Socialization

socialisationsocializingsocializedsocializesocialisedlanguage socializationsocialisingsociabilitysocial obligationsocialise
In sociology, socialization is the process of internalizing the norms and ideologies of society.wikipedia
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Culture

culturalculturesculturally
Socialization encompasses both learning and teaching and is thus "the means by which social and cultural continuity are attained".
Humans acquire culture through the learning processes of enculturation and socialization, which is shown by the diversity of cultures across societies.

Internalization (sociology)

internalizedInternalizationinternalize
In sociology, socialization is the process of internalizing the norms and ideologies of society.
In sociology and other social sciences, internalization ([[American and British English spelling differences#-ise.2C -ize .28-isation.2C -ization.29|or]] internalisation) means an individual's acceptance of a set of norms and values (established by others) through socialisation.

Social norm

social normsnormsnorm
In sociology, socialization is the process of internalizing the norms and ideologies of society.
Norms in every culture create conformity that allows for people to become socialized to the culture in which they live.

Sociology

sociologistsociologicalsociologists
In sociology, socialization is the process of internalizing the norms and ideologies of society.
Though neither the production process nor the critique of aesthetic forms is in the remit of sociologists, analyses of socializing factors, such as ideological effects and audience reception, stem from sociological theory and method.

Gender role

gender rolesgender stereotypesgender norms
Henslin (1999:76) contends that "an important part of socialization is the learning of culturally defined gender roles."
In the sociology of gender, the process whereby an individual learns and acquires a gender role in society is termed gender socialization.

Talcott Parsons

ParsonsParsonianParsons, Talcot
The term was relatively uncommon before 1940, but became popular after World War II, appearing in dictionaries and scholarly works such as the theory of Talcott Parsons.
In 1956, he published a major work, Family, Socialization and Interaction Process, which explored the way in which psychology and psychoanalysis bounce into the theories of motivation and socialization, as well into the question of kinship, which for Parsons established the fundamental axis for that subsystem he later would call "the social community."

Tabula rasa

blank slatetabulae rasaeblank tablet
Socialization provides only a partial explanation for human beliefs and behaviors, maintaining that agents are not blank slates predetermined by their environment; scientific research provides evidence that people are shaped by both social influences and genes.
This observed behaviour cannot be attributed to any current form of socialization or social construction.

Enculturation

enculturatedcultural conditioningenculturate
They discovered that the processes of enculturation and socialization do not occur apart from the process of language acquisition, but that children acquire language and culture together in what amounts to an integrated process.
Enculturation is related to socialization.

Stereotype

stereotypesstereotypicalstereotyping
In peer group activities, stereotypic gender roles may also be rejected, renegotiated or artfully exploited for a variety of purposes.
Another explanation says that people are socialised to adopt the same stereotypes.

Bambi Schieffelin

Bambi B. SchieffelinSchieffelin, Bambi
Based on comparative research in different societies, focusing on the role of language in child development, linguistic anthropologists Elinor Ochs and Bambi Schieffelin have developed the theory of language socialization.
She has written extensively about language socialization, language contact, language ideology, Haitian Creole, and missionization.

Linguistic anthropology

linguistic anthropologistlinguistic anthropologistslinguistic
Based on comparative research in different societies, focusing on the role of language in child development, linguistic anthropologists Elinor Ochs and Bambi Schieffelin have developed the theory of language socialization.
In a series of studies, linguistic anthropologists Elinor Ochs and Bambi Schieffelin addressed the anthropological topic of socialization (the process by which infants, children, and foreigners become members of a community, learning to participate in its culture), using linguistic and other ethnographic methods.

Social constructionism

social constructionsocially constructedsocial constructionist
This observed behavior cannot be contributed to any current form of socialization or social construction.
The numerous realities so formed comprise, according to this view, the imagined worlds of human social existence and activity, gradually crystallized by habit into institutions propped up by language conventions, given ongoing legitimacy by mythology, religion and philosophy, maintained by therapies and socialization, and subjectively internalized by upbringing and education to become part of the identity of social citizens.

Elinor Ochs

Based on comparative research in different societies, focusing on the role of language in child development, linguistic anthropologists Elinor Ochs and Bambi Schieffelin have developed the theory of language socialization.
Together with Bambi Schieffelin, Professor Ochs developed language socialization, a field of inquiry which examines the ways in which individuals become competent members of communities of practice to and through the use of language.

Nature versus nurture

nature and nurturenurturenature vs. nurture
Socialization provides only a partial explanation for human beliefs and behaviors, maintaining that agents are not blank slates predetermined by their environment; scientific research provides evidence that people are shaped by both social influences and genes.
This observed behavior cannot be contributed to any current form of socialization or social construction.

Ideology

ideologicalideologiespolitical ideology
In sociology, socialization is the process of internalizing the norms and ideologies of society.

Society

societiessocialsocietal
In sociology, socialization is the process of internalizing the norms and ideologies of society. Notions of society and the state of nature have existed for centuries.

Developmental psychology

developmental psychologistchild psychologychild psychologist
Socialization is strongly connected to developmental psychology.

Morality

moralmoralsmoral code
Socialization may lead to desirable outcomes—sometimes labeled "moral"—as regards the society where it occurs.

Consensus decision-making

consensusconsensus builderagreement
Individual views are influenced by the society's consensus and usually tend toward what that society finds acceptable or "normal".

Agency (sociology)

agencysocial actoragents
Socialization provides only a partial explanation for human beliefs and behaviors, maintaining that agents are not blank slates predetermined by their environment; scientific research provides evidence that people are shaped by both social influences and genes.

Genetics

geneticgeneticistgenetically
Socialization provides only a partial explanation for human beliefs and behaviors, maintaining that agents are not blank slates predetermined by their environment; scientific research provides evidence that people are shaped by both social influences and genes.

Gene–environment correlation

Gene-environment correlationgene environment correlationgenotype-environment correlation
Genetic studies have shown that a person's environment interacts with his or her genotype to influence behavioral outcomes.

State of nature

natural statenatural condition of mankindnatural man
Notions of society and the state of nature have existed for centuries.

Socialism

socialistsocialistssocialistic
In its earliest usages, socialization was simply the act of socializing or another word for socialism.

Social relation

social interactionsocial relationssocial interactions
Socialization is thus both a cause and an effect of association.