South West Africa

South-West AfricaSouthwest AfricaoccupationSouth African ruleNamibiaSouth African administrationSouth African occupation of NamibiaSWABritish South West Africacolonial authorities
South West Africa (Suidwes-Afrika; Südwestafrika; Zuidwest-Afrika) was the name for modern-day Namibia when it was under South African administration, from 1915 to 1990.wikipedia
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German South West Africa

German South-West AfricaGerman Southwest AfricaSouth-West Africa
Previously the colony of German South West Africa from 1884-1915, it was made a League of Nations mandate of the British-ruled Union of South Africa following Germany’s losses in World War I.
After the war its administration was taken over by the Union of South Africa (part of the British Empire) and the territory was administered as South West Africa under a League of Nations mandate.

Namibia

NamibianRepublic of NamibiaSouth West Africa
South West Africa (Suidwes-Afrika; Südwestafrika; Zuidwest-Afrika) was the name for modern-day Namibia when it was under South African administration, from 1915 to 1990.
From 1948, with the National Party elected to power, South Africa applied apartheid also to what was then known as South West Africa.

League of Nations mandate

mandatemandatesmandate territory
Previously the colony of German South West Africa from 1884-1915, it was made a League of Nations mandate of the British-ruled Union of South Africa following Germany’s losses in World War I.
Most of the remaining mandates of the League of Nations (with the exception of South-West Africa) thus eventually became United Nations Trust Territories.

Union of South Africa

South AfricaUnionSouth African
Previously the colony of German South West Africa from 1884-1915, it was made a League of Nations mandate of the British-ruled Union of South Africa following Germany’s losses in World War I.
It was conferred the administration of South West Africa (now known as Namibia) as a League of Nations mandate.

Transitional Government of National Unity (Namibia)

Transitional Government of National UnityChairman of the Transitional Government of National Unity of South West Africachairman
During an interim period between 1978 and 1985, South Africa gradually granted South West Africa a limited form of home rule, culminating in the formation of a Transitional Government of National Unity.
The Transitional Government of National Unity (TGNU), also commonly called the Interim Government, was the interim government of South-West Africa (Namibia) from June 1985 to February 1989.

Walvis Bay

WalvisbaaiWalfish BayWalvisbay
In 1990, South West Africa was granted independence as the Republic of Namibia with the exception of Walvis Bay and the Penguin Islands, which continued to remain under South African rule until 1994. In 1977, South Africa transferred control of Walvis Bay back to the Cape Province, thereby making it an exclave.
South Africa was later awarded control (a Class "C" mandate) over South West Africa by the League of Nations to administer the territory.

Apartheid

South Africa under apartheidapartheid in South Africaapartheid South Africa
An additional consequence of this was the extension of apartheid laws to the territory.
Apartheid (South African English: ;, segregation; lit. "separateness") was a system of institutionalised racial segregation that existed in South Africa and South West Africa (Namibia) from 1948 until the early 1990s.

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
Previously the colony of German South West Africa from 1884-1915, it was made a League of Nations mandate of the British-ruled Union of South Africa following Germany’s losses in World War I.
The Dominions themselves also acquired mandates of their own: the Union of South Africa gained South West Africa (modern-day Namibia), Australia gained New Guinea, and New Zealand Western Samoa.

Parliament of South Africa

ParliamentSouth African ParliamentMP
Although this never occurred, in 1949, the South West Africa Affairs Act was amended to give representation in the Parliament of South Africa to whites in South West Africa, which gave them six seats in the House of Assembly and four in the Senate.

Senate of South Africa

SenateSenatorSenate of the Union of South Africa
Although this never occurred, in 1949, the South West Africa Affairs Act was amended to give representation in the Parliament of South Africa to whites in South West Africa, which gave them six seats in the House of Assembly and four in the Senate.
The elected Senators were chosen by an Electoral College, composed of the members of South-West Africa's Legislative Assembly and the six members of the House of Assembly representing the territory.

Bantustan

Bantustanshomelandshomeland
The South African authorities established 10 bantustans in South West Africa in the late 1960s and early 1970s in accordance with the Odendaal Commission, three of which were granted self-rule.
A Bantustan (also known as Bantu homeland, black homeland, black state or simply homeland; Bantoestan) was a territory set aside for black inhabitants of South Africa and South West Africa (now Namibia), as part of the policy of apartheid.

Afrikaners

AfrikanerAfrikaanerAfrikaner people
This was to the advantage of the National Party, which enjoyed strong support from the predominantly Afrikaner and ethnic German white population in the territory.
They also constituted 9.3% of the population in neighbouring South West Africa.

House of Assembly of South Africa

House of AssemblyHouse of Assembly of the Union of South AfricaSouth African House of Assembly
Although this never occurred, in 1949, the South West Africa Affairs Act was amended to give representation in the Parliament of South Africa to whites in South West Africa, which gave them six seats in the House of Assembly and four in the Senate.
In 1949, the South West Africa Affairs Amendment Act extended parliament representation to South West Africa's white minority, who elected six MPs to the House of Assembly.

National Party (South Africa)

National PartyNPNationalist Party
This was to the advantage of the National Party, which enjoyed strong support from the predominantly Afrikaner and ethnic German white population in the territory.
In a move unrecognised by the rest of the world, the former German colony of South-West Africa (now Namibia), which South Africa had occupied in World War I, was effectively incorporated into South Africa as a League of Nations mandate, with seven members elected to represent its White citizens in the Parliament of South Africa.

Fox Odendaal

Odendaal PlanOdendaal CommissionFrans Hendrik Odendaal
The South African authorities established 10 bantustans in South West Africa in the late 1960s and early 1970s in accordance with the Odendaal Commission, three of which were granted self-rule.
The Odendaal Report, as it was called, contained a series of proposals (The Odendaal Plan) regarding the establishment of territories dedicated to the "separate development" of the different ethnic groups in South-West Africa (Namibia today).

Enclave and exclave

exclaveenclaveexclaves
In 1977, South Africa transferred control of Walvis Bay back to the Cape Province, thereby making it an exclave.

Caprivi Strip

CapriviCaprivi areaCaprivi region
It was named the Caprivi Strip (Caprivizipfel) after the German Chancellor Leo von Caprivi.
It remained under direct de facto control of the South African government in Pretoria until 1980, when its administration was transferred to South Africa's administration in Windhoek.

List of colonial governors of South West Africa

Administrator-General of South West AfricaAdministrator of South West AfricaList of colonial governors of South-West Africa
South West Africa was the colonial predecessor of the modern day Republic of Namibia from when the territory was controlled by the German Empire (as German South West Africa) and later by South Africa.

History of Namibia

Namibian independenceindependenceNamibian history
South Africa objected arguing that a majority of the territory's people were content with South African rule.

South West Africa Territorial Force

South West African Territorial ForceSWATFSouth-West Africa Territorial Force
The South West Africa Territorial Force (SWATF) was an auxiliary arm of the South African Defence Force (SADF) and comprised the armed forces of South West Africa (now Namibia) from 1977 to 1989.

South African Border War

Namibian War of IndependenceNamibian independenceBorder War
The South African Border War, also known as the Namibian War of Independence, and sometimes denoted in South Africa as the Angolan Bush War, was a largely asymmetric conflict that occurred in Namibia (then South West Africa), Zambia, and Angola from 26 August 1966 to 21 March 1990.

Ondangwa

OndanguaOmashakaOndangwa, Namibia
When the British took over South West Africa during World War I, they also came to Ovamboland and in 1915 chose Ondangwa as the location of their administration.

South West African Police

SWAPOLPolicepolice force
The South West African Police, often abbreviated to SWAPOL, was the national police force of South West Africa (today Namibia).

SWAPO

South West Africa People's OrganizationSWAPO PartySouth-West Africa People's Organisation
There was a protracted struggle between South Africa and forces fighting for independence, particularly after the formation of the South West Africa People's Organisation (SWAPO) in 1960.
Though the organisation rejected the term South West Africa and insisted on replacing it with Namibia, the organisation's own name—derived from the territory's old name—was too deeply rooted in the independence movement to be changed.

Independent Economic Party (Namibia)

The Independent Economic Party, initially known as the Mandate Party, was a political party in South West Africa, today Namibia.