Sophia (wisdom)

SophiaWisdomSapientiaWisdom of GodHoly WisdomGod's WisdomDivine WisdomEternal Wisdomgoddess of wisdomHis wisdom
Sophia ( sophía "wisdom") is a central idea in Hellenistic philosophy and religion, Platonism, Gnosticism, and Christian theology.wikipedia
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Philosophy

philosophicalphilosopherhistory of philosophy
Originally carrying a meaning of "cleverness, skill", the later meaning of the term, close to the meaning of Phronesis ("wisdom, intelligence"), was significantly shaped by the term philosophy ("love of wisdom") as used by Plato.
Philosophy (from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom") is the study of general and fundamental questions about existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.

Holy Wisdom

Divine Wisdomhagia sophiaHoly Wisdom of God
In the Eastern Orthodox and the Catholic churches, Holy Wisdom (Ἁγία Σοφία Hagía Sophía) is an expression for God the Son (Jesus) in the Trinity (as in the dedication of the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople) and, rarely, for the Holy Spirit.
Christian theology received the Old Testament personification of Wisdom (Hebrew Chokhmah) as well as the concept of Wisdom (Sophia) from Greek philosophy, especially Platonism.

Wisdom

sapientsapiencewise
Sophia ( sophía "wisdom") is a central idea in Hellenistic philosophy and religion, Platonism, Gnosticism, and Christian theology.
To Socrates and Plato, philosophy was literally the love of wisdom (philo-sophia).

Hagia Sophia

Haghia SophiaHagia Sophia MosqueAyasofya
In the Eastern Orthodox and the Catholic churches, Holy Wisdom (Ἁγία Σοφία Hagía Sophía) is an expression for God the Son (Jesus) in the Trinity (as in the dedication of the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople) and, rarely, for the Holy Spirit.
The church was dedicated to the Wisdom of God, the Logos, the second person of the Trinity, its patronal feast taking place on 25 December, the commemoration of the birth of the incarnation of the Logos in Christ.

Trinity

Holy TrinityTrinitarianTrinitarianism
In the Eastern Orthodox and the Catholic churches, Holy Wisdom (Ἁγία Σοφία Hagía Sophía) is an expression for God the Son (Jesus) in the Trinity (as in the dedication of the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople) and, rarely, for the Holy Spirit.
In like manner also the three days which were before the luminaries, are types of the Trinity [Τριάδος], of God, and His Word, and His wisdom.

Chokhmah

ChochmahChokmahChochma
References to Sophia in Koine Greek translations of the Hebrew Bible translate to the Hebrew term Chokhmah.
Chokmâh (חָכְמָה,חכמה ISO 259 or khok-maw') is the Biblical Hebrew word rendered as "wisdom" in English Bible versions (LXX σοφία sophia, Vulgate sapientia).

Phronesis

phronēsispractical wisdomφρόνησις
Originally carrying a meaning of "cleverness, skill", the later meaning of the term, close to the meaning of Phronesis ("wisdom, intelligence"), was significantly shaped by the term philosophy ("love of wisdom") as used by Plato. Before Plato, the term for "sound judgement, intelligence, practical wisdom" and so on, such qualities as are ascribed to the Seven Sages of Greece, was phronesis, from phren, while sophia referred to technical skill.
In the 6th book of his Nicomachean Ethics, Plato's student and friend Aristotle famously distinguished between two intellectual virtues: sophia (wisdom) and phronesis, and described the relationship between them and other intellectual virtues.

Seven Sages of Greece

Seven Sagesseven wise menSeven Wise Men of Greece
Before Plato, the term for "sound judgement, intelligence, practical wisdom" and so on, such qualities as are ascribed to the Seven Sages of Greece, was phronesis, from phren, while sophia referred to technical skill.
The Seven Sages (of Greece) or Seven Wise Men (Greek: οἱ ἑπτὰ σοφοί hoi hepta sophoi) was the title given by classical Greek tradition to seven philosophers, statesmen, and law-givers of the 6th century BC who were renowned for their wisdom.

Cardinal virtues

cardinalcardinal virtuefour cardinal virtues
Sophia is named as one of the four cardinal virtues (in place of phronesis) in Plato's Protagoras.

Hellenistic Judaism

Hellenistic JewishHellenized JewsHellenistic Jews
Philo, a Hellenized Jew writing in Alexandria, attempted to harmonize Platonic philosophy and Jewish scripture.
Consequently, Hellenistic Judaism emphasized monotheistic doctrine (heis theos), and represented reason (logos) and wisdom (sophia) as emanations from God.

Gospel of John

JohnJohn's GospelFourth Gospel
Also influenced by Stoic philosophical concepts, he used the Koine term logos for the role and function of Wisdom, a concept later adapted by the author of the Gospel of John in the opening verses and applied to Jesus as the Word (Logos) of God the Father.
In this sense, it was similar to the Hebrew concept of Wisdom, God's companion and intimate helper in creation.

Saints Faith, Hope and Charity

Faith, Hope and CharitySophia of MilanFaith, Hope, and Charity
There is a hagiographical tradition, dating to the late sixth century, of a Saint Sophia and her three daughters, Saints Faith, Hope and Charity.
Saints Faith, Hope and Charity (Fides, Spes et Caritas, New Testament Greek: Πίστις, Ἐλπίς καὶ Ἀγάπη Pistis, Elpis, and Agape, Church Slavonic: Вѣра, Надежда, Любовь Věra, Nadežda, Ljubov) are a group of Christian martyred saints, venerated together with their mother, Sophia ("Wisdom").

Jane Leade

Jane LeadLeade
Within the Protestant tradition in England, Jane Leade, seventeenth-century Christian mystic, Universalist, and founder of the Philadelphian Society, wrote copious descriptions of her visions and dialogues with the "Virgin Sophia" who, she said, revealed to her the spiritual workings of the Universe.
It was at this time, however, that she had her first vision of the "Virgin Sophia", the Feminine Aspect of God which is described in the Book of Proverbs in the Bible, who promised to unfold the secrets of the universe to her.

Sophia (given name)

SophiaSophia the MartyrSofia
Sophia, also spelled Sofia, is a feminine given name, from Greek Σοφία, Sophía, "Wisdom".

Irenaeus

Irenaeus of LyonsSt. IrenaeusIrenæus
Irenaeus represents another, minor patristic tradition which identified the Spirit of God, and not Christ himself, as "Wisdom" (Adversus haereses, 4.20.1–3; cf.
For the Valentinians, the material world is the result of the loss of perfection which resulted from Sophia's desire to understand the Forefather.

Sophist

sophistssophistrySophism
Socratic skepticism is contrasted with the approach of the sophists, who are attacked in Gorgias for relying merely on eloquence.
The Greek σοφός (sophos), related to the noun σοφία (sophia), had the meaning "skilled" or "wise" since the time of the poet Homer and originally was used to describe anyone with expertise in a specific domain of knowledge or craft.

Sofia

Sofia, BulgariaSofia MunicipalitySerdica
There is a monumental sculpture of Holy Wisdom depicted as a "goddess" in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria (the city itself is named after Saint Sofia Church).
The origin is in the Greek word sophia "wisdom".

Logos

λόγοςWordWord of God
Also influenced by Stoic philosophical concepts, he used the Koine term logos for the role and function of Wisdom, a concept later adapted by the author of the Gospel of John in the opening verses and applied to Jesus as the Word (Logos) of God the Father.

Nous

noesisnoeticIntellect
Thus, in the Library of Celsus in Ephesus, built in the 2nd century, there are four statues of female allegories, depicting wisdom (Sophia), knowledge (Episteme), intelligence (Ennoia) and valour (Arete).
This he explains after first comparing the four other truth revealing capacities of soul: technical know how (technē), logically deduced knowledge (epistēmē, sometimes translated as "scientific knowledge"), practical wisdom (phronēsis), and lastly theoretical wisdom (sophia), which is defined by Aristotle as the combination of nous and epistēmē.

Harmony Society

HarmonistRappitesHarmonites
Jakob Böhme was very influential to a number of Christian mystics and religious leaders, including George Rapp and the Harmony Society.
They also practiced forms of Esoteric Christianity, Mysticism (Christian mysticism), and Rapp often spoke of the virgin spirit or Goddess named Sophia in his writings.

Philadelphians

Philadelphian SocietyPhiladelphianBlack Philadelphians
Within the Protestant tradition in England, Jane Leade, seventeenth-century Christian mystic, Universalist, and founder of the Philadelphian Society, wrote copious descriptions of her visions and dialogues with the "Virgin Sophia" who, she said, revealed to her the spiritual workings of the Universe.
Together, the group held views that were somewhat similar to Panentheism, regarding the belief in the presence of God in all things, and with a Nondualist component, in that they also believed the presence of the Holy Spirit exists in each and everyone's soul, and that one can become enlightened and illuminated by living a virtuous life and seeking truth through the wisdom of God.

Vladimir Solovyov (philosopher)

Vladimir SolovyovVladimir SolovievSolovyov
Such interpretations became popular in the late nineteenth to early twentienth centuries, forwarded by authors such as Vladimir Solovyov, Pavel Florensky, Nikolai Berdyaev, and Sergei Bulgakov.
His religious philosophy was syncretic and fused philosophical elements of various religious traditions with Orthodox Christianity and his own experience of Sophia.

Names and titles of Jesus in the New Testament

Holy SaviourName of JesusSan Salvatore
In the Latin Church, however, "the Word" or Logos came through more clearly than "the Wisdom" of God as a central, high title of Christ.

The Dinner Party

Dinner PartyJudy Chicago's 'Dinner Party
The 1979 installation artwork The Dinner Party features a place setting for Sophia.
6. Sophia

George Rapp

Johann Georg RappGeorg RappRappist
Jakob Böhme was very influential to a number of Christian mystics and religious leaders, including George Rapp and the Harmony Society.
Rapp and his group also practiced forms of Esoteric Christianity, Mysticism (Christian mysticism), and Rapp often spoke of the virgin spirit or Goddess named Sophia in his writings.