Sonoma, California

SonomaSonoma, CACity of SonomaSonoma Sonoma CASonoma, California, USAthe present-day City of Sonoma
Sonoma is a city in Sonoma County's Sonoma Valley, in California's Wine Country.wikipedia
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Sonoma County, California

Sonoma CountySonomaSonoma Counties
Sonoma is a city in Sonoma County's Sonoma Valley, in California's Wine Country.
The Mission San Francisco Solano, founded in 1823 as the last and northernmost of 21 California missions, is in the present City of Sonoma, at the northern end of El Camino Real.

California wine

CaliforniaCalifornianCalifornian wine
Today, Sonoma is a center of California's wine industry in the Sonoma Valley AVA Appellation.
The first commercial winery in California, Buena Vista Winery, was founded in 1857 by Agoston Haraszthy and is located in Sonoma, California.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
Sonoma is a city in Sonoma County's Sonoma Valley, in California's Wine Country.
In 1846, a group of American settlers in and around Sonoma rebelled against Mexican rule during the Bear Flag Revolt.

Wine Country (California)

Wine CountryCalifornia Wine CountryCalifornia's Wine Country
Sonoma is a city in Sonoma County's Sonoma Valley, in California's Wine Country.
Cities and towns associated with the Wine Country include Santa Rosa, Healdsburg, Sonoma, Kenwood, Petaluma, Sebastopol, Guerneville, Windsor, Geyserville, and Cloverdale in Sonoma County; Napa, Yountville, Rutherford, St. Helena and Calistoga in Napa County; and Hopland and Ukiah in Mendocino County.

Sonoma Valley

SonomaValley of the Moon
Sonoma is a city in Sonoma County's Sonoma Valley, in California's Wine Country.
The area includes the incorporated city of Sonoma and part of the City of Santa Rosa, as well as numerous unincorporated communities, including Kenwood and Glen Ellen near Santa Rosa and, near Sonoma, El Verano, Boyes Hot Springs, Fetters Hot Springs, and Agua Caliente.

Mexican secularization act of 1833

secularizationsecularizedAn Act for the Secularization of the Missions of California
Governor José Figueroa's naming of Lieutenant Vallejo as the administrator to secularize the Mission was part of a larger plan.
The El Camino Real road connected the missions from San Diego to Mission San Francisco Solano, in Sonoma, a length of 529 mi.

Alta California

Mexican CaliforniaCaliforniaUpper California
Although Sonoma had been founded as a pueblo in 1835, it remained under military control, lacking the political structures of municipal self-government of other Alta California pueblos.
Neither Spain nor Mexico ever colonized the area beyond the southern and central coastal areas of present-day California, and small areas of present-day Arizona, so they exerted no effective control in modern-day California north of the Sonoma area, or east of the California Coast Ranges.

Mission San Francisco Solano (California)

Mission San Francisco SolanoMission San Francisco de SolanoSan Francisco Solano
Mission San Francisco Solano was the predecessor of the Pueblo of Sonoma. This plaza is surrounded by many historical buildings, including the Mission San Francisco Solano, Captain Salvador Vallejo's Casa Grande, the Presidio of Sonoma, the Blue Wing Inn, the Sebastiani Theatre, and the Toscano Hotel. Sonoma is also considered the birthplace of wine-making in California, dating back to the original vineyards of Mission San Francisco Solano, with improvements made by Agoston Haraszthy, the father of California viticulture and credited with introduction of the Zinfandel/Primitivo grape varietal.
The mission building is now part of the Sonoma State Historic Park and is located in the city of Sonoma, California.

Sonoma International Film Festival

Sonoma Valley Film FestivalSonoma Film Festival2011 Sonoma Film Festival
Sonoma is similarly known as the home of the Sonoma International Film Festival and for its historic town plaza, a remnant of the town's Mexican colonial past.
Film presentations are held at a variety of venues including the historic Sebastiani Theater on the Sonoma town plaza.

Blue Wing Inn

pulqueria (tavern)
This plaza is surrounded by many historical buildings, including the Mission San Francisco Solano, Captain Salvador Vallejo's Casa Grande, the Presidio of Sonoma, the Blue Wing Inn, the Sebastiani Theatre, and the Toscano Hotel.
The Blue Wing Inn in Sonoma, California, was one of the first hotels built in the state north of San Francisco.

Agoston Haraszthy

Attila HaraszthyÁgoston Haraszthy
Sonoma is also considered the birthplace of wine-making in California, dating back to the original vineyards of Mission San Francisco Solano, with improvements made by Agoston Haraszthy, the father of California viticulture and credited with introduction of the Zinfandel/Primitivo grape varietal.
One of the first men to plant vineyards in Wisconsin, he was the founder of the Buena Vista Winery in Sonoma, California, and an early writer on California wine and viticulture.

Sonoma Creek

Sonoma Creek Watershed
The principal watercourse in the town is Sonoma Creek, which flows in a southerly direction to discharge ultimately to the Napa Sonoma Marsh; Arroyo Seco Creek is a tributary to Schell Creek with a confluence in the eastern portion of the town.
In the city of Sonoma it is an urban creek which emerges into agricultural areas to the south.

Jacob P. Leese

A town council (ayuntamiento) was established in 1844 and Jacob P. Leese was named first alcalde, and Cayetano Juarez second alcalde.
Leese continued the business alone until 1841, when he sold out to the Hudson's Bay Company and transferred his business and residence to Sonoma.

George C. Yount

George YountGeorge Calvert YountYount
In 1834, George C. Yount, the first Euro-American permanent settler in the Napa Valley, was employed as a carpenter by General Vallejo.
He went to Sonoma in 1834, where he was employed as a carpenter by General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo.

Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo

Mariano VallejoGeneral VallejoSalvador Vallejo
This plaza is surrounded by many historical buildings, including the Mission San Francisco Solano, Captain Salvador Vallejo's Casa Grande, the Presidio of Sonoma, the Blue Wing Inn, the Sebastiani Theatre, and the Toscano Hotel. The commander of the Company of the National Presidio at San Francisco (Compania de Presidio Nacional de San Francisco), Lieutenant Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo was appointed administrator (comisionado) to oversee the closing of Mission San Francisco Solano.
Vallejo laid out the town of Sonoma in 1835.

Mexican–American War

Mexican-American WarMexican WarMexican American War
Mexican officials were concerned about the coming war with the United States coupled with the growing influx of American immigrants into California.
On June 14, 1846, 34 American settlers seized control of the undefended Mexican government outpost of Sonoma to forestall Castro's plans.

William B. Ide

William Brown IdeWilliam Ide
William Ide gave an impassioned speech urging the rebels to stay in Sonoma and start a new republic.
On June 14, Ide and the others seized the pueblo of Sonoma and captured the Mexican Commandante of Northern California, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, who in fact supported American annexation.

Californio

CaliforniosCaliforniaCalifornian
Political factions backed different Sonoma alcaldes (John H. Nash, supported by American immigrants, and Lilburn Boggs supported by Vallejo and the Californios) made the situation more complex.
He founded the towns of Sonoma, California and Petaluma, California, owned Mare Island and the future town site of Benicia, California and was granted the 66622 acre Rancho Petaluma, the 84000 acre Rancho Suscol and other properties by Governor José Figueroa in 1834 and later.

Suisun people

SuisunesSuisunSuisun Indians
It is near the northeast corner of the territory claimed by the Coast Miwok, with Southern Pomo to the northwest, Wappo to the northeast, Suisunes and Patwin peoples to the east.
In 1823, Sem-Yeto and the Suisun people at Mission San Francisco moved into the new mission in the town of Sonoma, California, the Mission San Francisco de Solano, to help build and populate this final Franciscan mission built north of the San Francisco Bay.

Rancho Petaluma

Petaluma
The Governor granted Lieutenant Vallejo the initial lands (approximately 44000 acre) of Rancho Petaluma immediately west of Sonoma.
Although Vallejo's rancho was centered on Petaluma, he made his home in Sonoma.

Santa Rosa, California

Santa RosaSanta Rosa, CACity of Santa Rosa
California State Route 12 is the main route in Sonoma, passing through the populated areas of the Sonoma Valley and connecting it to Santa Rosa to the north and Napa to the east.
The first known permanent European settlement of Santa Rosa was the homestead of the Carrillo family, in-laws to Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, who settled the Sonoma pueblo and Petaluma area.

Napa, California

NapaNapa, CACity of Napa
California State Route 12 is the main route in Sonoma, passing through the populated areas of the Sonoma Valley and connecting it to Santa Rosa to the north and Napa to the east.
Padre José Altimira, founder of Mission San Francisco Solano in Sonoma, led the expedition.

Petaluma, California

PetalumaPetaluma, CACity of Petaluma
State routes 121 and 116 run to the south of town, passing through the unincorporated area of Schellville and connecting Sonoma Valley to Napa, Petaluma to the west, and Marin County to the south.
In 1836, Vallejo ordered construction of his Rancho Petaluma Adobe a ranch house in Petaluma, which his family often used as a summer home, while he resided in the neighboring town of Sonoma.

Arroyo Seco Creek

The principal watercourse in the town is Sonoma Creek, which flows in a southerly direction to discharge ultimately to the Napa Sonoma Marsh; Arroyo Seco Creek is a tributary to Schell Creek with a confluence in the eastern portion of the town.
Arroyo Seco Creek springs near the Napa County line about 4 mi northeast of Sonoma, California.

Lilburn Boggs

Lilburn W. BoggsGovernor BoggsGovernor Bogg
Political factions backed different Sonoma alcaldes (John H. Nash, supported by American immigrants, and Lilburn Boggs supported by Vallejo and the Californios) made the situation more complex.
They arrived in Sonoma, California in November and were provided refuge by Mariano Vallejo at his Petaluma ranch house.