Sorbs

SorbianSorbLusatian SorbsLusatian Serbs (Sorbs)LusatiansSorbian peopleWendsLower SorbsLusatianLusatian Serbs
Sorbs (, Serby, Sorben, also known by their former autonyms Lusatians and Wends) are a West Slavic ethnic group predominantly inhabiting Lusatia, a region divided between Germany (the states of Saxony and Brandenburg) and Poland (the provinces of Lower Silesia and Lubusz).wikipedia
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Lusatia

LausitzUpper LusatiaUpper Lusatian
Sorbs (, Serby, Sorben, also known by their former autonyms Lusatians and Wends) are a West Slavic ethnic group predominantly inhabiting Lusatia, a region divided between Germany (the states of Saxony and Brandenburg) and Poland (the provinces of Lower Silesia and Lubusz). In 932, Henry I conquered Lusatia and Milsko. In 1018, on the strength of peace in Bautzen, Lusatia became a part of Poland; but, it returned to German rule before 1031.
The region is the home of the ethnic group of Sorbs, a small West Slavic people.

West Slavs

West SlavicWestern SlavsSlavic
Sorbs (, Serby, Sorben, also known by their former autonyms Lusatians and Wends) are a West Slavic ethnic group predominantly inhabiting Lusatia, a region divided between Germany (the states of Saxony and Brandenburg) and Poland (the provinces of Lower Silesia and Lubusz).
West Slavic speaking nations today include the Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, Sorbs and ethnic groups Kashubians, Moravians and Silesians.

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
Sorbs (, Serby, Sorben, also known by their former autonyms Lusatians and Wends) are a West Slavic ethnic group predominantly inhabiting Lusatia, a region divided between Germany (the states of Saxony and Brandenburg) and Poland (the provinces of Lower Silesia and Lubusz). In 1018, on the strength of peace in Bautzen, Lusatia became a part of Poland; but, it returned to German rule before 1031.
Areas of what is today the eastern part of Germany were inhabited by Western Slavic tribes of Sorbs, Veleti and the Obotritic confederation.

Sorbian languages

SorbianSorbian languageWendish
Sorbs traditionally speak the Sorbian languages (also known as "Wendish" and "Lusatian"), closely related to the Polish, Kashubian, Czech and Slovak.
The Sorbian languages (, serbska rěc) are two closely related, but only partially mutually intelligible, West Slavic languages spoken by the Sorbs, a West Slavic minority in the Lusatia region of eastern Germany.

Sorbs (tribe)

SorbsSerbsSlav Sorb tribes
The ethnonym "Sorbs" (Serbja, Serby) derives from the medieval ethnic groups called Sorbs (Surbi, Sorabi).
The tribe is last mentioned in the late 10th century, but its descendants are an ethnic group of Sorbs.

Saxony

Free State of SaxonySaxonSachsen
Sorbs (, Serby, Sorben, also known by their former autonyms Lusatians and Wends) are a West Slavic ethnic group predominantly inhabiting Lusatia, a region divided between Germany (the states of Saxony and Brandenburg) and Poland (the provinces of Lower Silesia and Lubusz). The former Prime Minister of Saxony, Stanislaw Tillich, is of Sorbian origin.
Saxony is home to the Sorbs, Germany's only autochthonous minority.

Stanislaw Tillich

The former Prime Minister of Saxony, Stanislaw Tillich, is of Sorbian origin.
Tillich is of Sorbian ethnicity and lives in Panschwitz-Kuckau (Pančicy-Kukow), which is some 35 kilometres north-east of Dresden near Kamenz.

Dervan

White Serbia
Under the leadership of dux (duke) Dervan ("Dervanus dux gente Surbiorum que ex genere Sclavinorum"), they joined the Slavic tribal union of Samo, after Samo's decisive victory against Frankish King Dagobert I in 631.
Dervan or Derwan (Dervanus) was an early King of the Serbs (Sorbs) (fl. 615–636).

Brandenburg

State of BrandenburgBrandenburg, GermanyBB
Sorbs (, Serby, Sorben, also known by their former autonyms Lusatians and Wends) are a West Slavic ethnic group predominantly inhabiting Lusatia, a region divided between Germany (the states of Saxony and Brandenburg) and Poland (the provinces of Lower Silesia and Lubusz).
During the 12th century, the German kings and emperors re-established control over the mixed Slav-inhabited lands of present-day Brandenburg, although some Slavs like the Sorbs in Lusatia adapted to Germanization while retaining their distinctiveness.

White Serbia

White SerbsBoikiSerbs
According to 10th-century source De Administrando Imperio, they lived "since the beginning" in the region called by them as Boiki which was a neighbor to Franica, and when two brothers succeeded their father, one of them migrated with half of the people to the Balkans during the rule of Heraclius in the first-half of the 7th-century.
They are the ancestors of the modern Serbs and Sorbs.

Upper Lusatia

OberlausitzUpperMargraviate of Upper Lusatia
In 932, Henry I conquered Lusatia and Milsko. Upper Lusatia still belongs to Saxony and Lower Lusatia to Brandenburg.
Both Lusatias are home to the West Slavic minority group of the Sorbs.

Miliduch

The Annales Regni Francorum state that in 806 Sorbian Duke Miliduch fought against the Franks and was killed.
Miliduch (also Miliduh and Miłyduch, Милидух, Miliduoch; d. 806) was a knyaz of the Lusatian Serbs (Sorbs).

Milceni

Milzener MarchMilczanieMilzener
The two groups were separated from each other by a wide and uninhabited forest range, one around Upper Spree and the rest between the Elbe and Saale, including: Glomacze - Dolomici, Milceni, Chutizi, and Sitice.
Modern descendants of the Milceni are the Sorbs of the Free State of Saxony, Germany.

Czimislav

In 840, Sorbian Duke Czimislav was killed.
Czimislav was a 9th-century King of the Lusatian Serbs (Sorbs).

Bautzen

eponymous cityBudyšinBautzen/Budyšin
In 1018, on the strength of peace in Bautzen, Lusatia became a part of Poland; but, it returned to German rule before 1031.
Bautzen is often regarded as the unofficial, but historical capital of Upper Lusatia, and it is the most important cultural centre of the Sorbs, a Slavic people.

Duchy of Thuringia

ThuringiaLandgraviate of ThuringiaThuringian
Afterwards, these Slavic tribes continuously raided Thuringia.
In 849, the eastern part of Thuringia was organised as the limes Sorabicus, or Sorbian March, and placed under a duke named Thachulf.

Glomacze

DaleminziDolomiciGau Daleminzi
The two groups were separated from each other by a wide and uninhabited forest range, one around Upper Spree and the rest between the Elbe and Saale, including: Glomacze - Dolomici, Milceni, Chutizi, and Sitice.
About 850 the Bavarian Geographer located a Talaminzi (Dala-Daleminzi) settlement area east of the Sorbs.

Germanisation

GermanizationGermanizedGermanised
From the beginning of the 16th century the whole Sorbian-inhabited area, with the exception of Lusatia, underwent Germanization.
Early Germanisation went along with the Ostsiedlung during the Middle Ages in Hanoverian Wendland, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Lusatia, and other areas, formerly inhabited by Slavic tribes – Polabian Slavs such as Obotrites, Veleti and Sorbs.

Samo

King Samorealm of the SlavsSamo realm
Under the leadership of dux (duke) Dervan ("Dervanus dux gente Surbiorum que ex genere Sclavinorum"), they joined the Slavic tribal union of Samo, after Samo's decisive victory against Frankish King Dagobert I in 631.
The Sorbian prince Dervan abandoned the Franks and "placed himself and his people under Samo's realm".

Handrij Zejler

Throughout the Third Reich, Sorbians were described as a German tribe who spoke a Slavic language and their national poet Handrij Zejler was German.
Handrij Zejler (1 February 1804 – 15 October 1872; official German name Andreas Seiler) was a Sorbian writer, pastor and national activist.

Jan Skala

Entangled lives of the Sorbs during World War II are exemplified by life stories of Mina Witkojc, Měrčin Nowak-Njechorński and Jan Skala.
Jan Skala (17 June 1889 – 22 January 1945) was a Sorbian journalist, poet and leading ideologist of the Sorbian national movement.

Lower Lusatia

NiederlausitzLowerLusatian
Upper Lusatia still belongs to Saxony and Lower Lusatia to Brandenburg.
Like adjacent Upper Lusatia in the south, Lower Lusatia is a settlement area of the West Slavic Sorbs whose endangered Lower Sorbian language is related to Upper Sorbian and Polish.

Domowina

League of Lusatian Sorbs
The Sorbs were officially recognized as an ethnic minority, more than 100 Sorbian schools and several academic institutions were founded, the Domowina and its associated societies were re-established and a Sorbian theatre was created.
Domowina (Sorbian: "Home") is a political independent league of the Sorbian and Wendish people and umbrella organization of Sorbian societies in Lower and Upper Lusatia, Germany.

Lands of the Bohemian Crown

Bohemian CrownCrown of BohemiaBohemia
Between 1376 and 1635 Lusatia was part of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown, under the rule of the Luxembourgs, Habsburgs and other kings.

Jakub Bart-Ćišinski

In 1875, Jakub Bart-Ćišinski, the poet and classicist of Upper Sorbian literature, and Karol Arnošt Muka created a movement of young Sorbians influencing Lusatian art, science and literature for the following 50 years.
Jakub Bart-Ćišinski (20 August 1856 in Kuckau – 16 October 1909 in Panschwitz), also known as Łužičan, Jakub Bart Kukowski, was Sorbian poet, writer and playwright, translator of Czech, Polish, Italian and German literature.