Socialist mode of production

socialismsocialistsocialist societyMarxist socialismMarxian socialismMarxian socialistsSocialism (Marxism)socialist systemlower-phase communismRed socialism
In Marxist theory, the socialist mode of production (also referred to as lower-stage of communism or simply socialism, as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels used the terms socialism and communism interchangeably) refers to a specific historical phase of economic development and its corresponding set of social relations that emerge from capitalism in the schema of historical materialism.wikipedia
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Karl Marx

MarxMarx, KarlMarxist
In Marxist theory, the socialist mode of production (also referred to as lower-stage of communism or simply socialism, as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels used the terms socialism and communism interchangeably) refers to a specific historical phase of economic development and its corresponding set of social relations that emerge from capitalism in the schema of historical materialism.
Employing a critical approach known as historical materialism, Marx predicted that, like previous socio-economic systems, capitalism produced internal tensions which would lead to its self-destruction and replacement by a new system known as socialism.

Production for use

directly for usefor usedirectly produce for use
Marxist production for use is coordinated through conscious economic planning.
This criterion is used to distinguish socialism from capitalism, and was one of the fundamental defining characteristics of socialism initially shared by Marxian socialists, evolutionary socialists, social anarchists and Christian socialists.

Communist society

stateless communismcommunismpure communism
In Marxist theory, the socialist mode of production (also referred to as lower-stage of communism or simply socialism, as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels used the terms socialism and communism interchangeably) refers to a specific historical phase of economic development and its corresponding set of social relations that emerge from capitalism in the schema of historical materialism.
In this respect communism is differentiated from socialism, which, out of economic necessity, restricts access to articles of consumption and services based on one's contribution.

Socialist calculation debate

Economic calculation debateeconomic calculation argumentobjectively determined
The Marxist view of socialism served as a point of reference during the socialist calculation debate.
The socialist calculation debate, sometimes known as the economic calculation debate, was a discourse on the subject of how a socialist economy would perform economic calculation given the absence of the law of value, money, financial prices for capital goods and private ownership of the means of production.

Vladimir Lenin

LeninV. I. LeninVladimir Ilyich Lenin
The term 'socialism' was popularized during the Russian Revolution by Vladimir Lenin.
Encouraging insurrection during Russia's failed Revolution of 1905, he later campaigned for the First World War to be transformed into a Europe-wide proletarian revolution, which as a Marxist he believed would cause the overthrow of capitalism and its replacement with socialism.

Socialist economics

socialist economysocialistsocialist economies
Although Marx and Engels wrote very little on socialism and neglected to provide any details on how it might be organized, numerous social scientists and neoclassical economists have used Marx's theory as a basis for developing their own models of socialist economic systems.
A socialist economy is a system of production where goods and services are produced directly for use, in contrast to a capitalist economic system, where goods and services are produced to generate profit (and therefore indirectly for use).

Scientific socialism

scientific socialistsocialismScientific
In Marxist theory, the socialist mode of production (also referred to as lower-stage of communism or simply socialism, as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels used the terms socialism and communism interchangeably) refers to a specific historical phase of economic development and its corresponding set of social relations that emerge from capitalism in the schema of historical materialism.

Capitalist mode of production (Marxist theory)

capitalist mode of productioncapitalismcapitalist
In Marxist theory, the socialist mode of production (also referred to as lower-stage of communism or simply socialism, as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels used the terms socialism and communism interchangeably) refers to a specific historical phase of economic development and its corresponding set of social relations that emerge from capitalism in the schema of historical materialism.

Socialism

socialistsocialistssocialistic
The Marxian conception of socialism stands in contrast to other early conceptions of socialism, most notably early forms of market socialism based on classical economics such as mutualism and Ricardian socialism.
Marxists argue that the establishment of a socialist mode of production is the only way to overcome these deficiencies.

Capital accumulation

accumulation of capitalaccumulationLaw of accumulation
The accumulation of capital is rendered insufficient in socialism.
In Marxist thought, socialism would succeed capitalism as the dominant mode of production when the accumulation of capital can no longer sustain itself due to falling rates of profit in real production relative to increasing productivity.

Marxism

MarxistMarxistsMarxist ideology
In Marxist theory, the socialist mode of production (also referred to as lower-stage of communism or simply socialism, as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels used the terms socialism and communism interchangeably) refers to a specific historical phase of economic development and its corresponding set of social relations that emerge from capitalism in the schema of historical materialism.
The socialist system would succeed capitalism as humanity's mode of production through workers' revolution.

Yellow socialism

yellow
It was an economic system proposed in 1902 by Pierre Biétry, as an alternative to the "Red socialism" advocated in Marxism.

Primary stage of socialism

preliminary or "primary stage" of developing socialismpreliminary stage of socialismsocialism
Xue wrote that within the socialist mode of production there were several phases and for China to reach an advanced form of socialism it had to focus on developing the productive forces.

Mode of production

modes of productionproductionarticulation
The Marxist definition of socialism is a mode of production where the sole criterion for production is use-value and therefore the law of value no longer directs economic activity.

Friedrich Engels

EngelsFrederick EngelsFrederich Engels
In Marxist theory, the socialist mode of production (also referred to as lower-stage of communism or simply socialism, as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels used the terms socialism and communism interchangeably) refers to a specific historical phase of economic development and its corresponding set of social relations that emerge from capitalism in the schema of historical materialism.

Historical materialism

materialist conception of historyhistorical materialistMarx's theory of history
In Marxist theory, the socialist mode of production (also referred to as lower-stage of communism or simply socialism, as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels used the terms socialism and communism interchangeably) refers to a specific historical phase of economic development and its corresponding set of social relations that emerge from capitalism in the schema of historical materialism.

Law of value

economic lawslaws of capitalism
Therefore, the law of value no longer directs economic activity.

Economic planning

central planningcentralized planningplanning
Marxist production for use is coordinated through conscious economic planning.

To each according to his contribution

from each according to his ability, to each according to his workranked according to his or her capacities and rewarded according to his or her workaccording to individual contribution
Distribution of products is based on the principle of "to each according to his contribution".

Proletariat

proletarianproletariansworking class
The social relations of socialism are characterized by the proletariat effectively controlling the means of production, either through cooperative enterprises or by public ownership or private artisanal tools and self-management.

Means of production

productive propertydifferent organizations of productionforces
The social relations of socialism are characterized by the proletariat effectively controlling the means of production, either through cooperative enterprises or by public ownership or private artisanal tools and self-management.

State ownership

state-ownedpublic ownershipstate owned
The social relations of socialism are characterized by the proletariat effectively controlling the means of production, either through cooperative enterprises or by public ownership or private artisanal tools and self-management.

Organizational Self-management

workers' self-managementself-managementautogestion
The social relations of socialism are characterized by the proletariat effectively controlling the means of production, either through cooperative enterprises or by public ownership or private artisanal tools and self-management.

Surplus value

surplus-valueexploitationsurplus
Surplus value, thus, goes to the working class and hence society as a whole.