South Carolina

Top left, the shores of Florida and the future Carolina explored in 1500 and showed in 1502 on the Cantino planisphere
Map of French Florida, which included modern-day South Carolina
The Carolina Colony grants of 1663 and 1665
Millford Plantation (1839–41), an example of Greek Revival architecture
Charleston in ruins, 1865
Some children who worked in South Carolina textile mills went to school half a day and worked before and after school—and eight or nine hours on Saturday
A map of the average annual precipitation in South Carolina
Category 4 Hurricane Hugo in 1989
Congaree National Park, Hopkins
Population density of South Carolina
The Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge from Charleston Harbor
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Furman University bell tower near Greenville
South Carolina State House
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election

State in the coastal Southeastern region of the United States.

- South Carolina

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Province of South Carolina

Province of Great Britain that existed in North America from 1712 to 1776.

Province of Great Britain that existed in North America from 1712 to 1776.

An orthographic projection of the world, highlighting South Carolina (green).
The Province of Carolina before and after the split into north and south
An orthographic projection of the world, highlighting South Carolina (green).

"Carolina" is taken from the Latin word for "Charles" (Carolus), honoring King Charles II, and was first named in the 1663 Royal Charter granting to Edward, Earl of Clarendon; George, Duke of Albemarle; William, Lord Craven; John, Lord Berkeley; Anthony, Lord Ashley; Sir George Carteret, Sir William Berkeley, and Sir John Colleton the right to settle lands in the present-day U.S. states of North Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida.

A scenic vista from an observation area at Hunting Island State Park near Beaufort. Such salt marshes are emblematic of the Lowcountry and its landscapes, but are also vulnerable to climate change caused sea level rise and development of tourism and housing.

South Carolina Lowcountry

A scenic vista from an observation area at Hunting Island State Park near Beaufort. Such salt marshes are emblematic of the Lowcountry and its landscapes, but are also vulnerable to climate change caused sea level rise and development of tourism and housing.
Definitions of the "Lowcountry" area always include the counties in dark red, less often those in lighter shades.

The Lowcountry (sometimes Low Country or just low country) is a geographic and cultural region along South Carolina's coast, including the Sea Islands.

The Blue Ridge Mountains as seen from Blowing Rock, North Carolina.

Blue Ridge Mountains

The Blue Ridge Mountains are a physiographic province of the larger Appalachian Mountains range.

The Blue Ridge Mountains are a physiographic province of the larger Appalachian Mountains range.

The Blue Ridge Mountains as seen from Blowing Rock, North Carolina.
The Blue Ridge near Massies Mill, Nelson County, Virginia.
Blue Ridge Mountains, viewed from Chimney Rock Mountain Overlook in North Carolina
The northernmost extension of the Blue Ridge Mountains, in northern Maryland
The Blue Ridge Mountains in the background from Lynchburg, Virginia
View of Blue Ridge Mountains from Grandfather Mountain in NC

The mountain range is located in the eastern United States, and extends 550 miles southwest from southern Pennsylvania through Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia.

Clockwise from top: Battle of Gettysburg

Union Captain John Tidball's artillery

Confederate prisoners

ironclad USS Atlanta (1861)

Ruins of Richmond, Virginia

Battle of Franklin

American Civil War

Civil war in the United States between the Union (states that remained loyal to the federal union, or "the North") and the Confederacy (states that voted to secede, or "the South").

Civil war in the United States between the Union (states that remained loyal to the federal union, or "the North") and the Confederacy (states that voted to secede, or "the South").

Clockwise from top: Battle of Gettysburg

Union Captain John Tidball's artillery

Confederate prisoners

ironclad USS Atlanta (1861)

Ruins of Richmond, Virginia

Battle of Franklin
Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe, aroused public opinion about the evils of slavery. According to legend, when Lincoln was introduced to her at the White House, his first words were, "So this is the little lady who started this Great War."
Frederick Douglass, a former slave, was a leading abolitionist
Marais des Cygnes massacre of anti-slavery Kansans, May 19, 1858
Mathew Brady, Portrait of Abraham Lincoln, 1860
The first published imprint of secession, a broadside issued by the Charleston Mercury, December 20, 1860
Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America (1861–1865)
Bombardment of the Fort by the Confederates
Rioters attacking a building during the New York anti-draft riots of 1863
Clashes on the rivers were melees of ironclads, cottonclads, gunboats and rams, complicated by naval mines and fire rafts.
Battle between the USS Monitor and USS Merrimack (1855)
General Scott's "Anaconda Plan" 1861. Tightening naval blockade, forcing rebels out of Missouri along the Mississippi River, Kentucky Unionists sit on the fence, idled cotton industry illustrated in Georgia.
Gunline of nine Union ironclads. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron off Charleston. Continuous blockade of all major ports was sustained by North's overwhelming war production.
A December 1861 cartoon in Punch magazine in London ridicules American aggressiveness in the Trent Affair. John Bull, at right, warns Uncle Sam, "You do what's right, my son, or I'll blow you out of the water."
County map of Civil War battles by theater and year
Robert E. Lee
"Stonewall" Jackson got his nickname at Bull Run.
George B. McClellan
The Battle of Antietam, the Civil War's deadliest one-day fight.
Confederate dead overrun at Marye's Heights, reoccupied next day May 4, 1863
Pickett's Charge
Ulysses S. Grant
Albert Sidney Johnston died at Shiloh
By 1863, the Union controlled large portions of the Western Theater, especially areas surrounding the Mississippi River
The Battle of Chickamauga, the highest two-day losses
Nathaniel Lyon secured St. Louis docks and arsenal, led Union forces to expel Missouri Confederate forces and government.
New Orleans captured
William Tecumseh Sherman
These dead soldiers—from Ewell's May 1864 attack at Spotsylvania—delayed Grant's advance on Richmond in the Overland Campaign.
Philip Sheridan
Map of Confederate territory losses year by year
Burying Union dead on the Antietam battlefield, 1862
Through the supervision of the Freedmen's Bureau, northern teachers traveled into the South to provide education and training for the newly freed population.
Beginning in 1961 the U.S. Post Office released commemorative stamps for five famous battles, each issued on the 100th anniversary of the respective battle.
The Battle of Fort Sumter, as depicted by Currier and Ives.

Fighting broke out in April 1861 when the Confederate army began the Battle of Fort Sumter in South Carolina, just over a month after the first inauguration of Abraham Lincoln.

Cherokee

The Cherokee ( ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯᎢ, or ᏣᎳᎩ) are one of the indigenous peoples of the Southeastern Woodlands of the United States.

The Cherokee ( ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯᎢ, or ᏣᎳᎩ) are one of the indigenous peoples of the Southeastern Woodlands of the United States.

Great Smoky Mountains
An annotated copy of a hand-painted Catawba deerskin map of the tribes between Charleston (left) and Virginia (right) following the displacements of a century of disease and enslavement and the 1715–7 Yamasee War. The Cherokee are labelled as "Cherrikies".
After the Anglo-Cherokee War, bitterness remained between the two groups. In 1765, Henry Timberlake took three Cherokee chiefs to London meet the Crown and help strengthen the newly declared peace.
Portrait of Major Ridge in 1834, from History of the Indian Tribes of North America.
Cherokee National Council building, New Echota
Tah-Chee (Dutch), A Cherokee Chief, 1837
Chief John Ross, c. 1840
Cherokee beadwork sampler, made at Dwight Mission, Indian Territory, 19th century, collection of the Oklahoma History Center
Cól-lee, a Band Chief, painted by George Catlin, 1834
Cherokee confederates reunion in New Orleans, 1902.
William Penn (Cherokee), His Shield (Yanktonai), Levi Big Eagle (Yanktonai), Bear Ghost (Yanktonai) and Black Moustache (Sisseton).
Map of present-day Cherokee Nation Tribal Jurisdiction Area (red)
Sequoyah, the inventor of the Cherokee syllabary
Flag of the Cherokee Nation
Cherokee Nation Historic Courthouse in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.
The Cherokee Female Seminary was built in 1889 by the Cherokee in Indian Territory.
Flag of the Eastern Band Cherokee
Flag of the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians
The Mount Tabor Indian Community flag of primarily Cherokee as well as Choctaw, Chickasaw and Muscogee-Creek people located in Rusk County, Texas.

Prior to the 18th century, they were concentrated in their homelands, in towns along river valleys of what is now southwestern North Carolina, southeastern Tennessee, edges of western South Carolina, northern Georgia and northeastern Alabama.

Pre-contact distribution of the Catawba

Catawba people

Pre-contact distribution of the Catawba
A c. 1724 annotated copy of a deerskin Catawba map of the tribes between Charleston (left) and Virginia (right) following the displacements of a century of disease and enslavement and the 1715–7 Yamasee War. The Catawba are labelled as "Nasaw".
Catawba at The Corn Exposition 1913, Rock Hill, South Carolina
The Catawba women are well known in the Carolinas for their pottery.
A Catawba family in 1908 South Carolina.

The Catawba, also known as Issa, Essa or Iswä but most commonly Iswa (Catawba: Ye Iswąˀ – "people of the river"), are a federally recognized tribe of Native Americans, known as the Catawba Indian Nation. Their current lands are in South Carolina, on the Catawba River, near the city of Rock Hill.

Catawba River

Map of the Catawba River in South Carolina
On the Catawba River

The Catawba River originates in Western North Carolina and flows into South Carolina, where it later becomes known as the Wateree River.

Map of the Sea islands

Sea Islands

The Sea Islands are a chain of tidal and barrier islands on the Atlantic Ocean coast of the Southeastern United States.

The Sea Islands are a chain of tidal and barrier islands on the Atlantic Ocean coast of the Southeastern United States.

Map of the Sea islands

Numbering over 100, they are located between the mouths of the Santee and St. Johns Rivers along the coast of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.

Georgetown, South Carolina

Georgetown products treemap, 2020
The Harborwalk in Georgetown
A glimpse of downtown Georgetown, looking north from Francis Marion Park
Looking at Georgetown from the point in East Bay Park
Most of the older neighborhoods were planted with allées of Southern live oaks, such as these on East Bay Street.
Winyah Indigo Society Hall, Georgetown
Crowley Store, Georgetown
J.R. Smith House at 722 Prince Street. Also known as the Mark Moses house, it served briefly as a Jewish school.
Arcadia Plantation, circa 1893, Georgetown vicinity, Georgetown County
John S. Pyatt House, Georgetown

Georgetown is the third oldest town in the U.S. state of South Carolina and the county seat of Georgetown County, in the Lowcountry.

Savannah River

Talmadge Memorial Bridge over the Savannah River in Savannah
A cargo ship navigates the narrow Savannah River channel at Savannah
Ocean Steamship Company (Savannah Line), piers 34 and 35, at the foot of Spring and Canal Streets, 1893

The Savannah River is a major river in the southeastern United States, forming most of the border between the states of South Carolina and Georgia.