South Korean defectors

Many, but not all, South Korean defectors cross the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) that separates the countries.

South Korean defectors are South Korean citizens who have defected to North Korea.

- South Korean defectors

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Korean Demilitarized Zone

Strip of land running across the Korean Peninsula near the 38th parallel north.

View of the North from the southern side of the Joint Security Area
The Korean DMZ denoted by the red highlighted area. The blue line indicates the international border. The four incursion tunnels are also shown.
The Korean Demilitarized Zone is visible at night from space due to a noticeable lack of lighting in the northern half of the Korean Peninsula
Detail of the DMZ
A portion of the North Korean DMZ seen from the Joint Security Area in January 1976
Conference Row seen from the northern side of the JSA
Kijŏng-dong in North Korea, seen from South Korea
Entrance to the North Korean-dug 4th Infiltration Tunnel, Korean DMZ
The Korean wall, or anti-tank barrier, in the demilitarized zone seen through binoculars from the North Korean side.
DMZ, North Korea. Electric fences are used in the Korean Demilitarized Zone as a means to seal off North Korea from South Korea. Behind the fence, there is a strip which has land mines hidden beneath it.
The Donghae Bukbu Line on Korea's east coast. The road and rail link was built for South Koreans visiting the Mount Kumgang Tourist Region in the North.
DMZ Train tour organized by Korail
Goesong lookout point
Map of the Korean DMZ

One of the leaflets found on the DMZ included a map of Cho Dae-hum's route of defection to North Korea across the DMZ.

Ryu Mi-yong

The chairwoman of the North Korean Chondoist Chongu Party.

She was known as a defector from South Korea to the North.

Choe Deok-sin

Minister for Agriculture of Malaya Khir Johari and the foreign minister of South Korea Choe Dok-sin sign the first ever trade agreement between those two countries in Seoul, 1962-11-05.

Choe Deok-sin (September 17, 1914 – November 14, 1989) was a South Korean Foreign Minister who later defected with his wife, Ryu Mi-yong, to North Korea.

Ri Sung-gi

North Korean chemist.

Following the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, he defected to the North.

Oh Kil-nam

Oh Kil-nam (born 1942) is a retired South Korean economist, who was offered a job as an economist in North Korea, and so defected to North Korea with his wife Shin Suk-ja

Jean-Baptiste Kim

Political defector-refugee from South Korea in Europe.

Jean-Baptiste Kim (right)

This led to his political defection from South Korea to North Korea, becoming an associate of Kim Jong-il whom he met and says was like a father figure for him.

Balloon propaganda campaigns in Korea

Balloon propaganda campaigns in Korea include both North and South Korean propaganda leaflet campaigns through the use of balloons as a distribution method since the Korean War.

South Korean activists releasing balloons
A South Korean sentry post seen from North Korea in the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ)
A United Nations force leaflet from the Korean War: Kim Il-sung manipulated by Mao and Stalin.
Imjingak's grounds are a frequent spot for the activists' rallies.
Some activists claim they can reach Pyongyang (pictured) with their balloons.

One of the leaflets found on the DMZ included a map of Cho Dae-hum's route of defection to North Korea across the DMZ.

1989 in South Korea

Events from the year 1989 in South Korea.

November 14 - Choe Deok-sin, foreign minister and defector (b. 1914)

Pyo Mu-won

Military officer and politician of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Many, but not all, South Korean defectors cross the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) that separates the countries.

He was an officer of Armed Forces of the Republic of Korea who defected to the North Korean side and joined the Korean People's Army.