A report on Snap election

Election that is called earlier than the one that has been scheduled.

- Snap election

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Conservative Party (UK)

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One of two main political parties in the United Kingdom, alongside its primary rival since the 1930s, the Labour Party.

One of two main political parties in the United Kingdom, alongside its primary rival since the 1930s, the Labour Party.

Robert Peel, twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and founder of the Conservative Party
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, served as the first Conservative Secretary of State.
Winston Churchill, who was twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1929 Conservative poster attacking the Labour Party
Harold Macmillan is closely associated with the post-war settlement.
Edward Heath, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1970–1974)
Margaret Thatcher, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1979–1990)
John Major, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1990–1997)
Rail modal share (rail's share of total travel), 1952–2015
David Cameron, Prime Minister (2010–2016)
Theresa May, Prime Minister (2016-2019
Prime Minister Theresa May, right, with U.S. President Donald Trump, left, at a joint press conference in 2019
Boris Johnson, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (2019–present)
Conservative Party supporters at Pride London in 2010
Margaret Thatcher (second left), Ronald Reagan (far left) and their respective spouses in 1988. Thatcher and Reagan developed a close relationship against the Soviet Union.
The National Conservative Convention is held during the Conservative Party Conference.
Share of the vote received by Conservatives (blue), Whigs/Liberals/Liberal Democrats (orange), Labour (red) and others (grey) in general elections since 1832
The Conservatives' "oak tree" logo in Union Jack colours at the 2011 party conference.

A snap general election in 2017 resulted in the Conservatives losing their majority and governing through a confidence and supply arrangement with the Democratic Unionist Party.

2017 United Kingdom general election

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Held on Thursday 8 June 2017, two years after the previous general election in 2015; it was the first since 1992 to be held on a day that did not coincide with any local elections.

Held on Thursday 8 June 2017, two years after the previous general election in 2015; it was the first since 1992 to be held on a day that did not coincide with any local elections.

A polling station in north London
Campaigning on polling day, 8 June 2017
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn launching the party's general election campaign on 9 May 2017 in Manchester.
Great Britain opinion polling for the 2017 election; moving average is calculated from the last ten polls. Final point is actual result.
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The disproportionality of parliament in the 2017 election was 6.45 using the Gallagher Index.
Theresa May declares her intention to remain in office following the election result outside 10 Downing Street, 9 June 2017
Election results plotted on a map showing equal-size constituencies, showing winning party in each.
Election results showing the best-performing party in each constituency, other than Conservative or Labour.

Under the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 an election had not been due until May 2020, but Prime Minister Theresa May's call for a snap election was ratified by the necessary two-thirds vote in the House of Commons on 19 April 2017.

Official portrait, 2016

Theresa May

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British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Leader of the Conservative Party from 2016 to 2019.

British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Leader of the Conservative Party from 2016 to 2019.

Official portrait, 2016
Official portrait, 2016
The Church of St Mary the Virgin, Wheatley, where May's father was the vicar and where May married
May with her then-leader David Cameron, May 2010
Khat bundles
May, David Cameron and Najib Razak, 14 July 2011
Abu Qatada's deportation to Jordan in July 2013
May and Justine Greening speaking at Youth For Change, 19 July 2014
May and Vladimir Putin during the G20 summit in Hangzhou
May addressing the United Nations General Assembly in 2016
May and Donald Trump in Washington, D.C., January 2017
May at the G20 summit in Hamburg, 7–8 July 2017
May with Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) leader Arlene Foster
May with the President of Argentina, Mauricio Macri during the 2018 G20 Buenos Aires summit. May is the first British prime minister to visit Buenos Aires after the Falklands War.
Theresa May came under criticism for providing support to the Saudi Arabian-led intervention in Yemen.
May announces her resignation outside 10 Downing Street on 24 May 2019
May's first visit since becoming prime minister with First Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, at Bute House, Edinburgh
May meeting with State Counsellor of Myanmar and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi in September 2016
May with Queen Elizabeth II, US President Donald Trump and other world leaders to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day on 5 June 2019
Parade float created by Jacques Tilly at a 2019 protest against leaving the EU
2019 People's Vote March
On the backbench between Kenneth Clarke and Sir Alan Duncan during the Saturday sitting
May with her husband Philip in China, 2018
Theresa May meets with US Secretary of State John Kerry in July 2016 in London
May with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Osaka, 2019
May with Queen Elizabeth II and other world leaders to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day on 5 June 2019

The following month, she announced a snap general election, with the aims of strengthening her hand in Brexit negotiations and highlighting her "strong and stable" leadership.

Dissolution of parliament

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Mandatory simultaneous resignation of all of its members, in anticipation that a successive legislative assembly will reconvene later with possibly different members.

Mandatory simultaneous resignation of all of its members, in anticipation that a successive legislative assembly will reconvene later with possibly different members.

Early dissolutions may be possible in parliamentary and semi-presidential systems, to resolve conflicts between the executive and the legislature; either a snap election called by an executive seeking to increase its legislative support, or an election triggered by parliament withholding confidence and supply from the government.

Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011

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The Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (c.

The Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (c.

David Allen Green, a lawyer and journalist, and Andrew Blick, a legal academic, argued that the FTPA changed little in practice, since the Prime Minister could still, so long as at least a portion of the Opposition agrees, schedule an election at their pleasure.

Sigmar Gabriel (SPD), Angela Merkel (CDU) and Horst Seehofer (CSU) presenting the 2013 coalition agreement for Germany's third Merkel cabinet.

Coalition government

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Form of government in which political parties cooperate to form a government.

Form of government in which political parties cooperate to form a government.

Sigmar Gabriel (SPD), Angela Merkel (CDU) and Horst Seehofer (CSU) presenting the 2013 coalition agreement for Germany's third Merkel cabinet.

If a coalition collapses, the Prime Minister and cabinet may be ousted by a vote of no confidence, call snap elections, form a new majority coalition, or continue as a minority government.

The House of Representatives elected in 2010, with a 72-72 tie between the Labor Party and the Opposition Coalition.

Hung parliament

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Term used in legislatures under the Westminster system to describe a situation in which no single political party or pre-existing coalition has an absolute majority of legislators (commonly known as members or seats) in a parliament or other legislature.

Term used in legislatures under the Westminster system to describe a situation in which no single political party or pre-existing coalition has an absolute majority of legislators (commonly known as members or seats) in a parliament or other legislature.

The House of Representatives elected in 2010, with a 72-72 tie between the Labor Party and the Opposition Coalition.
15th Lok Sabha elected in 2009 Indian general election was India's last hung parliament.
The House of Commons following the 2017 general election. No party had a majority.
The 44th Canadian Parliament elected in the 2021 Canadian federal election was Canada's most recent hung parliament.

The third one resulted from the snap election held in June 2017 that had been called for by Theresa May in order to strengthen her majority heading into Brexit negotiations later in 2017.

Constituencies where the Unite to Remain pact was active. Coloured by which party stood a candidate.

2019 United Kingdom general election

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Held on Thursday, 12 December 2019.

Held on Thursday, 12 December 2019.

Constituencies where the Unite to Remain pact was active. Coloured by which party stood a candidate.
Map showing electoral pacts in Northern Ireland
A sticker in Bournemouth calling for tactical voting with an anti-Conservative billboard in the background
Great Britain opinion polling; moving average is calculated from the last 15 polls.
Equal-area projection of constituencies
Seats won in the election (outer ring) against number of votes (inner ring).
Results of the 2019 general election by party vote share
Constituencies gained in the 2019 general election ([[:File:UK General Election 2017-19 result changes.gif|animated version]])
Map detailing constituencies in which the Labour Party gained in vote percentage in the 2019 general election.
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National vote share as a percentage between 1997-2019
The disproportionality of parliament in the 2019 election was 11.84 using the Gallagher Index.

Johnson could not induce Parliament to approve a revised withdrawal agreement by the end of October, and chose to call for a snap election, which the House of Commons supported via the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019.

Diefenbaker in 1957

John Diefenbaker

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The 13th prime minister of Canada, serving from 1957 to 1963.

The 13th prime minister of Canada, serving from 1957 to 1963.

Diefenbaker in 1957
John Diefenbaker's birthplace
Diefenbaker as a law student, c. undefined 1919
Recreation of Diefenbaker's first office, Wakaw, Saskatchewan
Handout for the Diefenbaker campaign 1926
Diefenbaker as King's Counsel, 1929
Poster to advertise a speech by John Diefenbaker as Conservative candidate, 1939 (leading up to the 1940 federal election)
Diefenbaker makes his point in the House of Commons, 1948.
Three "Diefendollars", used to mock Diefenbaker during the 1962 campaign.
Diefenbaker stands to the right of Queen Elizabeth II at the 1960 Commonwealth Prime Minister's Conference.
Diefenbaker (seated left) and US President Dwight D. Eisenhower at the signing of the Columbia River Treaty, 1961.
Diefenbaker (front right) at the US Naval base in Argentia, Newfoundland during the 1962 campaign.
Button urging Diefenbaker's re-election
The Diefenbaker grave, close by the Diefenbaker Centre
Leo Mol's statue of John Diefenbaker on Parliament Hill, Ottawa

In 1957, he led the party to its first electoral victory in 27 years; a year later he called a snap election and spearheaded them to one of their greatest triumphs.

A polling station on election day

2021 Canadian federal election

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Held on September 20, 2021, to elect members of the House of Commons to the 44th Canadian Parliament.

Held on September 20, 2021, to elect members of the House of Commons to the 44th Canadian Parliament.

A polling station on election day
Election signs on the street in Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie
Evolution of voting intentions according to polls conducted during the campaign period of the 2021 Canadian federal election. Trendlines are 25-poll local regressions, with polls weighted by proximity in time and a logarithmic function of sample size. 95% confidence ribbons represent uncertainty about the trendlines, not the likelihood that actual election results would fall within the intervals.
Evolution of voting intentions according to polls conducted during the pre-campaign period of the 2021 Canadian federal election. Trendlines are 30-poll local regressions, with polls weighted by proximity in time and a logarithmic function of sample size. 95% confidence ribbons represent uncertainty about the trendlines, not the likelihood that actual election results would fall within the intervals.
Pie chart of popular vote and seat counts
Map showing results by riding
Cartogram of the 2021 Canadian federal election results using equal-area ridings

The writs of election were issued by Governor General Mary Simon on August 15, 2021, when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau requested the dissolution of parliament for a snap election.