South Armagh Sniper (1990–1997)

South Armagh SnipersniperSouth Armagh Sniper (1990–97)South Armagh sniper squadsSouth Armagh Sniperstwo sniper teamsan IRA sniper teamone of the South Armagh Sniper unitssniper activitysniper in South Armagh
The South Armagh Sniper is the generic name given to the members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (IRA) South Armagh Brigade who conducted a sniping campaign against British security forces from 1990 to 1997.wikipedia
114 Related Articles

Provisional Irish Republican Army

Provisional IRAIRAPIRA
The South Armagh Sniper is the generic name given to the members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (IRA) South Armagh Brigade who conducted a sniping campaign against British security forces from 1990 to 1997. One of the first leaders of the Provisional IRA, Seán Mac Stíofáin, supported the use of snipers in his book Memoirs of a Revolutionary, attracted by the motto "one shot, one kill".
By the early 1990s, the bulk of the IRA activity was carried out by the South Armagh Brigade, well known through its sniping operations and attacks on British Army helicopters.

Provisional Irish Republican Army arms importation

Provisional IRA arms importationalleged gun runningarms smuggling
During the 1980s, the IRA relied mostly on weaponry smuggled from Libya.
These weapons were used by two South Armagh sniper teams to conduct a sniping campaign against British Army patrols operating in the area.

Barrett M82

Barrett M82A1Barrett M107M107
The campaign is notable for the snipers' use of .50 BMG calibre Barrett M82 and M90 long-range rifles in some of the shootings.

Barrett M90

M90
The campaign is notable for the snipers' use of .50 BMG calibre Barrett M82 and M90 long-range rifles in some of the shootings.

1996 Docklands bombing

Docklands bombingCanary Wharf bombCanary Wharf bombing
When the IRA ended the ceasefire with the bombing of the London Docklands in February 1996, some republicans had already abandoned the organisation, while others had turned to criminal activities.
He had been a member of an IRA sniper team in South Armagh.

The Troubles

TroublesNorthern Ireland conflictNorthern Ireland
An RUC constable almost lost one of his legs in the last sniper attack during the Troubles.
They developed two sniper teams to attack British Army and RUC patrols.

Rosemary Nelson

Rosemary Nelson InquiryThe Rosemary Nelson Inquiry
He was defended by solicitor Rosemary Nelson, later killed by the loyalist organisation Red Hand Defenders.
Nelson represented clients in a number of high-profile cases (including Michael Caraher, one of the South Armagh Snipers, as well as a republican paramilitary accused of killing two RUC officers.

Rupert Thorneloe

Rupert Thorneloe MBE
One of the key players in the British campaign against the South Armagh sniper was Welsh Guards' Captain Rupert Thorneloe, according to journalist Toby Harnden.
According to journalist Toby Harnden, Thorneloe played a key role in the British campaign against the IRA's South Armagh sniper and the arrest of four members of one of the sniper teams.

Bernard Henry McGinn

Bernard McGinn
After a brief fist fight, James McArdle, Michael Caraher, Bernard McGinn and Martin Mines were seized at a farm near Freeduff and handed over to the RUC.
He was a member of one of two sniper teams which killed nine members of the security forces between 1992 and 1997, including Lance Bombardier Stephen Restorick, who was killed by a single shot from a Barrett M90 sniper rifle on 12 February 1997, and was the last British Army soldier to be killed during The Troubles.

Fergal Caraher

Fergal
One of the IRA volunteers captured, Michael Caraher, was the brother of Fergal Caraher, a Sinn Féin member and IRA volunteer killed by Royal Marines at a checkpoint on 30 December 1990 near Cullyhanna.
His brother, Michael Caraher, who was severely wounded in the shooting, later became the shooter of one of the South Armagh sniper squads, which killed seven British soldiers and two Royal Ulster Constabulary members.

Sniper

sniperssnipingsniper team
The South Armagh Sniper is the generic name given to the members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (IRA) South Armagh Brigade who conducted a sniping campaign against British security forces from 1990 to 1997.
There were some instances in the early 1990s of British soldiers and RUC personnel being shot with .50 caliber Barrett rifles by sniper teams collectively known as the South Armagh sniper.

Occupation of Cullaville

Occupation of Cullaville (1993)took control of the village of Cullaville
Another Barrett is reported to have been in possession of the IRA team in the Occupation of Cullaville in South Armagh in April 1993.

Provisional IRA South Armagh Brigade

South Armagh BrigadeSouth ArmaghIRA's South Armagh Brigade
The South Armagh Sniper is the generic name given to the members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (IRA) South Armagh Brigade who conducted a sniping campaign against British security forces from 1990 to 1997.
His brother Michael Caraher, who was severely wounded in the shooting, later became the commander of one of the South Armagh sniper squads.

Generic

Generic (disambiguation)generic term
The South Armagh Sniper is the generic name given to the members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (IRA) South Armagh Brigade who conducted a sniping campaign against British security forces from 1990 to 1997.

British Armed Forces

British militaryForcesarmed forces
The South Armagh Sniper is the generic name given to the members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (IRA) South Armagh Brigade who conducted a sniping campaign against British security forces from 1990 to 1997.

.50 BMG

.50 caliber12.7×99mm NATO.50 cal
The campaign is notable for the snipers' use of .50 BMG calibre Barrett M82 and M90 long-range rifles in some of the shootings.

Seán Mac Stíofáin

Sean MacStiofainSeán Mac StiofáinSeán MacStiofáin
One of the first leaders of the Provisional IRA, Seán Mac Stíofáin, supported the use of snipers in his book Memoirs of a Revolutionary, attracted by the motto "one shot, one kill".

Royal Ulster Constabulary

RUCpoliceR.U.C.
About 180 British soldiers, Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers and Her Majesty's Prison Service prison staff members were killed in this way from 1971 to 1991.

Her Majesty's Prison Service

HM Prison ServicePrison ServiceHM Prison
About 180 British soldiers, Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers and Her Majesty's Prison Service prison staff members were killed in this way from 1971 to 1991.

ArmaLite AR-18

AR-18AR-180Armalite
The AR-18 Armalite rifle became the weapon of choice for IRA members at this time.

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
The British Army assessment of the conflict asserted that the IRA sniping skills often did not match those expected from a well-trained sniper.

Libya

State of LibyaLibyanLBY
During the 1980s, the IRA relied mostly on weaponry smuggled from Libya.

George Harrison (Irish republican)

George HarrisonHarrison Network
The regular shipments from the United States, once the main source of arms for the republicans through the gunrunning operations of George Harrison, were disrupted after he was arrested by the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1981.