Social group

groupsocial groupsgroupssocial circlegroup of peoplesocialmembershipmemberscirclegroup structure
In the social sciences, a social group can be defined as two or more people who interact with one another, share similar characteristics, and collectively have a sense of unity.wikipedia
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Society

societiessocialsocietal
For example, a society can be viewed as a large social group.
A society is a group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations.

Kinship

kinship systemsciondescendants
Characteristics shared by members of a group may include interests, values, representations, ethnic or social background, and kinship ties.
Kinship can also refer to a principle by which individuals or groups of individuals are organized into social groups, roles, categories and genealogy by means of kinship terminologies.

Social representation

social representationsrepresentationrepresentations
Characteristics shared by members of a group may include interests, values, representations, ethnic or social background, and kinship ties.
A social representation is a stock of values, ideas, metaphors, beliefs, and practices that are shared among the members of groups and communities.

Dunbar's number

Dunbar’s numbersolving social problems100 to 150 people
According to Dunbar's number, on average, people cannot maintain stable social relationships with more than 150 individuals.
Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restrictive rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group.

Gang

street ganggang violencegangs
Some of the earliest efforts to understand these social units have been the extensive descriptions of urban street gangs in the 1920s and 1930s, continuing through the 1950s, which understood them to be largely reactions to the established authority. Classic examples of groups with high cohesion are fraternities, sororities, gangs, and cults, which are all noted for their recruitment process, especially their initiation or hazing.
A gang is a group of associates, friends or members of a family with a defined leadership and internal organization that identifies with or claims control over territory in a community and engages, either individually or collectively, in illegal, and possibly violent, behavior.

Social identity approach

social identity traditionsocial identitiessocial identity ''approach
Instead, researchers within the social identity tradition generally define it as "a group is defined in terms of those who identify themselves as members of the group".
The social identity approach has been contrasted with the social cohesion approach when it comes to defining social groups.

Identity (social science)

identitysocial identityidentities
The psychological internalization of territorial and dominance experiences in conscious and unconscious memory are established through the formation of social identity, personal identity, body concept, or self concept.
Identity is the qualities, beliefs, personality, looks and/or expressions that make a person (self-identity) or group (particular social category or social group), in psychology.

Interpersonal relationship

relationshiprelationshipsinterpersonal relationships
Here, rather than defining a social group based on expressions of cohesive social relationships between individuals, the social identity model assumes that "psychological group membership has primarily a perceptual or cognitive basis".
Relationships may be regulated by law, custom, or mutual agreement, and form the basis of social groups and of society as a whole.

Organization

organisationorganizationsorganisations
The attention of those who use, participate in, or study groups has focused on functioning groups, on larger organizations, or on the decisions made in these organizations.
Compare the concept of social groups, which may include non-organizations.

Primary and secondary groups

primary groupprimary groupsintimacy group
According to Charles Horton Cooley (1864–1929), a primary group is a small social group whose members share personal and lasting relationships.
A primary group is typically a small social group whose members share close, personal, enduring relationships.

Family

familiesgrandsonfamilial
In the context of human society, a family (from familia) is a group of people related either by consanguinity (by recognized birth), affinity (by marriage or other relationship), or co-residence (as implied by the etymology of the English word "family") or some combination of these.

Reference group

Reference groupsreference
Individuals almost universally have a bond toward what sociologists call reference groups.
A reference group is a group to which an individual or another group is compared.

Tribe

tribaltribestribals
In anthropology, a tribe is a human social group.

Peer group

peerspeerpeer groups
In sociology, a peer group is both a social group and a primary group of people who have similar interests (homophily), age, background, or social status.

Social science

social sciencessocial scientistsocial
In the social sciences, a social group can be defined as two or more people who interact with one another, share similar characteristics, and collectively have a sense of unity.
The field generally concerns the social rules and processes that bind and separate people not only as individuals, but as members of associations, groups, communities and institutions, and includes the examination of the organization and development of human social life.

Group cohesiveness

social cohesiongroup cohesioncohesion
A social group exhibits some degree of social cohesion and is more than a simple collection or aggregate of individuals, such as people waiting at a bus stop, or people waiting in a line.
Group cohesiveness (also called group cohesion and social cohesion) arises when bonds link members of a social group to one another and to the group as a whole.

Cult

cultsreligious cultdestructive cult
Classic examples of groups with high cohesion are fraternities, sororities, gangs, and cults, which are all noted for their recruitment process, especially their initiation or hazing.
In modern English, a cult is a social group that is defined by its unusual religious, spiritual, or philosophical beliefs, or by its common interest in a particular personality, object or goal.

In-group and out-group

ingroupin-groupoutgroup
For example, it has been shown that the mere act of allocating individuals to explicitly random categories is sufficient to lead individuals to act in an ingroup favouring fashion (even where no individual self-interest is possible).
In sociology and social psychology, an in-group is a social group to which a person psychologically identifies as being a member.

Home

domesticresidenceprivate residence
Most commonly, a household is a family unit of some kind, although households may also be other social groups or individuals.

Crowd

mobmobslarge numbers
A crowd is a large group of people that are gathered or considered together.

Group dynamics

group psychologygroup behaviorgroup process
Group dynamics is a system of behaviors and psychological processes occurring within a social group (intragroup dynamics), or between social groups (intergroup dynamics).

Intergroup relations

inter''group dynamicsintergroup behaviorIntergroup interaction
Intergroup relations refers to interactions between individuals in different social groups, and to interactions taking place between the groups themselves collectively.

Team

Team playplayers working togethersquad

Secret society

secret societiessecret organizationsecret
The exact qualifications for labeling a group a secret society are disputed, but definitions generally rely on the degree to which the organization insists on secrecy, and might involve the retention and transmission of secret knowledge, the denial about membership or knowledge of the group, the creation of personal bonds between members of the organization, and the use of secret rites or rituals which solidify members of the group.