Socialist Republic of Croatia

SR CroatiaCroatiaPR CroatiaPeople's Republic of CroatiaFederal State of CroatiaCroatianFS CroatiaRepublic of CroatiaCROPeople’s Republic of Croatia
The Socialist Republic of Croatia (Socijalistička Republika Hrvatska) was a constituent republic and federated state of Yugoslavia.wikipedia
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Independence of Croatia

Croatia declared independence from YugoslaviaindependenceCroatia declared its independence
The newly elected government of Franjo Tuđman moved the republic towards independence, formally seceding from Yugoslavia in 1991 and thereby contributing to its dissolution.
The Independence of Croatia was a process started with the changes in the political system and the constitutional changes in 1990 that transformed the Socialist Republic of Croatia into the Republic of Croatia, which in turn proclaimed the Christmas Constitution, and held the 1991 Croatian independence referendum.

Franjo Tuđman

Franjo TudjmanTuđmanHorrors of War: Historical Reality and Philosophy
The newly elected government of Franjo Tuđman moved the republic towards independence, formally seceding from Yugoslavia in 1991 and thereby contributing to its dissolution. As Milošević and his clique rode the wave of Serbian nationalism across Yugoslavia, talking about battles to be fought for Serbdom, emerging Croatian leader Franjo Tuđman reciprocated with talk about making Croatia a nation state.
HDZ won the first Croatian parliamentary elections in 1990 and Tuđman became the President of the Presidency of SR Croatia.

Breakup of Yugoslavia

dissolution of Yugoslaviabreak-up of Yugoslaviabreakup
The newly elected government of Franjo Tuđman moved the republic towards independence, formally seceding from Yugoslavia in 1991 and thereby contributing to its dissolution.
After the Allied victory in World War II, Yugoslavia was set up as a federation of six republics, with borders drawn along ethnic and historical lines: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Socialist Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia.

Socialist Republic of Serbia

SR SerbiaPR SerbiaSerbia
By territory and population, it was the second largest republic in Yugoslavia, after the Socialist Republic of Serbia.
The events were condemned by the communist governments of the western Yugoslav republics (especially SR Slovenia and SR Croatia), who successfully resisted the attempts to expand the revolt onto their territories, and turned against Milošević.

Constitution of Croatia

Croatian ConstitutionConstitutionChristmas Constitution
On December 22, 1990, a new Constitution was adopted, under which the Socialist Republic of Croatia was simply renamed as the Republic of Croatia.
While it was part of the socialist Yugoslavia, the Socialist Republic of Croatia had its own Constitution under the Constitution of Yugoslavia.

Dalmatia

Dalmatian coastDalmatianDalmatian Islands
In the first years of the war, Yugoslav Partisans in Croatia did not have considerable support of Croats, with an exception of Croats in the Croatian region of Dalmatia.
After the Austro-Hungarian defeat in the First World War, Dalmatia was split between the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes which controlled most of it, and the Kingdom of Italy which held several smaller parts, and after World War II, the Socialist Republic of Croatia as a part of Yugoslavia took complete control over the area.

Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

SFR YugoslaviaYugoslaviaFPR Yugoslavia
The Socialist Republic of Croatia (Socijalistička Republika Hrvatska) was a constituent republic and federated state of Yugoslavia.
The nation was a socialist state and a federation governed by the League of Communists of Yugoslavia and made up of six socialist republics: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia with Belgrade as its capital.

1990 Croatian parliamentary election

electoral defeatfirst multi-party elections1990
After the first multi-party parliamentary elections held in April 1990, the Parliament made various constitutional changes and dropped the prefix "socialist" from the official name, so the "Socialist Republic of Croatia" became simply the "Republic of Croatia" (RH).
Parliamentary elections were held in the Socialist Republic of Croatia between 22 and 23 April 1990; the second round of voting occurred on 6–7 May.

State Anti-fascist Council for the National Liberation of Croatia

ZAVNOHNational Anti-Fascist Council of the People's Liberation of Croatia (ZAVNOH)President of the ZAVNOH
Croatia became part of the Yugoslav federation in 1943 after the Second Session of the AVNOJ and through the resolutions of the ZAVNOH, Croatia's wartime deliberative body. The first post-war President of the Socialist Republic of Croatia was Vladimir Nazor (actually President of the Presidium of the Parliament of the People's Republic of Croatia), who was, during the war, Chairman of the State Antifascist Council of the People's Liberation of Croatia (ZAVNOH), while the first Prime Minister was Vladimir Bakarić.

Vladimir Nazor

Nazor
Its first president was Vladimir Nazor. The first post-war President of the Socialist Republic of Croatia was Vladimir Nazor (actually President of the Presidium of the Parliament of the People's Republic of Croatia), who was, during the war, Chairman of the State Antifascist Council of the People's Liberation of Croatia (ZAVNOH), while the first Prime Minister was Vladimir Bakarić.
After the war, he became the first president of the People's Republic of Croatia's Parliament (President of the Presidium of the People's Assembly), and thus the first head-of-state of the modern Croatian state in the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia.

1991 Croatian independence referendum

Croatian independence referendumindependence referendumCroatia
It was under this Constitution that the independence would be proclaimed on 25 June 1991 (after the Croatian independence referendum held on 19 May 1991).
After World War II, Croatia became a one-party socialist federal unit of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

Democratic Federal Yugoslavia

YugoslaviaDF YugoslaviaYugoslav
Yugoslavia was then called the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia (Demokratska Federativna Jugoslavija, DFJ), it was not a constitutionally socialist state, or even a republic, in anticipation of the conclusion of the war, when these issues were settled.

Prljavo kazalište

Mladen BodalecJasenko HouraDavorin Bogović
On October 17, 1989, the rock group Prljavo kazalište held a major concert before almost 250,000 people on the central Zagreb city square.
Prljavo kazalište was formed in 1977 in Dubrava, part of Zagreb, the capital of the then SR Croatia.

League of Communists of Croatia

Communist Party of CroatiaCroatian Communist Partycommunist
The main organ was the Politburo of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Croatia (from 1952 the League of Communists of Croatia) made of around ten persons.
League of Communists of Croatia (Savez komunista Hrvatske or SKH) was the Croatian branch of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia (SKJ).

Ante Marković

Ante MarkovicAntePrime Minister Marković
Ante Marković, a Bosnian Croat who was at the time the Croatian Prime Minister, said that Croatia will lose around $800 million because of that law.
In 1986 he became president of the Presidency of Socialist Republic of Croatia replacing Ema Derosi-Bjelajac.

Vladimir Bakarić

Bakarić
The first post-war President of the Socialist Republic of Croatia was Vladimir Nazor (actually President of the Presidium of the Parliament of the People's Republic of Croatia), who was, during the war, Chairman of the State Antifascist Council of the People's Liberation of Croatia (ZAVNOH), while the first Prime Minister was Vladimir Bakarić.

Zagreb

Zagreb, CroatiaCity of ZagrebZagreb, Yugoslavia
On October 17, 1989, the rock group Prljavo kazalište held a major concert before almost 250,000 people on the central Zagreb city square.
From 1945 until 1990, Zagreb was the capital of the Socialist Republic of Croatia, one of the six constituent socialist republics of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

Yugoslavia

YugoslavJugoslaviaHistory of Yugoslavia
As Milošević and his clique rode the wave of Serbian nationalism across Yugoslavia, talking about battles to be fought for Serbdom, emerging Croatian leader Franjo Tuđman reciprocated with talk about making Croatia a nation state.
The six constituent republics that made up the SFRY were the SR Bosnia and Herzegovina, SR Croatia, SR Macedonia, SR Montenegro, SR Serbia, and SR Slovenia.

Croatia

Republic of CroatiaCroatianCRO
By its constitution, modern-day Croatia is its direct continuation.
This led to the creation of the Federal State of Croatia, which after the war became a founding member and constituent of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

Ivica Račan

Ivica RacanRačanPrime Minister Račan
This caused first the Slovenian and then Croatian delegations (led by Milan Kučan and Ivica Račan, respectively) to leave the Congress in protest and marked a culmination in the rift of the ruling party.
Račan entered politics in the Socialist Republic of Croatia in 1961 as a member of the League of Communists of Croatia (SKH), the Croatian branch of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia (SKJ).

Independent State of Croatia

CroatiaNDHCroatian
Soon after they gained power, the Communists started to persecute former officials of the Independent State of Croatia in order to compromise them to the general public.
In 1944, the third year of the war in Yugoslavia, Croats formed 61% of the Partisan operational units originating from the Federal State of Croatia.

Yugoslav People's Army

Yugoslav ArmyJNAYugoslav National Army
In March 1991, the Yugoslav People's Army met with the Presidency of Yugoslavia (an eight-member council composed of representatives from six republics and two autonomous provinces) in an attempt to get them to declare a state of emergency which would allow for the army to take control of the country.
The regions were: Belgrade (responsible for eastern Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina), Zagreb (Slovenia and northern Croatia), Skopje (Macedonia, Southern Serbia and Montenegro) and Split Naval Region.

SANU Memorandum

Memorandum of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Artsmemorandum1986 Memorandum
The growing crisis in Kosovo, the nationalist memorandum of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, the emergence of Slobodan Milošević as the leader of Serbia, and everything else that followed provoked a very negative reaction in Croatia.

League of Communists of Yugoslavia

Communist Party of YugoslaviaCommunist PartyPresident of the Presidium of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia
In 1990, the government dismantled the single-party system of government – installed by the Communist Party – and adopted a multi-party democracy.

Miroslav Navratil

Friedrich Navratil
On 6 June 1946, the Supreme Court of the SR Croatia sentenced some of the leading officials of the NDH, including Slavko Kvaternik, Vladimir Košak, Miroslav Navratil, Ivan Perčević, Mehmed Alajbegović, Osman Kulenović and others.