Sound-on-disc

ChronophonephonoscènesVictor disc
Sound-on-disc is a class of sound film processes using a phonograph or other disc to record or play back sound in sync with a motion picture.wikipedia
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Sound film

talkietalkiessound
Sound-on-disc is a class of sound film processes using a phonograph or other disc to record or play back sound in sync with a motion picture.
Reliable synchronization was difficult to achieve with the early sound-on-disc systems, and amplification and recording quality were also inadequate.

Vitaphone

The Vitaphone CorporationThe Vitaphone Corp.Vitaphone Orchestra
Vitaphone was the last major analog sound-on-disc system and the only one which was widely used and commercially successful.

Photokinema

Phono-Kinema
Photo-Kinema (some sources say Phono-Kinema) was a sound-on-disc system for motion pictures invented by Orlando Kellum.

Chronophone

* The Chronophone (Léon Gaumont) "Filmparlants" and phonoscènes 1902–1910 (experimental), 1910–1917 (industrial) * Systems with the film projector linked to a phonograph or cylinder phonograph, developed by Thomas Edison (Kinetophone, Kinetophonograph), Selig Polyscope, French companies such as Gaumont (Chronomégaphone and Chronophone) and Pathé, and British systems.
This sound-on-disc display was used as an experiment from 1902 to 1910.

The Clue of the New Pin (1929 film)

The Clue of the New Pina film in 1929Clue of the New Pin
* British Phototone, short-lived UK system using 12-inch discs, introduced in 1928-29 (Clue of the New Pin)
The film was one of only 10 filmed in British Phototone, a sound-on-disc system which used 12-inch discs.

Dream Street (film)

Dream StreetDream Street'' (film)
The original 1921 version of Dream Street is notable for a brief sequence when Griffith steps out in front of a curtain at the beginning of the movie and talks to the audience about the film, using Photokinema, an early sound-on-disc process developed by Orlando Kellum.

Phonoscène

Phonoscènes
* The Chronophone (Léon Gaumont) "Filmparlants" and phonoscènes 1902–1910 (experimental), 1910–1917 (industrial)
The three major french Belle Époque celebrities, Félix Mayol, Dranem and Polin were recorded by Alice Guy-Blaché using the Chronophone Sound-on-disc system to make phonoscènes.

Sound-on-film

optical soundtracksoundoptical
Earlier technologies were sound-on-disc, meaning the film's soundtrack would be on a separate phonograph record.

Phonograph

turntablesgramophoneturntable
Sound-on-disc is a class of sound film processes using a phonograph or other disc to record or play back sound in sync with a motion picture. * Systems with the film projector linked to a phonograph or cylinder phonograph, developed by Thomas Edison (Kinetophone, Kinetophonograph), Selig Polyscope, French companies such as Gaumont (Chronomégaphone and Chronophone) and Pathé, and British systems.

Sound

audiosound wavesound waves
Sound-on-disc is a class of sound film processes using a phonograph or other disc to record or play back sound in sync with a motion picture.

Film

motion picturemoviefilms
Sound-on-disc is a class of sound film processes using a phonograph or other disc to record or play back sound in sync with a motion picture.

Interlock (engineering)

interlockinterlocksinterlocked
Early sound-on-disc systems used a mechanical interlock with the movie projector, while more recent systems use timecode.

Movie projector

projectorfilm projectorprojectors
Early sound-on-disc systems used a mechanical interlock with the movie projector, while more recent systems use timecode.

Timecode

time codetime codedtimestamp
Early sound-on-disc systems used a mechanical interlock with the movie projector, while more recent systems use timecode.

Léon Gaumont

GaumontLeon GaumontChronochrome
* The Chronophone (Léon Gaumont) "Filmparlants" and phonoscènes 1902–1910 (experimental), 1910–1917 (industrial)

Phonograph cylinder

wax cylinderwax cylinderscylinder
* Systems with the film projector linked to a phonograph or cylinder phonograph, developed by Thomas Edison (Kinetophone, Kinetophonograph), Selig Polyscope, French companies such as Gaumont (Chronomégaphone and Chronophone) and Pathé, and British systems.

Thomas Edison

Thomas Alva EdisonEdisonThomas A. Edison
* Systems with the film projector linked to a phonograph or cylinder phonograph, developed by Thomas Edison (Kinetophone, Kinetophonograph), Selig Polyscope, French companies such as Gaumont (Chronomégaphone and Chronophone) and Pathé, and British systems.

Kinetoscope

KinetographKinetophonepeephole viewing of motion picture devices
* Systems with the film projector linked to a phonograph or cylinder phonograph, developed by Thomas Edison (Kinetophone, Kinetophonograph), Selig Polyscope, French companies such as Gaumont (Chronomégaphone and Chronophone) and Pathé, and British systems.

The Dickson Experimental Sound Film

KinetophonographDickson Experimental Sound FilmKinetophone (Dickson)
* Systems with the film projector linked to a phonograph or cylinder phonograph, developed by Thomas Edison (Kinetophone, Kinetophonograph), Selig Polyscope, French companies such as Gaumont (Chronomégaphone and Chronophone) and Pathé, and British systems.

Gaumont Film Company

GaumontSociété des Etablissements L. GaumontGaumont Distribution
* Systems with the film projector linked to a phonograph or cylinder phonograph, developed by Thomas Edison (Kinetophone, Kinetophonograph), Selig Polyscope, French companies such as Gaumont (Chronomégaphone and Chronophone) and Pathé, and British systems.

Compressed air gramophone

ChronomegaphoneAuxetophoneChronomégaphone
* Systems with the film projector linked to a phonograph or cylinder phonograph, developed by Thomas Edison (Kinetophone, Kinetophonograph), Selig Polyscope, French companies such as Gaumont (Chronomégaphone and Chronophone) and Pathé, and British systems.

Pathé

Pathé ExchangePathé FrèresPathé Distribution
* Systems with the film projector linked to a phonograph or cylinder phonograph, developed by Thomas Edison (Kinetophone, Kinetophonograph), Selig Polyscope, French companies such as Gaumont (Chronomégaphone and Chronophone) and Pathé, and British systems.