A report on Sovereign state

Member states of the United Nations (UN), as defined by the UN.
De facto map of control of the world, May 2019
Member states of the United Nations (UN), as defined by the UN (blue), as well as observer states (green), non-member states (orange), and non-self-governing territories (grey).

Political entity represented by one centralized government that has supreme legitimate authority over territory.

- Sovereign state
Member states of the United Nations (UN), as defined by the UN.

22 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Australia

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Aboriginal rock art in the Kimberley region of Western Australia
Landing of James Cook at Botany Bay on 29 April 1770 to claim Australia's eastern half for Great Britain
Tasmania's Port Arthur penal settlement is one of eleven UNESCO World Heritage-listed Australian Convict Sites
The Big Picture, a painting by Tom Roberts, depicts the opening of the first Australian Parliament in 1901
The 1942 Bombing of Darwin, the first of over 100 Japanese air raids on Australia during World War II
Postwar migrants from Europe arriving in Australia in 1954
Topographic map of Australia. Dark green represents the lowest elevation and dark brown the highest
Heron Island, a coral cay in the southern Great Barrier Reef
Uluru in the semi-arid region of Central Australia
Basic geological regions of Australia, by age.
Köppen climate types of Australia.
The koala and the eucalyptus form an iconic Australian pair.
Parliament House, Canberra
A map of Australia's states and territories
Diplomatic missions of Australia
HMAS Canberra, a Canberra class landing helicopter dock, and HMAS Arunta, an Anzac-class frigate, sailing in formation
Australian energy resources and major export ports map
The Boddington Gold Mine in Western Australia is the nation's largest open cut mine.
Australia has one of the world's most highly urbanised populations with the majority living in metropolitan cities on the coast, such as Gold Coast, Queensland.
Australian residents by country of birth, 2016 census
Five Australian universities rank in the top 50 of the QS World University Rankings, including the Australian National University (19th).
The Royal Exhibition Building in Melbourne was the first building in Australia to be listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2004.
Sidney Nolan's Snake mural (1970), held at the Museum of Old and New Art in Hobart, Tasmania, is inspired by the Aboriginal creation myth of the Rainbow Serpent, as well as desert flowers in bloom after a drought.
Actor playing the bushranger Ned Kelly in The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906), the world's first feature-length narrative film
The meringue-based pavlova is generally eaten at Christmas time.
The Melbourne Cricket Ground is strongly associated with the history and development of cricket and Australian rules football, Australia's two most popular spectator sports.
Fitzroy Island, one of 600 islands within the main archipelago of the Great Barrier Reef
Australian residents by country of birth, 2021 census
Australia is secular and hosts a diversity of religions. St Mary's Cathedral in Sydney belongs to the Roman Catholic Church, Australia's largest religious denomination.

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands.

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International recognition of the State of Palestine

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President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva of Brazil formally recognized the State of Palestine in December 2010.
President Dmitry Medvedev of Russia reconfirmed its support for the State of Palestine in January 2011.
UN observer state status voting results:

International recognition of the State of Palestine has been the objective of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) since the Palestinian Declaration of Independence formally established the de jure sovereign state on 15 November 1988 in Algiers, Algeria, at an extraordinary session in-exile of the Palestinian National Council.

Czechoslovakia

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Czechoslovakia during the interwar period and the Cold War
Czechoslovakia during the interwar period and the Cold War
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, founder and first president
Czechoslovak troops in Vladivostok (1918)
Czechoslovak declaration of independence rally in Prague on Wenceslas Square, 28 October 1918
A monument to Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk and Milan Štefánik—both key figures in early Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia in 1928
Linguistic map of Czechoslovakia in 1930
The partition of Czechoslovakia after Munich Agreement
The car in which Reinhard Heydrich was killed in 1942
Territory of the Second Czechoslovak Republic (1938–1939)
Socialist coat of arms in 1960–1989
Spartakiad in 1960
Czechoslovakia after 1969
The Visegrád Group signing ceremony in February 1991
Federal Assembly in Prague
Federative coat of arms in 1990–1992

Czechoslovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia ( Czech and Československo, Česko-Slovensko), was a sovereign state in Central Europe, created in October 1918, when it declared its independence from Austria-Hungary.

Palestinian National Authority

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Fatah-controlled government body that exercises partial civil control over West Bank areas "A" and "B" as a consequence of the 1993–1995 Oslo Accords.

Fatah-controlled government body that exercises partial civil control over West Bank areas "A" and "B" as a consequence of the 1993–1995 Oslo Accords.

Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton and Yasser Arafat at the Oslo Accords signing ceremony on 13 September 1993.
CIA remote-sensing map of areas governed by the Palestinian Authority, July 2008.
The Palestinian legislative election in 2006, Hamas (green) and Fatah (yellow)
Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen), President of the Palestinian Authority since 2005 (disputed since 2009).

The deal came amidst an international campaign for statehood advanced by the Abbas administration, which is expected to culminate in a request for admission into the General Assembly as a member state in September.

Recognition of both Israel and Palestine
Recognition of Israel only
Recognition of Israel, with some relations to Palestine
Recognition of Palestine only
Recognition of Palestine, with some relations to Israel

Diplomatic recognition

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Recognition of both Israel and Palestine
Recognition of Israel only
Recognition of Israel, with some relations to Palestine
Recognition of Palestine only
Recognition of Palestine, with some relations to Israel

Diplomatic recognition in international law is a unilateral declarative political act of a state that acknowledges an act or status of another state or government in control of a state (may be also a recognized state).

Government in exile

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A government in exile (abbreviated as GiE) is a political group that claims to be a country or semi-sovereign state's legitimate government, but is unable to exercise legal power and instead resides in a foreign country.

Great powers are recognized in an international structure such as the United Nations Security Council.

Great power

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Great powers are recognized in an international structure such as the United Nations Security Council.
German historian Leopold von Ranke in the mid-19th century attempted to scientifically document the great powers.
The Congress of Vienna by Jean-Baptiste Isabey, 1819
The "Big Four" at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919: David Lloyd George, Vittorio Emanuele Orlando, Georges Clemenceau and Woodrow Wilson
The "Big Three" of Europe at the Yalta Conference: Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin
The Allied leaders of the Asian and Pacific Theatre: Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Winston Churchill meeting at the Cairo Conference in 1943

A great power is a sovereign state that is recognized as having the ability and expertise to exert its influence on a global scale.

Rhodesia's Unilateral Declaration of Independence

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Southern Rhodesia (or Rhodesia), highlighted in red on a map of Africa
The Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland (1953–63)
Ian Smith replaced Winston Field as Southern Rhodesian Prime Minister in April 1964, and pledged to challenge Britain on independence.
UK Prime Minister Sir Alec Douglas-Home met Smith in London in September 1964.
Harold Wilson replaced Douglas-Home in October 1964, and proved a formidable opponent of Smith.
10 Downing Street, where Wilson received Smith in January 1965
The United States Declaration of Independence was used by the Rhodesians as the model for their UDI.
Rhodesian politicians signing the UDI under a portrait of the Queen
The front page of the Rhodesia Heralds 12 November 1965 edition. Note the blank spaces where content was removed by state censors.
Rhodesia House, the Rhodesian High Commission in London, represented Smith's government in the UK until 1969, and became a regular target for political activists.
Bishop Abel Muzorewa, the country's first black Prime Minister, whose unrecognised government revoked UDI in 1979 as part of the Lancaster House Agreement

The Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) was a statement adopted by the Cabinet of Rhodesia on 11 November 1965, announcing that Southern Rhodesia or simply Rhodesia, a British territory in southern Africa that had governed itself since 1923, now regarded itself as an independent sovereign state.

Ratifications and signatories of the treaty

Montevideo Convention

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Treaty signed at Montevideo, Uruguay, on December 26, 1933, during the Seventh International Conference of American States.

Treaty signed at Montevideo, Uruguay, on December 26, 1933, during the Seventh International Conference of American States.

Ratifications and signatories of the treaty

The Convention codifies the declarative theory of statehood as accepted as part of customary international law.

Legal person

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Any person or 'thing' that can do the things a human person is usually able to do in law – such as enter into contracts, sue and be sued, own property, and so on.

Any person or 'thing' that can do the things a human person is usually able to do in law – such as enter into contracts, sue and be sued, own property, and so on.

Sovereign states are legal persons.