Sociality

gregarioussocial animalsolitarysocialsocial animalssolitary animalgregarious behaviourgregariousnessgregariouslysolitary but social
Sociality is the degree to which individuals in an animal population tend to associate in social groups (gregariousness) and form cooperative societies.wikipedia
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Eusociality

eusocialsocial insectssocial insect
The highest degree of sociality recognized by sociobiologists is eusociality.
Eusociality (from Greek εὖ eu "good" and social), the highest level of organization of sociality, is defined by the following characteristics: cooperative brood care (including care of offspring from other individuals), overlapping generations within a colony of adults, and a division of labor into reproductive and non-reproductive groups.

Society

societiessocialsocietal
Sociality is the degree to which individuals in an animal population tend to associate in social groups (gregariousness) and form cooperative societies.
The great apes have always been more (Bonobo, Homo, Pan) or less (Gorilla, Pongo) social animals, so Robinson Crusoe-like situations are either fictions or unusual corner cases to the ubiquity of social context for humans, who fall between presocial and eusocial in the spectrum of animal ethology.

Embioptera

webspinnerEmbiidinawebspinners
Webspinners are gregarious, living subsocially in galleries of fine silk which they spin from glands on their forelegs.

Parental investment

parental careinvestmaternal care
This wasp behaviour evidences the most fundamental characteristic of animal sociality: parental investment.
The human need to have a birth attendant also requires sociality.

Human

humanshuman beinghuman beings
E. O. Wilson and Bert Hölldobler controversially claimed in 2005 that humans exhibit sufficient sociality to be counted as a eusocial species, and that this enabled them to enjoy spectacular ecological success and dominance over ecological competitors.
A terrestrial animal, humans are characterized by their erect posture and bipedal locomotion; high manual dexterity and heavy tool use compared to other animals; open-ended and complex language use compared to other animal communications; larger, more complex brains than other animals; and highly advanced and organized societies.

Bee

beessolitary beeAnthophila
Common examples of eusociality are from Hymenoptera (ants, bees, sawflies, and wasps) and Blattodea (infraorder Isoptera, termites), but some Coleoptera (such as the beetle Austroplatypus incompertus), Hemiptera (bugs such as Pemphigus spyrothecae), and Thysanoptera (thrips) are described as eusocial.
In some species, groups of cohabiting females may be sisters, and if there is a division of labour within the group, they are considered semisocial.

Orangutan

orangutansorang-utanPongo
Solitary-but-social species include mouse lemurs, lorises, and orangutans.
The social structure of the orangutan can be best described as solitary but social.

Strepsirrhini

strepsirrhinestrepsirrhinesstrepsirhine
Among primates, this form of social organization is most common among the nocturnal strepsirrhine species and tarsiers.
Because of this social diversity among these solitary but social primates, whose level of social interaction is comparable to that of diurnal simians, alternative classifications have been proposed to emphasize their gregarious, dispersed, or solitary nature.

Animal

Animaliaanimalsmetazoa
Sociality is the degree to which individuals in an animal population tend to associate in social groups (gregariousness) and form cooperative societies.

Population

populationspopulacepopulated
Sociality is the degree to which individuals in an animal population tend to associate in social groups (gregariousness) and form cooperative societies.

Social group

groupsocial groupsgroups
Sociality is the degree to which individuals in an animal population tend to associate in social groups (gregariousness) and form cooperative societies.

Evolutionary pressure

selective pressureselection pressureselection pressures
Sociality is a survival response to evolutionary pressures.

Wasp

waspssocial waspvespine
For example, when a mother wasp stays near her larvae in the nest, parasites are less likely to eat the larvae.

Larva

larvaelarvalgrubs
For example, when a mother wasp stays near her larvae in the nest, parasites are less likely to eat the larvae.

Parasitism

parasiteparasiticparasites
For example, when a mother wasp stays near her larvae in the nest, parasites are less likely to eat the larvae.

Predation

predatorypredatorprey
Biologists suspect that pressures from parasites and other predators selected this behavior in wasps of the family Vespidae.

Natural selection

selectionselectiveselected
Biologists suspect that pressures from parasites and other predators selected this behavior in wasps of the family Vespidae.

Family (biology)

familyfamiliessubfamily
Biologists suspect that pressures from parasites and other predators selected this behavior in wasps of the family Vespidae.

Vespidae

vespidvespid waspsVespid wasp
Biologists suspect that pressures from parasites and other predators selected this behavior in wasps of the family Vespidae.

Resource

resourceslimited resourceassets
Parental investment is any expenditure of resources (time, energy, social capital) to benefit one's offspring.

Social capital

goodwillsocialcapital
Parental investment is any expenditure of resources (time, energy, social capital) to benefit one's offspring.

Offspring

broodprogenybroods
Parental investment is any expenditure of resources (time, energy, social capital) to benefit one's offspring.

Family

familiesgrandsonfamilial
Parental investment detracts from a parent's capacity to invest in future reproduction and aid to kin (including other offspring).

Overlapping generations

overlapping adult generations
A eusocial taxon is one that exhibits overlapping adult generations, reproductive division of labor, cooperative care of young, and—in the most refined cases—a biological caste system.

Reproduction

reproductiveprocreationreproduce
A eusocial taxon is one that exhibits overlapping adult generations, reproductive division of labor, cooperative care of young, and—in the most refined cases—a biological caste system.