Soviet Top League

Top LeagueSoviet LeagueSoviet championshipUSSR ChampionshipUSSR Top LeagueleagueClass AIUSSR Premier LeagueSoviet
The Soviet Top League, known after 1970 as the Higher League served as the top division of Soviet Union football from 1936 until 1991.wikipedia
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FC Dinamo Tbilisi

Dinamo TbilisiDynamo TbilisiDinamo-2 Tbilisi
Three of its representatives reached the finals of the European club tournaments on four occasions: FC Dynamo Kyiv, FC Dinamo Tbilisi, and FC Dynamo Moscow. The most popular clubs besides the above-mentioned were PFC CSKA Moscow, FC Ararat Yerevan, and FC Dinamo Tbilisi.
Dinamo Tbilisi was one of the most prominent clubs in Soviet football and a major contender in the Soviet Top League almost immediately after it was established in 1936.

FC Dynamo Moscow

Dynamo MoscowDinamo MoscowDynamo
Three of its representatives reached the finals of the European club tournaments on four occasions: FC Dynamo Kyiv, FC Dinamo Tbilisi, and FC Dynamo Moscow. The most prominent clubs of the league were FC Dynamo Kyiv, FC Spartak Moscow, and FC Dynamo Moscow.
Dynamo was the only club that had always played in the top tier of Soviet football (along with Dynamo Kyiv) and of Russian football from the end of the Soviet era until they were relegated in 2016.

Russian Premier League

Russian Football Premier LeaguePremier LeagueRussian Top League
In the same way that the international community widely considers Russia to be the political successor state to the Soviet Union, UEFA considers the Russian Premier League to have succeeded the Soviet Top League.
In Russia, the six Russian teams who had played in the Soviet Top League in 1991 (CSKA Moscow, Spartak Moscow, Torpedo Moscow, Dynamo Moscow, Spartak Vladikavkaz, and Lokomotiv Moscow) were supplemented with 14 teams from lower divisions to form a 20-team Russian Top Division.

FC Spartak Moscow

Spartak MoscowSpartakSpartak Moskva
The most prominent clubs of the league were FC Dynamo Kyiv, FC Spartak Moscow, and FC Dynamo Moscow.
Having won 12 Soviet championships (second only to Dynamo Kyiv) and a record 10 Russian championships, it is the country's most successful club.

PFC CSKA Moscow

CSKA MoscowCSKAPFC CSKA-2 Moscow
The most popular clubs besides the above-mentioned were PFC CSKA Moscow, FC Ararat Yerevan, and FC Dinamo Tbilisi.
It won a total of 7 Soviet Top League championships and 5 Soviet Cups, including the double in the last-ever season in 1991.

FC Shakhtar Donetsk

Shakhtar DonetskShakhtarShakhtyor Stalino
Ukraine was also often represented by Shakhtar Donetsk (Miners) and later by Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk who were strong in the 1980s.
In the late Soviet period, Shakhtar was considered a tough mid-table club of the Soviet Top League and a cup competition specialist after winning the Soviet Cup two years in a row in 1961 and 1962.

FC Dnipro

Dnipro DnipropetrovskFC Dnipro DnipropetrovskDnipro
Ukraine was also often represented by Shakhtar Donetsk (Miners) and later by Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk who were strong in the 1980s.
During the Soviet era, the club was the second most successful club, based in Ukraine, that participated in the Soviet Top League, winning in 1983 and 1988.

PFC Krylia Sovetov Samara

FC Krylia Sovetov SamaraKrylia Sovetov SamaraKrylia Sovetov
Among other prominent Russian clubs were SKA Rostov/Donu (Army team), Zenit Leningrad (Zenith), and Krylia Sovietov Kuibyshev (Wings of the Soviets).

1937 Soviet Top League

19371937 season
The 1937 Soviet Top League was the third season of the Soviet Top League.

Commonwealth of Independent States Cup

CIS CupIndependent States CupCommonwealth Champions Cup
Since the fall of the Soviet Union, it has been suggested that the competition be re-established along the lines of the Commonwealth of Independent States Cup, but due to a lack of interest on various levels the venture has never implemented.
In its first years the tournament was popular in the territories of the former Soviet Union, including the most titled teams from the old Soviet Top League.

1939 Soviet Top League

1939League
1939 Soviet Top League was the fifth season of the Soviet Top League known at that time as Group A.

1940 Soviet Top League

1940
Following are the results of the 1940 Soviet Top League football championship.

1949 Soviet Top League

19491949 season1949 Soviet First Group
Following are the results of the 1949 Soviet Top League football championship.

1950 Soviet Top League

19501950 season1950 Soviet Class A
Following are the results of the 1950 Soviet Top League football championship.

1951 Soviet Top League

19511951 Soviet Class A
Following are the results of the 1951 Soviet Top League football championship.

FC Dinamo Minsk

Dinamo MinskDynamo MinskSpartak Minsk
It was founded in 1927 as part of the Soviet Dinamo Sports Society, and was the only club from the Byelorussian SSR that competed in the Soviet Top League, playing 39 of the 54 seasons, and winning the title in 1982.

FC Dynamo Saint Petersburg

FC Dynamo St. PetersburgFC Petrotrest St. PetersburgDynamo Saint Petersburg
They were a regular in the Soviet Top League until relegation in 1963.

Boris Paichadze

He made debut in Soviet Top League during that season, being able to score 13 goals in 12 games.

FC Lokomotiv Moscow

Lokomotiv MoscowLokomotivLokomotiv Moskva
Lokomotiv debuted in the first-ever Soviet football club championship with a game against Dynamo Leningrad on 22 May 1936.

Eduard Streltsov

Streltsov
In the first season of his comeback, the club won the Soviet championship; in 1968 Torpedo won the Soviet Cup.

Sergey Solovyov (footballer)

Sergei SolovyovSergey Solovyov
He made his professional debut in the Soviet Top League in 1939 for FC Dynamo Leningrad.

Nikita Simonyan

Nikita (Mkrtych) SimonianFootball player Nikita Pavlovic SimonyanSimonyan
For the first match of the Soviet Top League, Simonyan played in Sukhumi against FC Dinamo Minsk.

Pakhtakor Tashkent FK

PakhtakorPakhtakor TashkentFC Pakhtakor Tashkent
Pakhtakor was the only Uzbek club to play in the top-level Soviet football league and was the only Central Asian club to appear in a Soviet Cup final.