Soviet invasion of Poland

invaded Polandinvasion of PolandSoviet invasionSoviet invasion of Poland (1939)invaded eastern PolandSoviet invasion of Poland in 1939Soviet Union invaded PolandinvadedSovietSoviet occupation
The Soviet invasion of Poland was a military operation by the Soviet Union without a formal declaration of war.wikipedia
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Invasion of Poland

German invasion of Polandinvaded PolandSeptember Campaign
On 17 September 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Poland from the east, sixteen days after Germany invaded Poland from the west.
The Soviets invaded Poland on 17 September.

Soviet repressions of Polish citizens (1939–1946)

Soviet repressions of Polish citizens (1939-1946)Soviet repressions of Polish citizens (1939–46)Soviet repressions of Polish citizens
A Soviet campaign of political murders and other forms of repression, targeting Polish figures of authority such as military officers, police and priests, began with a wave of arrests and summary executions.
In the aftermath of the German and Soviet invasion of Poland, which took place in September 1939, the territory of Poland was divided in half between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.

Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact

Molotov-Ribbentrop PactNazi-Soviet PactHitler-Stalin Pact
The Soviet (as well as German) invasion of Poland was indirectly indicated in the "secret additional protocol" of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact signed on 23 August 1939, which approximately divided Poland into "spheres of influence" of the two powers and questioned the future existence of the Polish state.
Soviet leader Joseph Stalin ordered the Soviet invasion of Poland on 17 September, one day after a Soviet–Japanese ceasefire at the Khalkhin Gol came into effect.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
On 17 September 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Poland from the east, sixteen days after Germany invaded Poland from the west.
World War II began with the Nazi German invasion of Poland on 1 September 1939, followed by the Soviet invasion of Poland on 17 September.

Operation Barbarossa

German invasion of the Soviet Unioninvasion of the Soviet UnionGerman invasion
Soviet forces occupied eastern Poland until the summer of 1941, when they were driven out by the German army in the course of Operation Barbarossa.
The conclusion of this pact was followed by the German invasion of Poland on 1 September that triggered the outbreak of World War II in Europe, then the Soviet invasion of Poland that led to the annexation of the eastern part of the country.

Yalta Conference

YaltaYalta Agreementalready agreed
An agreement at the Yalta Conference permitted the Soviet Union to annex almost all of their Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact portion of the Second Polish Republic, compensating the Polish People's Republic with the greater southern part of East Prussia and territories east of the Oder–Neisse line.
Accordingly, Stalin stipulated that Polish government-in-exile demands were not negotiable: the Soviet Union would keep the territory of eastern Poland they had already annexed in 1939, and Poland was to be compensated for that by extending its western borders at the expense of Germany.

Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic

Ukrainian SSRSoviet UkraineUkraine
The Soviet Union appended the annexed territories to the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic and the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic.
In September 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Poland and occupied Galician lands inhabited by Ukrainians, Poles and Jews adding it to the territory of the Ukrainian SSR.

Białystok

BialystokBelostokBialystok, Poland
This agreement recognized the status quo as the new official border between the two countries with the exception of the region around Białystok and a minor part of Galicia east of the San River around Przemyśl, which were later returned to Poland. Due to stubborn Polish defense and lack of fuel, the German advance stalled, and the situation stabilized for the areas east of the line Augustów – Grodno – Białystok – Kobryń – Kowel – Żółkiew – Lwów – Żydaczów – Stryj – Turka.
With the beginning of World War II, Poland was invaded by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, and initially the city came under Soviet occupation, as a result of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact.

Kresy

Eastern PolandEastern BorderlandsKresy Wschodnie
On 17 September 1939 the Soviet Red Army invaded the Kresy regions in accordance with the secret protocol.
As a consequence of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, on September 17, 1939, the Kresy territories were annexed by the Soviet Union (see Soviet invasion of Poland), and a significant part of the ethnic Polish population of Kresy was deported to other areas of the Soviet Union including Siberia and Kazakhstan.

Red Army

Soviet Red ArmySoviet ArmySoviet
On 17 September 1939 the Soviet Red Army invaded the Kresy regions in accordance with the secret protocol. The Red Army, which vastly outnumbered the Polish defenders, achieved its targets encountering only limited resistance.
It began with a Soviet offensive on 30 November 1939—three months after the start of World War II and the Soviet invasion of Poland, and ended on 13 March 1940 with the Moscow Peace Treaty.

Przemyśl

PrzemyslPeremyshlPeremyshl`
This agreement recognized the status quo as the new official border between the two countries with the exception of the region around Białystok and a minor part of Galicia east of the San River around Przemyśl, which were later returned to Poland.
During the Soviet occupation Przemyśl was incorporated to the Ukrainian SSR in the atmosphere of NKVD terror as thousands of Jews were ordered to be deported.

Romanian Bridgehead

evacuated to Romaniafled to RomaniaPolish refugees
Polish forces gradually withdrew to the southeast where they prepared for a long defence of the Romanian Bridgehead and awaited the French and British support and relief that they were expecting.
The Soviet Union invaded from the east in early hours of 17 September, breaking the non-aggression pact with Poland, while the French, despite their promises, had taken no significant offensive against Germany, making it impossible for the Polish army to hold out, at least in eastern parts of the country.

Latvia

Republic of LatviaLatvianLAT
The Soviet sphere initially included Latvia, Estonia and Finland.
A week later, on 1 September 1939, Germany and on 17 September, the Soviet Union invaded Poland.

Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic

Belarusian SSRByelorussian SSRBelorussian SSR
The Soviet Union appended the annexed territories to the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic and the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic.
In September 1939, the Soviet Union, following the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact with Nazi Germany, occupied eastern Poland after the 1939 invasion of Poland.

Propaganda in the Soviet Union

Soviet propagandapropagandaSoviet propaganda during World War II
The Soviet government announced it was acting to protect the Ukrainians and Belarusians who lived in the eastern part of Poland, because the Polish state – according to Soviet propaganda – had collapsed in the face of the Nazi German attack and could no longer guarantee the security of its own citizens.
Anti-Polish propaganda was used during the Soviet invasion of Poland and during the annexation of Eastern Poland 1939–1941.

Soviet order of battle for invasion of Poland in 1939

Ukrainian FrontBelorussian FrontBelarusian Front
Comandarm 2nd rank Mikhail Kovalyov led the Red Army in the invasion on the Belarusian Front, while Comandarm 1st rank Semyon Timoshenko commanded the invasion on the Ukrainian Front.
The Soviet order of battle for the invasion of Poland in 1939 details the major combat units arrayed for the Soviet surprise attack on Poland on September 17, 1939.

Second Polish Republic

PolandPolishinterwar Poland
Subsequent military operations lasted for the following 20 days and ended on 6 October 1939 with the two-way division and annexation of the entire territory of the Second Polish Republic by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.
On that day, Germany and Slovakia attacked Poland, and on 17 September the Soviets attacked eastern Poland.

Battle of Wilno (1939)

Battle of Wilnoa two-day battlecapture of Vilna by Soviet forces
Soviet forces had taken Wilno (now Vilnius) on 19 September after a two-day battle, and they took Grodno on 24 September after a four-day battle.
The Battle of Wilno was fought by the Polish Army against the Soviet invasion of Poland in 1939, which accompanied the German Invasion of Poland in accordance with Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact.

Battles of Khalkhin Gol

Battle of Khalkhin GolNomonhan IncidentBattle of Khalkin Gol
The undeclared war between the Soviet Union and the Empire of Japan at the Battles of Khalkhin Gol (Nomonhan) in the Far East ended with the Molotov–Tojo agreement between the USSR and Japan which was signed on 15 September, with a ceasefire taking effect on 16 September.
Free from a threat in the Far East, Stalin proceeded with the Soviet invasion of Poland on 17 September.

Battle of Grodno (1939)

Battle of Grodnodefence of GrodnoGrodno
Soviet forces had taken Wilno (now Vilnius) on 19 September after a two-day battle, and they took Grodno on 24 September after a four-day battle.
The Battle of Grodno took place between 21 September and 24 September 1939, during the Soviet invasion of Poland.

Peace of Riga

Treaty of RigaRiga Peace TreatyPeace Treaty of Riga
The parties signed the formal peace treaty, the Peace of Riga, on 18 March 1921, dividing the disputed territories between Poland and Soviet Russia.
While the Peace of Riga led to a two-decade stabilisation of Soviet-Polish relations, conflict was renewed with the Soviet invasion of Poland during World War II.

Grodno

HrodnaHrodnoGrodna
Soviet forces had taken Wilno (now Vilnius) on 19 September after a two-day battle, and they took Grodno on 24 September after a four-day battle. Due to stubborn Polish defense and lack of fuel, the German advance stalled, and the situation stabilized for the areas east of the line Augustów – Grodno – Białystok – Kobryń – Kowel – Żółkiew – Lwów – Żydaczów – Stryj – Turka.
In the course of the Soviet invasion of Poland (initiated on 17 September 1939) heavy fighting took place in the city between Soviet and improvised Polish forces, composed mostly of march battalions and volunteers.

Zhovkva

ŻółkiewZolkievZolkiew
Due to stubborn Polish defense and lack of fuel, the German advance stalled, and the situation stabilized for the areas east of the line Augustów – Grodno – Białystok – Kobryń – Kowel – Żółkiew – Lwów – Żydaczów – Stryj – Turka.
In 1939, following the Soviet invasion of Poland, Żółkiew, together with the rest of Poland's Kresy Wschodnie, was occupied by the Soviet Union until 1941.

Renault R35

Renault R-35R35Renault R 35
A French Navy ship carrying Renault R35 tanks for Poland approached the Romanian port of Constanta.
The remaining tanks - four R35s and three H35s - were put into service with the improvised Dubno Operational Group and took part in the battles of Krasne on 19 September (with the Soviets) and Kamionka Strumiłowa (with the Germans), during which all were destroyed.

Vilnius

VilnaWilnoVilnius, Lithuania
Soviet forces had taken Wilno (now Vilnius) on 19 September after a two-day battle, and they took Grodno on 24 September after a four-day battle.
On 19 September 1939, Vilnius was seized by the Soviet Union (which invaded Poland on 17 September).