Sophia Dorothea of Celle

Sophia Dorothea of Brunswick-Lüneburg-CelleSophie DorotheaDuchess Sophia Dorothea of Brunswick-Cellemother-in-lawSophiaSophia DorotheaSophia Dorothea of Brunswick-LüneburgSophia Dorothea, Princess of CelleSophia of AhldenSophia of Celle
Sophia Dorothea of Celle (15 September 1666 – 13 November 1726) was the repudiated wife of future King George I of Great Britain, and mother of George II. The union with her first cousin was an arranged marriage of state, instigated by the machinations of his mother, Sophia of Hanover.wikipedia
67 Related Articles

George II of Great Britain

George IIKing George IIPrince of Wales
Sophia Dorothea of Celle (15 September 1666 – 13 November 1726) was the repudiated wife of future King George I of Great Britain, and mother of George II.
George was born in the city of Hanover in Germany, and was the son of George Louis, Hereditary Prince of Brunswick-Lüneburg (later King George I of Great Britain), and his wife, Sophia Dorothea of Celle.

George I of Great Britain

George IKing George IKing George
Sophia Dorothea of Celle (15 September 1666 – 13 November 1726) was the repudiated wife of future King George I of Great Britain, and mother of George II. (a name by which he was known in Hanover), and threw against the wall a miniature of George Louis brought for her by Duchess Sophia.
George's surviving uncle, George William of Celle, had married his mistress in order to legitimise his only daughter, Sophia Dorothea, but looked unlikely to have any further children.

Philip Christoph von Königsmarck

Count of KönigsmarckLieutenant KönigsmarckPhilip Christoph
She is best remembered for her alleged affair with Philip Christoph von Königsmarck that led to her being imprisoned in the Castle of Ahlden for the last thirty years of her life.
He was allegedly the lover of Sophia Dorothea, Princess of Celle, the wife of Duke George Louis of Brunswick and Lüneburg, the heir presumptive of the Principality of Calenberg, later to become Elector of Hanover (as George I Louis, 1708) and King of Great Britain (as George I, 1714).

George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg

George WilliamDuke George WilliamDuke George William of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Sophia Dorothea was born on 15 September 1666, the only child of George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg by his long-term mistress, Eleonore d'Esmier d'Olbreuse (1639–1722), Countess of Williamsburg, a Huguenot lady, the daughter of Alexander II d'Esmiers, Marquess of Olbreuse. In 1705 he would inherit the Principality of Lüneburg after the death of his father-in-law and uncle, George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and in 1714 the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland and became King George I of Great Britain through his mother, Duchess Sophia, a granddaughter of James VI and I.
George William was the father of Sophia Dorothea of Celle, wife of George I of Great Britain.

Sophia of Hanover

Sophia, Electress of HanoverSophiaElectress Sophia
The union with her first cousin was an arranged marriage of state, instigated by the machinations of his mother, Sophia of Hanover.
Sophia was, at first, against the marriage of her son and Sophia Dorothea of Celle, looking down on Sophia Dorothea's mother (who was not of royal birth and who Sophia referred to as "mouse dirt mixed among the pepper") and concerned by Sophia Dorothea's legitimated status, but was eventually won over by the advantages inherent in the marriage.

Sophia Dorothea of Hanover

Sophia DorotheaQueen of PrussiaPrincess Sophia Dorothea of Hanover
Sophia Dorothea, born 1686, later wife of King Frederick William I of Prussia, and mother of Frederick the Great
She was the only daughter of George Louis of Hanover, later King George I of Great Britain, and his wife Sophia Dorothea of Celle.

Marriage of state

political marriagemarriage alliancemarriages of state
The union with her first cousin was an arranged marriage of state, instigated by the machinations of his mother, Sophia of Hanover.
The Princess Sophia's dowry included properties assuring an income of 100,000 thalers annually, which led to George Louis, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (the future George I of Great Britain), marrying his first cousin Sophia Dorothea of Celle—when both were pressed into the arrangement by his mother— and that German ducal dynastic move accidentally gave the couple the inside track on the Protestant thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland (and later, those of the United Kingdom and Ireland).

Ahlden House

She is best remembered for her alleged affair with Philip Christoph von Königsmarck that led to her being imprisoned in the Castle of Ahlden for the last thirty years of her life. With the agreement of her father, George had Sophia Dorothea imprisoned in Ahlden House in her native Celle, where she stayed until she died more than thirty years later.
It is principally known as the place of imprisonment of Sophia Dorothea of Celle, otherwise Sophie Dorothea of Brunswick-Lüneburg, wife of George I of Great Britain and the mother of George II of Great Britain.

Principality of Lüneburg

LüneburgPrince of LüneburgBrunswick-Lüneburg
In 1705 he would inherit the Principality of Lüneburg after the death of his father-in-law and uncle, George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and in 1714 the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland and became King George I of Great Britain through his mother, Duchess Sophia, a granddaughter of James VI and I.
After his death in 1705, George of Hanover, who married his daughter Sophie Dorothea later known as the "Princess of Ahlden", inherited the state of Lüneburg, which was merged into the Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg and finally lost its independence.

Melusine von der Schulenburg, Duchess of Kendal

Melusine von der SchulenburgDuchess of KendalDuchess of Munster
But George Louis acquired a mistress, Melusine von der Schulenburg, and started pointedly neglecting his wife.
Robert Walpole said of her that she was "as much the queen of England as anyone was" (George's wife Sophia had been kept in imprisonment since their divorce in 1694).

Saraband for Dead Lovers

Sarabandfilmed in 1948Saraband aka Saraband for Dead Lovers
Sophia Dorothea's affair and its tragic outcome is the basis of the 1948 British film Saraband for Dead Lovers.
Set in seventeenth-century Hanover, it depicts the doomed romance between Philip Christoph von Königsmarck and Sophia Dorothea of Celle, the wife of the Elector of Hanover.

Frederick William I of Prussia

Frederick William IFriedrich Wilhelm IFrederick William
Sophia Dorothea, born 1686, later wife of King Frederick William I of Prussia, and mother of Frederick the Great
Frederick William married his first cousin Sophia Dorothea of Hanover, George II's younger sister (daughter of his uncle, King George I of Great Britain and Sophia Dorothea of Celle) on 28 November 1706.

Éléonore Desmier d'Olbreuse

Countess EleanoreEleanor, Countess of Wilhelmsburg
Sophia Dorothea was born on 15 September 1666, the only child of George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg by his long-term mistress, Eleonore d'Esmier d'Olbreuse (1639–1722), Countess of Williamsburg, a Huguenot lady, the daughter of Alexander II d'Esmiers, Marquess of Olbreuse.
She was the mother of Sophia Dorothea of Celle, who was the wife of George I.

Celle

Celle, GermanyCity of CelleEicklingen
With the agreement of her father, George had Sophia Dorothea imprisoned in Ahlden House in her native Celle, where she stayed until she died more than thirty years later.
Sophia Dorothea of Celle (1666–1726) – wife of George I of Great Britain and mother of George II of Great Britain

William Henry Wilkins

W. H. WilkinsW.H. Wilkins
W. H. Wilkins, The Love of an Uncrowned Queen (London, 1900)
At Lund University in Sweden Wilkins discovered in 1897 the unpublished correspondence between Sophia Dorothea of Celle, the consort of George I, and her lover, Count Philip Christopher Königsmarck.

Huguenots

HuguenotFrench HuguenotFrench Huguenots
Sophia Dorothea was born on 15 September 1666, the only child of George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg by his long-term mistress, Eleonore d'Esmier d'Olbreuse (1639–1722), Countess of Williamsburg, a Huguenot lady, the daughter of Alexander II d'Esmiers, Marquess of Olbreuse.

Morganatic marriage

morganaticmorganaticallymorganatic wife
George William eventually married Eleonore officially in 1676 (they had been married morganatically previously).

Hanover

HannoverHanover, GermanyHannover, Germany
(a name by which he was known in Hanover), and threw against the wall a miniature of George Louis brought for her by Duchess Sophia.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
In 1705 he would inherit the Principality of Lüneburg after the death of his father-in-law and uncle, George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and in 1714 the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland and became King George I of Great Britain through his mother, Duchess Sophia, a granddaughter of James VI and I.

Kingdom of Ireland

IrelandIrishCrown
In 1705 he would inherit the Principality of Lüneburg after the death of his father-in-law and uncle, George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and in 1714 the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland and became King George I of Great Britain through his mother, Duchess Sophia, a granddaughter of James VI and I.

James VI and I

James IJames VIKing James I
In 1705 he would inherit the Principality of Lüneburg after the death of his father-in-law and uncle, George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and in 1714 the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland and became King George I of Great Britain through his mother, Duchess Sophia, a granddaughter of James VI and I.

Elizabeth Charlotte, Madame Palatine

Elizabeth CharlotteDuchess of OrléansPrincess Palatine
The desire for the marriage was almost purely financial, as Duchess Sophia wrote to her niece Elizabeth Charlotte, "One hundred thousand thalers a year is a goodly sum to pocket, without speaking of a pretty wife, who will find a match in my son George Louis, the most pigheaded, stubborn boy who ever lived, who has round his brains such a thick crust that I defy any man or woman ever to discover what is in them. He does not care much for the match itself, but one hundred thousand thalers a year have tempted him as they would have tempted anybody else".

Thaler

talerthalersjoachimsthaler
The desire for the marriage was almost purely financial, as Duchess Sophia wrote to her niece Elizabeth Charlotte, "One hundred thousand thalers a year is a goodly sum to pocket, without speaking of a pretty wife, who will find a match in my son George Louis, the most pigheaded, stubborn boy who ever lived, who has round his brains such a thick crust that I defy any man or woman ever to discover what is in them. He does not care much for the match itself, but one hundred thousand thalers a year have tempted him as they would have tempted anybody else".

Frederick the Great

Frederick IIFrederick II of PrussiaFrederick
Sophia Dorothea, born 1686, later wife of King Frederick William I of Prussia, and mother of Frederick the Great

Leine

River LeineLeine depressionLeine River
According to diplomatic sources from Hanover's enemies, in July 1694 the Swedish count was killed, possibly with the connivance of George, and his body thrown into the river Leine weighted with stones.