Snuff (film)

SnuffSnuff'' (film)
Snuff is a 1976 American splatter film directed by Michael Findlay and Horacio Fredriksson.wikipedia
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Snuff film

snuffsnuff moviesnuff films
It is most notorious for being marketed as if it were an actual snuff film.
According to film critic Geoffrey O'Brien, "whether or not commercially distributed 'snuff' movies actually exist, the possibility of such movies is implicit in the stock B-movie motif of the mad artist killing his models, as in A Bucket of Blood (1959), Color Me Blood Red (1965), or Decoy for Terror (1967) also known as Playgirl Killer. The concept of "snuff films" being made for profit became more widely known with the commercial film Snuff (1976). This low-budget exploitation horror film, originally titled Slaughter, was directed by Michael and Roberta Findlay. In an interview decades later, Roberta Findlay said the film's distributor Allan Shackleton had read about snuff films being imported from South America and retitled Slaughter to Snuff, to exploit the idea; he also added a new ending that depicted an actress being murdered on a film set.

Roberta Findlay

Roberta
The film started out as a low-budget exploitation film titled Slaughter made by the husband-and-wife grindhouse filmmaking team of Michael and Roberta Findlay.

Michael Findlay

Michael and Roberta FindlayBlood SistersMichael
The film started out as a low-budget exploitation film titled Slaughter made by the husband-and-wife grindhouse filmmaking team of Michael and Roberta Findlay. Snuff is a 1976 American splatter film directed by Michael Findlay and Horacio Fredriksson.
It was then released under the name Snuff, with the tagline "The film that could only be made in South America... where Life is CHEAP".

Simon Nuchtern

Nuchtern
He added a new ending, directed in a vérité style by Simon Nuchtern, in which a woman is brutally murdered and dismembered by a film crew, supposedly the crew of Slaughter.
During the 1970s he was involved in the re-editing of several foreign-shot films prior to their distribution in the United States, notably the controversial Snuff (1976), which was marketed to exploit rumors of the existence of real-life snuff films.

Killing for Culture

Killing for Culture: An Illustrated History of Death Film from Mondo to Snuff (Creation Cinema #1)
It starts with a chapter on the infamous 1976 film Snuff.

Splatter film

torture pornsplattergore
Snuff is a 1976 American splatter film directed by Michael Findlay and Horacio Fredriksson.

Urban legend

urban mythurban legendsurban myths
This picture contributed to the urban legend of snuff films, although the concept did not originate with it.

Exploitation film

exploitationexploitation filmsexploitation cinema
The film started out as a low-budget exploitation film titled Slaughter made by the husband-and-wife grindhouse filmmaking team of Michael and Roberta Findlay.

Grindhouse

Grind Housegrind housesGrindhouse film
The film started out as a low-budget exploitation film titled Slaughter made by the husband-and-wife grindhouse filmmaking team of Michael and Roberta Findlay.

Argentina

ArgentineARGArgentinian
Filmed in Argentina in 1971 on a budget of $30,000, it depicted the actions of a Manson-esque murder cult, and was shot mainly without sound due to the actors understanding very little English.

Charles Manson

Manson FamilyMansonManson murders
Filmed in Argentina in 1971 on a budget of $30,000, it depicted the actions of a Manson-esque murder cult, and was shot mainly without sound due to the actors understanding very little English.

Cult

cultsreligious cultdestructive cult
Filmed in Argentina in 1971 on a budget of $30,000, it depicted the actions of a Manson-esque murder cult, and was shot mainly without sound due to the actors understanding very little English.

MOS (filmmaking)

MOSall dialogue and sound effects were added in post-productionmotor only sync
Filmed in Argentina in 1971 on a budget of $30,000, it depicted the actions of a Manson-esque murder cult, and was shot mainly without sound due to the actors understanding very little English.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Filmed in Argentina in 1971 on a budget of $30,000, it depicted the actions of a Manson-esque murder cult, and was shot mainly without sound due to the actors understanding very little English.

American International Pictures

AIPAmerican International TelevisionAmerican International
The film's financier, Jack Bravman, took an out-of-court settlement from American International Pictures to allow it to use the title Slaughter for its Blaxploitation film starring Jim Brown.

Slaughter (1972 film)

Slaughterfilm of the same nameits Blaxploitation film
The film's financier, Jack Bravman, took an out-of-court settlement from American International Pictures to allow it to use the title Slaughter for its Blaxploitation film starring Jim Brown.

Jim Brown

BrownBrown, Jim
The film's financier, Jack Bravman, took an out-of-court settlement from American International Pictures to allow it to use the title Slaughter for its Blaxploitation film starring Jim Brown.

Cinéma vérité

cinema veritevéritécinéma-vérité
He added a new ending, directed in a vérité style by Simon Nuchtern, in which a woman is brutally murdered and dismembered by a film crew, supposedly the crew of Slaughter.

Movie theater

cinemamovie theatrecinemas
Distributor Shackleton reportedly hired fake protesters to picket movie theaters showing the film.

Hoax

hoaxesInternet hoaxhoaxer
Although the film was exposed as a hoax in Variety in 1976, it became popular in New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and Boston.

Variety (magazine)

VarietyDaily VarietyVariety magazine
Although the film was exposed as a hoax in Variety in 1976, it became popular in New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and Boston.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Although the film was exposed as a hoax in Variety in 1976, it became popular in New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and Boston.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
Although the film was exposed as a hoax in Variety in 1976, it became popular in New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and Boston.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CaliforniaLos Angeles, CALos Angeles, United States
Although the film was exposed as a hoax in Variety in 1976, it became popular in New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and Boston.