Solomon

King SolomonSalomonSolomonic magicS'''olomonSolomonicSulaymanBiblical, King of Israel, Son of Davidking SolomanKing Solomon of IsraelKing Solomon of Israel and Judah
Solomon (, Shlomoh), also called Jedidiah (Hebrew Yedidyah), was, according to the Hebrew Bible, Old Testament, Quran, and Hadiths, a fabulously wealthy and wise king of Israel who succeeded his father, King David.wikipedia
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Testament of Solomon

writings
Solomon is the subject of many other later references and legends, most notably in the 1st-century apocryphal work known as the Testament of Solomon.
The Testament of Solomon is a pseudepigraphical work ascribed to King Solomon and so associated with the Old Testament, but not regarded as scripture by Jews or Christian groups.

Rehoboam

King Rehoboam of JudahSolomon's heir Rehoboam, King of the Hebrews
His sins included idolatry, marrying foreign women and, ultimately, turning away from Yahweh, and they led to the kingdom's being torn in two during the reign of his son Rehoboam.
He was a son of and the successor to Solomon, and a grandson of David.

Kingdom of Judah

Judahking of JudahJudahite
He is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, which would break apart into the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah shortly after his death.
According to the Hebrew Bible, the kingdom of Judah resulted from the break-up of the United Kingdom of Israel (1020 to about 930 BCE) after the northern tribes refused to accept Rehoboam, the son of Solomon, as their king.

David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
Solomon (, Shlomoh), also called Jedidiah (Hebrew Yedidyah), was, according to the Hebrew Bible, Old Testament, Quran, and Hadiths, a fabulously wealthy and wise king of Israel who succeeded his father, King David. Solomon was born in Jerusalem, the second born child of David and his wife Bathsheba, widow of Uriah the Hittite.
Before his peaceful death, he chooses his son Solomon as successor.

Kingdom of Israel (Samaria)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelnorthern Kingdom of Israel
He is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, which would break apart into the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah shortly after his death.
After the death of Solomon in about 931 BCE, all the Israelite tribes except for Judah and Benjamin (called the ten northern tribes) refused to accept Rehoboam, the son and successor of Solomon, as their king.

Solomon in Islam

SolomonSulaymanSulaymān
In the Quran, he is considered a major prophet, and Muslims generally refer to him by the Arabic variant Sulayman, son of David.
Islam views Solomon as one of the elect of God, who was bestowed upon with many God-given gifts, including the ability to speak to animals and rule jinn.

Bathsheba

Bathsheba at her ToiletBathsheba in the bathBatsheva
Solomon was born in Jerusalem, the second born child of David and his wife Bathsheba, widow of Uriah the Hittite.
She was the mother of Solomon, who succeeded David as king, making her the Queen mother.

Jerusalem

QudsJerusalem, Israelal-Quds
Solomon was born in Jerusalem, the second born child of David and his wife Bathsheba, widow of Uriah the Hittite.
According to the Bible, King David conquered the city from the Jebusites and established it as the capital of the united kingdom of Israel, and his son, King Solomon, commissioned the building of the First Temple.

Judgment of Solomon

Biblical story of King Solomoncut the bike in half, so Elaine and Kramer can both have itcut the princess and their child in half
Perhaps the best known story of his wisdom is the Judgment of Solomon; two women each lay claim to being the mother of the same child.
The Judgment of Solomon is a story from the Hebrew Bible in which King Solomon of Israel ruled between two women both claiming to be the mother of a child.

Ophir

gold of OphirOphyr
In particular he continued his father's very profitable relationship with the Phoenician king Hiram I of Tyre (see 'wealth' below); they sent out joint expeditions to the lands of Tarshish and Ophir to engage in the trade of luxury products, importing gold, silver, sandalwood, pearls, ivory, apes and peacocks.
King Solomon received a cargo from Ophir every three years, which consisted of gold, silver, sandalwood, pearls, ivory, apes, and peacocks.

Davidic line

House of DavidDavidic dynastyDavidic
Regarding the Davidic dynasty, to which King Solomon belongs, its chronology can be checked against datable Babylonian and Assyrian records at a few points, and these correspondences have allowed archaeologists to date its kings in a modern framework.
After the death of David's son, King Solomon, the ten northern tribes of the Kingdom of Israel rejected the Davidic line, refusing to accept Solomon's son, Rehoboam, and instead chose as king Jeroboam and formed the northern Kingdom of Israel.

Prophets in Judaism

ProphetsprophetProphets of Israel
According to the Talmud, Solomon is one of the 48 prophets.
14) Solomon

Book of Proverbs

ProverbsProv.Proverbs of Solomon
Solomon was traditionally considered the author of several biblical books, "including not only the collections of Proverbs, but also of Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon and the later apocryphal book the Wisdom of Solomon."
The Book of Proverbs (Hebrew: מִשְלֵי, Míshlê (Shlomoh), "Proverbs (of Solomon)") is the second book of the third section (called Writings) of the Hebrew Bible and a book of the Christian Old Testament.

Š-L-M

salaamSalamsalām
His two names mean "peaceful" and "friend of God", both appropriate to the story of his rule.
Given names derived from the same root include Solomon (Süleyman), Absalom, Selim, Salem, Salim, Salma, Salmah, Salman, Selimah, Shelimah, Salome, etc.

Throne of Solomon

ThroneSolomon's throne
Solomon's throne is said to have been a spectacle, seeing that it was one of the earliest mechanical devices built by man.
The Throne of Solomon is the throne of King Solomon in the Hebrew Bible, and is a motif in Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

Kings of Israel and Judah

kings of Israelking of Israelking
Solomon (, Shlomoh), also called Jedidiah (Hebrew Yedidyah), was, according to the Hebrew Bible, Old Testament, Quran, and Hadiths, a fabulously wealthy and wise king of Israel who succeeded his father, King David.
Solomon (c. 970–930 BCE)

Nathan (son of David)

NathanDavid's son NathanNathan the son of David.
Solomon had three named full brothers born to Bathsheba: Nathan, Shammua, and Shobab, besides six known older half-brothers born of as many mothers.
He was a younger brother of Shammuah (sometimes referred to as Shammua or Shimea), Shobab, and an older brother of Solomon.

Ecclesiastes

Book of EcclesiastesKohelethQohelet
Solomon was traditionally considered the author of several biblical books, "including not only the collections of Proverbs, but also of Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon and the later apocryphal book the Wisdom of Solomon."
In traditional Jewish texts, King Solomon is named as the author, although modern scholars reject this.

Gezer

GazruSiege of GezerTel Gezer
More archaeological success has been achieved with the major cities Solomon is said to have strengthened or rebuilt, for example, Hazor, Megiddo and Gezer.
In the Hebrew Bible, Gezer is associated with Joshua and Solomon.

David in Islam

DawudDavidDawood
In the Quran, he is considered a major prophet, and Muslims generally refer to him by the Arabic variant Sulayman, son of David.
In both lists his name appears next to that of his son Solomon.

Wisdom

sapientsapiencewise
He is portrayed as great in wisdom, wealth and power beyond either of the previous kings of the country, but also as a king who sinned.
It is named after King Solomon, the third leader of the Jewish Kingdom, who has shown a great deal of wisdom when making judgments about other people's dilemmas but lacked insight when it came to important decisions in his own life.

Amulet

talismanamuletscharms
In later years, in mostly non-biblical circles, Solomon also came to be known as a magician and an exorcist, with numerous amulets and medallion seals dating from the Hellenistic period invoking his name.
Amulets are plentiful in the Jewish tradition, with examples of Solomon-era amulets existing in many museums.

Tarshish

Tar-Tharsis
In particular he continued his father's very profitable relationship with the Phoenician king Hiram I of Tyre (see 'wealth' below); they sent out joint expeditions to the lands of Tarshish and Ophir to engage in the trade of luxury products, importing gold, silver, sandalwood, pearls, ivory, apes and peacocks.
1 Kings notes that King Solomon had "a fleet of ships of Tarshish" at sea with the fleet of his ally King Hiram of Tyre. And that "Once every three years the fleet of ships of Tarshish used to come bringing gold, silver, ivory, apes, and peacocks." (repeated with some notable changes in 2 Chronicles ), while 1 Kings 22:48 states that "Jehoshaphat made ships of Tarshish to go to Ophir for gold, but they did not go, for the ships were wrecked at Ezion-geber." This is repeated in 2 Chronicles 20:37 preceded by the information that the ships were actually built at Ezion-geber, and emphasizing the prophecy of the otherwise unknown Eliezer son of Dodavahu of Mareshah against Jehoshaphat that "Because you have joined with Ahaziah, the Lord will destroy what you have made." And the ships were wrecked and were not able to go to Tarshish. This may be referenced in Psalm 48:7 which records "By the east wind you shattered the ships of Tarshish." From these verses commentators consider that "Ships of Tarshish" was used to denote any large trading ships intended for long voyages whatever their destination, and some Bible translations, including the NIV, go as far as to translate the phrase ship(s) of Tarshish as "trading ship(s)."

Queen of Sheba

ShebaThe Queen of ShebaMakeda
The Ethiopian tradition has a detailed account of the affair.
In the original story, she brings a caravan of valuable gifts for King Solomon.

Books of Chronicles

1 ChroniclesChronicles2 Chronicles
The life of Solomon is primarily described in the second Book of Samuel, and by 1 Chronicles and 1 Kings.
The next long section concerns David's son Solomon (2 Chronicles 1–9), and the final part is concerned with the Kingdom of Judah with occasional references to the second kingdom of Israel (2 Chronicles 10–36).