Social justice

social injusticeTeaching for social justicesocialfairnessjusticesocially justinjusticesocial and economic justicesocial injusticesequality
Social justice is a concept of fair and just relations between the individual and society.wikipedia
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Equal opportunity

equal opportunitiesequality of opportunityequality
This is measured by the explicit and tacit terms for the distribution of wealth, opportunities for personal activity, and social privileges. The relevant institutions often include taxation, social insurance, public health, public school, public services, labor law and regulation of markets, to ensure fair distribution of wealth, and equal opportunity. Even though the meaning of social justice varies, at least three common elements can be identified in the contemporary theories about it: a duty of the State to distribute certain vital means (such as economic, social, and cultural rights), the protection of human dignity, and affirmative actions to promote equal opportunities for everybody.
The idea is to remove arbitrariness from the selection process and base it on some "pre-agreed basis of fairness, with the assessment process being related to the type of position" and emphasizing procedural and legal means.

Fairness

fairFairness (disambiguation)may be more fair
The relevant institutions often include taxation, social insurance, public health, public school, public services, labor law and regulation of markets, to ensure fair distribution of wealth, and equal opportunity.

International Labour Organization

ILOInternational Labour OfficeInternational Labor Organization
From the early 20th century it was also embedded in international law and institutions; the preamble to establish the International Labour Organization recalled that "universal and lasting peace can be established only if it is based upon social justice."
In 1969, the ILO received the Nobel Peace Prize for improving fraternity and peace among nations, pursuing decent work and justice for workers, and providing technical assistance to other developing nations.

Luigi Taparelli

Luigi Taparelli D’AzeglioLuigi Taparelli D'Azeglio
A Jesuit priest named Luigi Taparelli is typically credited with coining the term, and it spread during the revolutions of 1848 with the work of Antonio Rosmini-Serbati.
Luigi Taparelli (born Prospero Taparelli d'Azeglio; 1793–1862) was an Italian Catholic scholar of the Society of Jesus who coined the term social justice.

A Theory of Justice

theory of justiceA Theory of Justice'' (1999)contractarian “theory of justice”
In the later 20th century, social justice was made central to the philosophy of the social contract, primarily by John Rawls in A Theory of Justice (1971).
A Theory of Justice is a 1971 work of political philosophy and ethics by John Rawls, in which the author addresses the problem of distributive justice (the socially just distribution of goods in a society).

Society of Jesus

JesuitJesuitsS.J.
A Jesuit priest named Luigi Taparelli is typically credited with coining the term, and it spread during the revolutions of 1848 with the work of Antonio Rosmini-Serbati.
The society is characterized by its ministries in the fields of missionary work, human rights, social justice and, most notably, higher education.

Pope Pius XI

Pius XIAchille Rattithe Pope
Thus, in 1931, the Pope Pius XI stated the expression for the first time in the Catholic Social Teaching in the encyclical Quadragesimo Anno.
Pius XI issued numerous encyclicals, including Quadragesimo anno on the 40th anniversary of Pope Leo XIII's groundbreaking social encyclical Rerum novarum, highlighting the capitalistic greed of international finance, the dangers of socialism/communism, and social justice issues, and Quas primas, establishing the feast of Christ the King in response to anti-clericalism.

Catholic social teaching

Social CatholicismCatholic social doctrinesocial teaching
Thus, in 1931, the Pope Pius XI stated the expression for the first time in the Catholic Social Teaching in the encyclical Quadragesimo Anno.
The ideas address oppression, the role of the state, subsidiarity, social organization, concern for social justice, and issues of wealth distribution.

Distributive justice

fairnessdistributiveunfair
Even though the meaning of social justice varies, at least three common elements can be identified in the contemporary theories about it: a duty of the State to distribute certain vital means (such as economic, social, and cultural rights), the protection of human dignity, and affirmative actions to promote equal opportunities for everybody.
Distributive justice concerns the socially just allocation of goods.

Economic inequality

income inequalityinequalitywealth gap
In the current global grassroots movements for social justice, the emphasis has been on the breaking of barriers for social mobility, the creation of safety nets and economic justice.
They also state that social justice requires redistribution of high incomes and large concentrations of wealth in a way that spreads it more widely, in order to "recognise the contribution made by all sections of the community to building the nation's wealth."

Justice

justequitycivil justice
Social justice is a concept of fair and just relations between the individual and society.

Tax

taxationtaxeslevy
The relevant institutions often include taxation, social insurance, public health, public school, public services, labor law and regulation of markets, to ensure fair distribution of wealth, and equal opportunity.
This means that while Geoists also regard taxation as an instrument of social justice, contrary to social democrats and social liberals they do not regard it as an instrument of redistribution but rather a 'predistribution' or simply a correct distribution of the commons.

United Methodist Church

United MethodistMethodistThe United Methodist Church
Today, social justice plays a major role in the United Methodist Church.
Comparatively, the UMC stands to the right of liberal and progressive Protestant groups such as the United Church of Christ and the Episcopal Church on certain issues (especially regarding sexuality), but to the left of historically conservative evangelical traditions such as the Southern Baptists and Pentecostalism, in regard to theological matters such as social justice and Biblical interpretation.

Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action

Vienna Declaration
In 1993, the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action treats social justice as a purpose of human rights education.
The VDPA calls on all States and institutions to include international human rights law, international humanitarian law, democracy and rule of law as subjects in the curricula of all learning institutions in formal and non-formal settings, and, at para 80, that human rights education should include peace, democracy, development and social justice, as set forth in international and regional human rights instruments, in order to achieve common understanding and awareness with a view to strengthening universal commitment to human rights.

Consumerism

consumeristconsumer societymass consumption
For the Muslim Brotherhood the implementation of social justice would require the rejection of consumerism and communism.

Tzedakah

charitytzedakaJewish charity
One of Judaism's most distinctive and challenging ideas is its ethics of responsibility reflected in the concepts of simcha ("gladness" or "joy"), tzedakah ("the religious obligation to perform charity and philanthropic acts"), chesed ("deeds of kindness"), and tikkun olam ("repairing the world").
The word tzedakah is based on the Hebrew (, Tzedek), meaning righteousness, fairness, or justice, and is related to the Hebrew word Tzadik, meaning righteous as an adjective (or righteous individual as a noun in the form of a substantive).

Health equity

health disparitieshealth inequalitieshealth inequality
These social injustices take the form of health inequities when negative health states such as malnourishment, and infectious diseases are more prevalent in impoverished nations.
Inequity implies some kinds of social injustice.

Pope John Paul II

John Paul IIKarol WojtyłaKarol Wojtyla
He campaigned for world debt forgiveness and social justice.

Redistribution of income and wealth

redistribution of wealthincome redistributionwealth redistribution
The report concludes, "Social justice is not possible without strong and coherent redistributive policies conceived and implemented by public agencies."
One basis for redistribution is the concept of distributive justice, whose premise is that money and resources ought to be distributed in such a way as to lead to a socially just, and possibly more financially egalitarian, society.

Climate justice

climate injusticeclimate injustices
The Climate Justice and Environmental Justice movements also incorporate social justice principles, ideas, and practices.
This is done by relating the effects of climate change to concepts of justice, particularly environmental justice and social justice and by examining issues such as equality, human rights, collective rights, and the historical responsibilities for climate change.

Rerum novarum

social-CatholicCatholic encyclicalsgroundbreaking social encyclical
The pope declared that the role of the state is to promote social justice through the protection of rights, while the Church must speak out on social issues in order to teach correct social principles and ensure class harmony (rather than class conflict).

Socialism

socialistsocialistssocialistic
He argued that rival capitalist and socialist theories, based on subjective Cartesian thinking, undermined the unity of society present in Thomistic metaphysics as neither were sufficiently concerned with moral philosophy.
In his Dictionary of Socialism (1924), Angelo S. Rappoport analysed forty definitions of socialism to conclude that common elements of socialism include: general criticisms of the social effects of private ownership and control of capital—as being the cause of poverty, low wages, unemployment, economic and social inequality and a lack of economic security; a general view that the solution to these problems is a form of collective control over the means of production, distribution and exchange (the degree and means of control vary amongst socialist movements); an agreement that the outcome of this collective control should be a society based upon social justice, including social equality, economic protection of people and should provide a more satisfying life for most people.

Affirmative action

positive discriminationemployment equityaffirmative-action
Even though the meaning of social justice varies, at least three common elements can be identified in the contemporary theories about it: a duty of the State to distribute certain vital means (such as economic, social, and cultural rights), the protection of human dignity, and affirmative actions to promote equal opportunities for everybody.

Deus caritas est

God is LoveDeus Est Caritaslove
The encyclical says that social justice is the primary responsibility of politics and the laity; the church itself should inform the debate on social justice with reason guided by faith, but its main social activity should be directed towards charity.

Juan Luis Segundo

Other noted exponents are Leonardo Boff of Brazil, Carlos Mugica of Argentina, Jon Sobrino of El Salvador, and Juan Luis Segundo of Uruguay.
He wrote numerous books on theology, ideology, faith, hermeneutics, and social justice, and was an outspoken critic of what he perceived as Church callousness toward oppression and suffering.