service (USFS), and the National Association of State Foresters (NASF), in partnership with creative agency FCB, employ Smokey Bear to educate the public about the dangers of unplanned human-caused wildfires.
Examples include a partnership with Warner Bros. featuring characters from Where the Wild Things Are in PSAs to counteract childhood obesity, PSAs for child passenger safety featuring clips from Warner Bros. The Wizard of Oz, a partnership with Sony Pictures Entertainment's The Smurfs 2 to encourage children to explore nature, and Disney characters such as Baby Einstein for the LATCH System for the U.S. Department of Transportation, Pinocchio and The Jungle Book for MyPyramid, Bambi, Sleeping Beauty, and Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears for Smokey Bear, Cinderella for child booster seats by the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Little Einsteins for art instruction.

National Association of State Foresters

State Forester
Smokey Bear is an American campaign and advertising icon created by the U.S. Forest Service with artist Albert Staehle, In the Wildfire Prevention Campaign, which is the longest-running public service announcement campaign in United States history, the Ad Council, the United States Forest Service (USFS), and the National Association of State Foresters (NASF), in partnership with creative agency FCB, employ Smokey Bear to educate the public about the dangers of unplanned human-caused wildfires.
The Cooperative Forest Fire Prevention (CFFP) Program, commonly known as the Smokey Bear program, was created to maintain public awareness of the need to prevent human caused wildfires.

United States Forest Service

U.S. Forest ServiceForest ServiceUSDA Forest Service
Smokey Bear is an American campaign and advertising icon created by the U.S. Forest Service with artist Albert Staehle, In the Wildfire Prevention Campaign, which is the longest-running public service announcement campaign in United States history, the Ad Council, the United States Forest Service (USFS), and the National Association of State Foresters (NASF), in partnership with creative agency FCB, employ Smokey Bear to educate the public about the dangers of unplanned human-caused wildfires.
The poster campaign was a success; the black bear would later be named Smokey Bear, and would, for decades, be the "spokesbear" for the Forest Service.

Rudy Wendelin

Rudolph Wendelin
In 1949, Forest Service worker Rudy Wendelin became the campaign's full-time artist and was considered Smokey Bear's "manager" until Wendelin retired in 1973.
Rudolph Andreas Michael Wendelin (1910–2000) was a United States Forest Service employee and the best-known artist behind Smokey Bear.

Junior Forest Rangers

A Smokey Bear doll was produced by Ideal Toys beginning in 1952; the doll included a mail-in card for children to become Junior Forest Rangers.
The Junior Forest Rangers program began in 1953, when a Smokey Bear plush toy produced by Ideal Toys and sold by Macy's department store came with a card that allowed children to contact Smokey and become a Junior Forest Ranger.

Capitan Mountains

CapitanCapitan Gap
The living symbol of Smokey Bear was a five-pound, three month old American black bear cub who was found in the spring of 1950 after the Capitan Gap fire, a wildfire that burned in the Capitan Mountains of New Mexico.
The small town of Capitan is on the southwestern side of the mountain and is the location of Smokey Bear Historical Park.

Bambi

FlowerBambi on iceBambi's father
The same year, on August 13, Disney's full-length animated motion picture Bambi premiered in New York City. According to Richard Earle, author of The Art of Cause Marketing, the Smokey Bear campaign is among the most powerful and enduring of all public service advertising: "Smokey is simple, strong, straightforward. He's a denizen of those woods you're visiting, and he cares about preserving them. Anyone who grew up watching Bambi realizes how terrifying a forest fire can be. But Smokey wouldn't run away. Smokey's strong. He'll stay and fight the fire if necessary, but he'd rather have you douse it and cover it up so he doesn't have to."
However, Bambi was only loaned to the government for a year, so a new symbol was needed, leading to the creation of Smokey Bear.

Campaign hat

campaign coverLemon Squeezerlemon squeezer" hat
In the first poster, overseen by the Cooperative Forest Fire Prevention Campaign (CFFP), Smokey was depicted wearing jeans and a campaign hat, pouring a bucket of water on a campfire.
So common is use of the campaign hat among state highway police that they are sometimes referred to as "smokey bears" or "smokeys," after Smokey Bear, the US Forest Service mascot.

Wildfire

forest fireforest fireswildfires
Smokey Bear is an American campaign and advertising icon created by the U.S. Forest Service with artist Albert Staehle, In the Wildfire Prevention Campaign, which is the longest-running public service announcement campaign in United States history, the Ad Council, the United States Forest Service (USFS), and the National Association of State Foresters (NASF), in partnership with creative agency FCB, employ Smokey Bear to educate the public about the dangers of unplanned human-caused wildfires. The living symbol of Smokey Bear was a five-pound, three month old American black bear cub who was found in the spring of 1950 after the Capitan Gap fire, a wildfire that burned in the Capitan Mountains of New Mexico.
Later posters of the program featured Uncle Sam, characters from the Disney movie Bambi, and the official mascot of the U.S. Forest Service, Smokey Bear.

Capitan, New Mexico

Capitan
Upon the death of the original bear on November 9, 1976, his remains were returned by the government to Capitan, New Mexico, and buried at Smokey Bear Historical Park, operated by the New Mexico State Forestry Division.
First called Hotfoot Teddy, he was later renamed Smokey and became the real-life version of the United States Forest Service mascot Smokey Bear.

Jackson Weaver

Washington, D.C., radio station WMAL personality Jackson Weaver served as the primary voice representing Smokey until Weaver's death in October 1992.
In addition to being the original voice for Smokey Bear, he was the co-host of WMAL's Washington, D.C. morning drive program for 32 years, along with his broadcast partner Frank Harden.

American black bear

black bearblack bearsUrsus americanus
The living symbol of Smokey Bear was a five-pound, three month old American black bear cub who was found in the spring of 1950 after the Capitan Gap fire, a wildfire that burned in the Capitan Mountains of New Mexico.
An American black bear cub, who in the spring of 1950 was caught in the Capitan Gap Fire, was made into the living representative of Smokey Bear, the mascot of the United States Forest Service.

Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Thanksgiving Day ParadeMacy’s Thanksgiving Day ParadeMacy's Thanksgiving Parade
The same day, a Smokey Bear balloon was featured in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, and it was advertised as "Thanksgiving is Smokey Bear Day on NBC TV".

Walter E. Rollins

Jack RollinsWalter "Jack" RollinsWalter E. "Jack" Rollins
Also in 1952, songwriters Steve Nelson and Jack Rollins had a successful song named "Smokey the Bear" which was performed by Eddy Arnold.
Jack Rollins also wrote "Smokey the Bear" for the public-service mascot Smokey Bear, and co-wrote many country songs for artists such as Gene Autry, Hank Snow, George Jones and Eddy Arnold.

Capitan Gap Fire

Capitan Gap forest fireforest fire
The living symbol of Smokey Bear was a five-pound, three month old American black bear cub who was found in the spring of 1950 after the Capitan Gap fire, a wildfire that burned in the Capitan Mountains of New Mexico.
He was rescued by the firefighters and named Hotfoot, before filling the role of Smokey Bear.

National Zoological Park (United States)

National ZooNational Zoological ParkNational Zoo in Washington, D.C.
According to the New York Times obituary for Homer C. Pickens, then assistant director of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, he kept the cub on his property for a while before flying with the bear to D.C. Soon after, Smokey was flown in a Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser airplane to the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. A special room was prepared for him at the St. Louis zoo for an overnight fuel stop during the trip, and when he arrived at the National Zoo, several hundred spectators, including members of the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, photographers, and media, were there to welcome him.
One of the most famous animals to have spent much of his life at the zoo was Smokey Bear, the "living symbol" of the cartoon icon created as part of a campaign to prevent forest fires.

Ideal Toy Company

IdealIdeal ToysIdeal Toy Corp.
A Smokey Bear doll was produced by Ideal Toys beginning in 1952; the doll included a mail-in card for children to become Junior Forest Rangers.

In the Bag

In 1956, he made a cameo appearance in the Walt Disney short film In the Bag with a voice provided by Jackson Weaver.
Humphrey then tries to burn the garbage with a match, but is stopped by Smokey the Bear, who reminds him that "only you can prevent forest fires."

Patrick Warburton

Patrick Warburton provided the voice of an anonymous park ranger.
Warburton is also the voice of Ranger, a forest ranger, in a series of radio spots for the national Smokey Bear campaign sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service and the Ad Council.

WSBN

WMALWMAL-AMWMAL AM
Washington, D.C., radio station WMAL personality Jackson Weaver served as the primary voice representing Smokey until Weaver's death in October 1992.
WMAL morning co-host Jackson Weaver died on October 20, 1992, with Harden and Weaver still at or near the top of the local ratings; Weaver also garnered fame nationally as the first voice of Smokey Bear.

Steve Nelson (songwriter)

Steve Nelson
Also in 1952, songwriters Steve Nelson and Jack Rollins had a successful song named "Smokey the Bear" which was performed by Eddy Arnold.
In 1952, Nelson co-wrote, again with Rollins, the song which was used for the safety campaign of Smokey Bear.

Public service announcement

PSApublic service announcementsPSAs
According to Richard Earle, author of The Art of Cause Marketing, the Smokey Bear campaign is among the most powerful and enduring of all public service advertising: "Smokey is simple, strong, straightforward. He's a denizen of those woods you're visiting, and he cares about preserving them. Anyone who grew up watching Bambi realizes how terrifying a forest fire can be. But Smokey wouldn't run away. Smokey's strong. He'll stay and fight the fire if necessary, but he'd rather have you douse it and cover it up so he doesn't have to." In June 2008, the Forest Service launched a new series of public service announcements voiced by actor Sam Elliott, simultaneously giving Smokey a new visual design intended to appeal to young adults.
One of the earliest television public service announcements came in the form of Smokey Bear.

Woodsy Owl

Woodsy the Owl
Harold Bell of Western Publishing (and the producer of the Smokey Bear public service announcements), along with Glen Kovar and Chuck Williams, originally created the mascot in 1970 as part of a United States Forest Service campaign to raise awareness of protecting the environment.

Sam Elliott

Elliott
In June 2008, the Forest Service launched a new series of public service announcements voiced by actor Sam Elliott, simultaneously giving Smokey a new visual design intended to appeal to young adults.
Starting in 2008, he has voiced Smokey Bear, and shares the mascot's birth date (August 9, 1944).

Johnny Horizon

Like the better known Smokey Bear and Woodsy Owl characters of the United States Forest Service, use of the Johnny Horizon mascot was protected under Federal law (18 U.S.C. 714) beginning in 1970 until his protection was repealed in 1982.