Social network analysis

network analysissocial networking potentialsocial networksocial networksnetworksanalysislink analysismethods for visually depicting social relationshipsSNASNA(Social Network Analysis)
Social network analysis (SNA) is the process of investigating social structures through the use of networks and graph theory.wikipedia
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Graph theory

graphgraphsgraph-theoretic
Social network analysis (SNA) is the process of investigating social structures through the use of networks and graph theory.
Graph theory is also widely used in sociology as a way, for example, to measure actors' prestige or to explore rumor spreading, notably through the use of social network analysis software.

Network theory

network analysisnetworksnetwork
Social network analysis (SNA) is the process of investigating social structures through the use of networks and graph theory.
Social network analysis examines the structure of relationships between social entities.

Edward Laumann

Edward O. LaumannLaumann, Edward O.
Scholars such as Ronald Burt, Kathleen Carley, Mark Granovetter, David Krackhardt, Edward Laumann, Anatol Rapoport, Barry Wellman, Douglas R. White, and Harrison White expanded the use of systematic social network analysis.
He has written extensively on social stratification, urban sociology, organizational sociology, health and aging, and is widely recognized as a pioneer in the areas of social network analysis and the sociology of sexuality.

David Krackhardt

Scholars such as Ronald Burt, Kathleen Carley, Mark Granovetter, David Krackhardt, Edward Laumann, Anatol Rapoport, Barry Wellman, Douglas R. White, and Harrison White expanded the use of systematic social network analysis.
He is notable for being the author of KrackPlot, a network visualization software designed for social network analysis which is widely used in academic research.

Centrality

degree centralityClosenesscentral
Centrality: Centrality refers to a group of metrics that aim to quantify the "importance" or "influence" (in a variety of senses) of a particular node (or group) within a network. Examples of common methods of measuring "centrality" include betweenness centrality, closeness centrality, eigenvector centrality, alpha centrality, and degree centrality.
Centrality concepts were first developed in social network analysis, and many of the terms used to measure centrality reflect their sociological origin.

Social network

networknetworkingnetworks
Social Networking Potential (SNP) is a numeric coefficient, derived through algorithms to represent both the size of an individual's social network and their ability to influence that network.
The study of these structures uses social network analysis to identify local and global patterns, locate influential entities, and examine network dynamics.

Net-map toolbox

An example of a pen-and-paper network mapping approach, which also includes the collection of some actor attributes (perceived influence and goals of actors) is the * Net-map toolbox.
The net-map toolbox is a social network analysis tool that uses interviews and mapping to help people understand, visualize, discuss, and improve situations in which many different actors influence outcomes.

Alpha centrality

Examples of common methods of measuring "centrality" include betweenness centrality, closeness centrality, eigenvector centrality, alpha centrality, and degree centrality.
In graph theory and social network analysis, alpha centrality is a measure of centrality of nodes within a graph.

Barry Wellman

Networked individualism
Scholars such as Ronald Burt, Kathleen Carley, Mark Granovetter, David Krackhardt, Edward Laumann, Anatol Rapoport, Barry Wellman, Douglas R. White, and Harrison White expanded the use of systematic social network analysis.
Until 1990, he focused on community sociology and social network analysis.

Balance theory

cognitive balanceBalanceHeider balance theory
According to balance theory, balanced graphs represent a group of people who are unlikely to change their opinions of the other people in the group.
In social network analysis, balance theory is the extension proposed by Frank Harary and Dorwin Cartwright.

Viral marketing

viralviral advertisingviral campaign
By calculating the SNP of respondents and by targeting High SNP respondents, the strength and relevance of quantitative marketing research used to drive viral marketing strategies is enhanced.
The ultimate goal of marketers interested in creating successful viral marketing programs is to create viral messages that appeal to individuals with high social networking potential (SNP) and that have a high probability of being presented and spread by these individuals and their competitors in their communications with others in a short period.

Social network analysis software

list of SNA softwarenetwork analysis softwareSocial network analysis tools
It has also gained a significant following in anthropology, biology, demography, communication studies, economics, geography, history, information science, organizational studies, political science, public health, social psychology, development studies, sociolinguistics, and computer science and is now commonly available as a consumer tool (see the list of SNA software).

Kathleen Carley

Kathleen M. Carley
Scholars such as Ronald Burt, Kathleen Carley, Mark Granovetter, David Krackhardt, Edward Laumann, Anatol Rapoport, Barry Wellman, Douglas R. White, and Harrison White expanded the use of systematic social network analysis.

Ronald Stuart Burt

Ronald BurtRonald S. Burt
Scholars such as Ronald Burt, Kathleen Carley, Mark Granovetter, David Krackhardt, Edward Laumann, Anatol Rapoport, Barry Wellman, Douglas R. White, and Harrison White expanded the use of systematic social network analysis.
He is the author of several books on sociology, organization behavior and network analysis, including Structural Holes: The Social Structure of Competition (Harvard University Press, 1992) and Brokerage and Closure: An Introduction to Social Capital (Oxford University Press, 2005) His research has been published in numerous academic journals, including Administrative Science Quarterly, American Journal of Sociology, Journal of Organization Behavior, Organization Science, Social Networks, Sociological Inquiry, and others.

Mathematical sociology

mathematical sociologistMathematical theorymathematically
Social network analysis is the best-known contribution of this subfield to sociology as a whole and to the scientific community at large.

Dynamic network analysis

dynamic networkdynamic networks of interactionsNetwork analysis
Dynamic network analysis (DNA) is an emergent scientific field that brings together traditional social network analysis (SNA), link analysis (LA), social simulation and multi-agent systems (MAS) within network science and network theory.

Harrison White

Harrison C. WhiteHarrison Colyar Whiterevolution
Scholars such as Ronald Burt, Kathleen Carley, Mark Granovetter, David Krackhardt, Edward Laumann, Anatol Rapoport, Barry Wellman, Douglas R. White, and Harrison White expanded the use of systematic social network analysis.

Network-based diffusion analysis

Network-based diffusion analysis (NBDA) is a statistical tool to detect and quantify social transmission of information or a behaviour in social networks (SNA, etc.).

Network science

networksnetworkdiameter
Moreno claimed that "before the advent of sociometry no one knew what the interpersonal structure of a group 'precisely' looked like (Moreno, 1953). The sociogram was a representation of the social structure of a group of elementary school students. The boys were friends of boys and the girls were friends of girls with the exception of one boy who said he liked a single girl. The feeling was not reciprocated. This network representation of social structure was found so intriguing that it was printed in The New York Times (April 3, 1933, page 17). The sociogram has found many applications and has grown into the field of social network analysis.

Social media mining

social media marketing
Social media mining is based on theories and methodologies from social network analysis, network science, sociology, ethnography, optimization and mathematics.

Computer and network surveillance

Computer surveillanceInternet surveillanceinternet monitoring
The National Security Agency (NSA) uses its clandestine mass electronic surveillance programs to generate the data needed to perform this type of analysis on terrorist cells and other networks deemed relevant to national security.
One common form of surveillance is to create maps of social networks based on data from social networking sites as well as from traffic analysis information from phone call records such as those in the NSA call database, and internet traffic data gathered under CALEA.

Social marketing intelligence

alpha usersocial intelligence company
A closely related term is Alpha User, defined as a person with a high SNP.

Mass surveillance

surveillance statesurveillance societysurveillance
The National Security Agency (NSA) uses its clandestine mass electronic surveillance programs to generate the data needed to perform this type of analysis on terrorist cells and other networks deemed relevant to national security.
They have also performed extensive analysis of social networks such as Myspace.

Sociomapping

Sociomapping of small systems produces similar results to social network analysis with additional visualization features.