South Eastern Railway (England)

South Eastern RailwaySouth Eastern Railway (UK)South Eastern Railway CompanySouth EasternSERReading, Guildford and Reigate RailwaySouth Eastern Railway (SER)South Eastern Railway, UKSouth Eastern RailwaysSouth-Eastern Railway Company
The South Eastern Railway (SER) was a railway company in south-eastern England from 1836 until 1922.wikipedia
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South Eastern and Chatham Railway

SECRSouth Eastern & Chatham RailwaySE&CR
However, in 1899 the SER agreed with the LCDR to share operation of the two railways, work them as a single system (marketed as the South Eastern and Chatham Railway) and pool receipts: but it was not a full amalgamation.
The South Eastern and Chatham Railway Companies Joint Management Committee (SE&CRCJMC), known as the South Eastern and Chatham Railway (SE&CR), was a working union of two neighbouring rival railways, the South Eastern Railway (SER) and London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LC&DR), which operated between London and south-east England.

London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
The company was formed to construct a route from London to Dover.
It existed until 1853, when the Hanseatic cities of Lübeck, Bremen and Hamburg sold the property to South Eastern Railway.

Southern Railway (UK)

Southern RailwaySRSouthern
The SER and LCDR remained separate companies until becoming constituents of the Southern Railway on 1 January 1923.
Four important railway companies operated along the south coast of England prior to 1923 – the London & South Western Railway (LSWR), the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSCR), and the South Eastern Railway and the London Chatham and Dover Railway.

Reading, Berkshire

ReadingReading, EnglandReading, United Kingdom
Most of the company's routes were in Kent, eastern Sussex and the London suburbs, with a long cross-country route from in Surrey to Reading, Berkshire.
The Great Western Railway arrived in 1841, followed by the South Eastern Railway in 1849 and the London and South Western Railway in 1856.

London Bridge station

London BridgeLondon Bridge railway stationJubilee line station
It also meant that its trains from London Bridge passed over the lines of three other companies: the L&GR to Corbett's Lane Junction, the L&CR as far as 'Jolly Sailor', and the L&BR to Merstham.
It subsequently served the London and Croydon Railway, the London and Brighton Railway and the South Eastern Railway, thus becoming an important London terminus.

William Cubitt

Sir William CubittWilliam Cubitt & Co.blown up with gunpowder
The engineer of the new line, William Cubitt, was also engineer of the London and Croydon Railway (L&CR), which planned to use L&GR lines as far as Corbett’s Lane in Bermondsey before turning south towards Croydon.
He worked on canals, docks, and railways, including the South Eastern Railway and the Great Northern Railway.

Norwood Junction railway station

Norwood JunctionNorwoodNorwood Junction station
A new connection on this line near to Norwood could provide access to a southerly route to Dover via Tonbridge, Ashford and Folkestone. During Parliamentary discussions on the proposed route of the London and Brighton Railway (L&BR) during 1837, pressure was put on the SER to divert its proposed route so it could also share the L&BR mainline between Jolly Sailor (Norwood) and Earlswood Common, and then travel eastwards to Tonbridge.
From 1841 the lines through Norwood were used by the London and Brighton Railway and from 1842 the South Eastern Railway, but neither of these companies used the station.

Canterbury

Canterbury, KentCanterbury, EnglandCantebury
Branch lines were later opened to Tunbridge Wells, Hastings, Canterbury and other places in Kent.
The Canterbury & Whitstable Railway, the world's first passenger railway, was opened in 1830; bankrupt by 1844, it was purchased by the South Eastern Railway, which connected the town to its larger network in 1846.

Bricklayers Arms railway station

Bricklayers ArmsBricklayers' ArmsBricklayers Arms depot
Parliament had relaxed restrictions on new railways into London and so SER sought authority to construct a branch from Corbett's Lane to a new temporary passenger terminus and goods station at Bricklayers Arms railway station, for use by both railways, removing the need to use the Greenwich Railway.
Bricklayers Arms was a railway station in Southwark opened by the London and Croydon Railway and the South Eastern Railway in 1844 as an alternative to the London and Greenwich Railway's terminus at London Bridge.

Folkestone

Folkestone, KentFolkstoneFolkestone, England
A new connection on this line near to Norwood could provide access to a southerly route to Dover via Tonbridge, Ashford and Folkestone. The main line reached Ashford on 1 December 1842; the outskirts of Folkestone by 28 June 1843; and Dover by 7 February 1844.
It was bought by the South Eastern Railway Company (SER), which was then building the London to Dover railway line.

London and Croydon Railway

London & Croydon RailwayCroydon Railway London and Croydon
The engineer of the new line, William Cubitt, was also engineer of the London and Croydon Railway (L&CR), which planned to use L&GR lines as far as Corbett’s Lane in Bermondsey before turning south towards Croydon.
The South Eastern Railway got its authorising Act of Parliament on 21 June 1836 for a line from Dover, joining the London and Croydon line end-on at Croydon, and the London and Brighton Railway obtained its Act on 15 June 1837, also relying on running over the London and Croydon from Norwood.

Brighton main line

Brighton lineQuarry Linemain line
Later that year, the SER refunded to the L&BR £430,000 and took ownership of the southern half of the Croydon-Redhill line.
A condition required by Parliament was that the railway should share its line between Croydon and Redhill with the South Eastern Railway main line to Dover.

Medway Valley line

Medway Valleybranch lineMaidstone to Gillingham railway line
The first branch built by the SER was the Medway Valley Line on 24 September 1844, from Paddock Wood to Maidstone.
The line was built in two stages by the South Eastern Railway (SER).

Hastings line

Bo-Peep junctionBopeep Junctionrailway line
A secondary main line from Tonbridge to the outskirts of Tunbridge Wells opened 20 September 1845.
The railway was constructed by the South Eastern Railway in the early 1850s across the difficult terrain of the High Weald.

List of railway stations in Dover

DoverDover MarineDover Western Docks
The SER opened Dover (later Dover Town) station on 7 February 1844.
Dover, Kent has had numerous railway stations due to the legacy of competition between the South Eastern Railway (SER) and London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LCDR) and the subsequent rationalisation attempts by their successors; South Eastern and Chatham Railway (SECR), Southern Railway and British Rail Southern Region.

Dover

Dover, EnglandDover, KentPort of Dover
The company was formed to construct a route from London to Dover. The main line reached Ashford on 1 December 1842; the outskirts of Folkestone by 28 June 1843; and Dover by 7 February 1844.
The railway reached Dover from two directions: the South Eastern Railway's main line connected with Folkestone in 1844, and the London, Chatham and Dover Railway opened its line from Canterbury in 1861.

Redhill–Tonbridge line

Redhill to Tonbridge Lineits lineMaidstone West & Three Bridges
The L&BR line to Redhill opened on 12 July 1841 and the SER line from Redhill to Tonbridge on 26 May 1842, when SER train services began.
It was originally part of the South Eastern Railway having been sanctioned by Act of Parliament in 1836 as part of the first rail route from London to Dover.

Folkestone East railway station

FolkestoneFolkestone JunctionFolkestone Junction railway station
In December 1848 it opened a steeply graded branch from the Folkestone station to the harbour.
Opened by the South Eastern Railway in 1843 as part of its main line from London, it was Folkestone's first station and handled substantial boat train traffic travelling to the Continent via Folkestone Harbour.

North Kent Line

North KentGreenhithe TunnelKent
Further eastward extension was not possible due to opposition from the Greenwich Hospital, but it was eventually opened in 1878 when the line joined the North Kent Line at Charlton.
The North Kent Line was the means by which the South Eastern Railway (SER) was able to connect its system to London at London Bridge.

London and Brighton Railway

London & Brighton RailwayLondon and Brighton Railway Company London and Brighton Railways
During Parliamentary discussions on the proposed route of the London and Brighton Railway (L&BR) during 1837, pressure was put on the SER to divert its proposed route so it could also share the L&BR mainline between Jolly Sailor (Norwood) and Earlswood Common, and then travel eastwards to Tonbridge.
However, members of the Committee insisted that a stretch of the new route between Croydon and Redhill should be shared with the South Eastern Railway as part of its projected route to Dover, which had not been part of Rennie's plan.

Marshlink line

Ashford to Hastings lineMarshlinkMarshlink railway line
By this time Hastings had already been reached by the SER in a roundabout route from Ashford, which opened 13 February 1851.
The line was constructed by the South Eastern Railway (SER) in the late 1840s, and it was considered politically important to build.

Ashford International railway station

Ashford InternationalAshfordAshford International station
By this time Hastings had already been reached by the SER in a roundabout route from Ashford, which opened 13 February 1851. The main line reached Ashford on 1 December 1842; the outskirts of Folkestone by 28 June 1843; and Dover by 7 February 1844.
The station opened in 1842 as Ashford by the South Eastern Railway (SER) as a temporary terminus of the line from London to Dover via Croydon.

Reading Southern railway station

ReadingReading S.R.Reading Southern station
In 1846 the SER supported the formation of the Reading, Guildford and Reigate Railway, a scheme to build a line connecting the London to Brighton main line at Redhill with the Great Western Railway (GWR) main line at Reading, and agreed to operate its services.
Reading Southern railway station was opened as the western terminus of the South Eastern Railway's route from, a junction station at the time of opening known as Reigate Junction in south-east Surrey, having direct links thence to Dover port, Brighton (a resort and fellow industrious town) and London Bridge.

Royal Tunbridge Wells

Tunbridge WellsTonbridge WellsTunbridge Wells, Kent
Branch lines were later opened to Tunbridge Wells, Hastings, Canterbury and other places in Kent. A secondary main line from Tonbridge to the outskirts of Tunbridge Wells opened 20 September 1845.
In 1842 an omnibus service was set up that ran from Tonbridge to Tunbridge Wells, enabling visitors to arrive from London within two hours, and in 1845 the town was linked to the railway network via a branch from South Eastern Railway's London-Hastings Hastings Line at Tonbridge.

Hastings

Hastings, East SussexHastings Borough CouncilHastings, England
Branch lines were later opened to Tunbridge Wells, Hastings, Canterbury and other places in Kent.
Of the London lines, the shorter is the Hastings Line, the former South Eastern Railway (SER) route to Charing Cross via Battle and Tunbridge Wells, which opened in 1852; and the longer is the East Coastway Line, the former London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSCR) route to Victoria via Bexhill, Eastbourne and Lewes.