Soviet occupation zone

Soviet Zone of OccupationSoviet ZoneSoviet Zone of occupation in GermanySoviet occupationSoviet Occupation Zone of GermanySovietSoviet Occupied ZoneSoviet sectorGermanySoviet Zone of Germany
The Soviet Occupation Zone (Sowjetische Besatzungszone (SBZ) or Ostzone; Советская оккупационная зона Германии, Sovetskaya okkupatsionnaya zona Germanii, "Soviet Occupation Zone of Germany") was the area of Germany occupied by the Soviet Union at the end of World War II in 1945.wikipedia
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Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
The Soviet Occupation Zone (Sowjetische Besatzungszone (SBZ) or Ostzone; Советская оккупационная зона Германии, Sovetskaya okkupatsionnaya zona Germanii, "Soviet Occupation Zone of Germany") was the area of Germany occupied by the Soviet Union at the end of World War II in 1945.
After the end of World War II in Europe and a period of Allied occupation, Austria was re-established as an independent country and two new German states were founded: West Germany, formed from the American, British, and French occupation zones, and East Germany, formed from the Soviet occupation zone.

East Germany

East GermanGerman Democratic RepublicGDR
On 7 October 1949 the German Democratic Republic (GDR), commonly referred to in English as East Germany, was established in the Soviet Occupation Zone.
It consisted of territory that was administered and occupied by Soviet forces at the end of World War II — the Soviet occupation zone of the Potsdam Agreement, bounded on the east by the Oder–Neisse line.

Soviet Military Administration in Germany

administeredSoviet Military AdministrationSoviet administration
According to the Potsdam Agreement, the Soviet Military Administration in Germany (German initials: SMAD) was assigned responsibility for the eastern portion of Germany.
The Soviet Military Administration in Germany (Советская военная администрация в Германии, СВАГ; Sovyetskaya Voyennaya Administratsiya v Germanii, SVAG; Sowjetische Militäradministration in Deutschland, SMAD) was the Soviet military government, headquartered in Berlin-Karlshorst, that directly ruled the Soviet occupation zone of Germany from the German surrender in May 1945 until after the establishment of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) in October 1949.

Potsdam Agreement

PotsdamTreaty of Potsdamagreed
According to the Potsdam Agreement, the Soviet Military Administration in Germany (German initials: SMAD) was assigned responsibility for the eastern portion of Germany.

Social Democratic Party of Germany

SPDSocial Democratic PartySocial Democrats
In April 1946, the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) and the Communist Party of Germany (KPD) merged to form the Socialist Unity Party which later became the governing party of the GDR.
In the Soviet zone of occupation the Soviets forced the Social Democrats to form a common party with the Communists, resulting in the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (SED).

Communist Party of Germany

Communist PartyKPDCommunist
In April 1946, the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) and the Communist Party of Germany (KPD) merged to form the Socialist Unity Party which later became the governing party of the GDR.
The party was revived in divided postwar West and East Germany and won seats in the first Bundestag (West German Parliament) elections in 1949, but its support collapsed following the establishment of a communist state in the Soviet occupation zone of Germany.

Socialist Unity Party of Germany

SEDSocialist Unity PartySocialist Unity Party (''"Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands"'' / SED)
In April 1946, the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) and the Communist Party of Germany (KPD) merged to form the Socialist Unity Party which later became the governing party of the GDR.
The SED was founded on 21 April 1946 by a merger of the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) and the Communist Party of Germany (KPD) which was based in the Soviet occupation zone of Germany and the Soviet-occupied sector of Berlin.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The Soviet Occupation Zone (Sowjetische Besatzungszone (SBZ) or Ostzone; Советская оккупационная зона Германии, Sovetskaya okkupatsionnaya zona Germanii, "Soviet Occupation Zone of Germany") was the area of Germany occupied by the Soviet Union at the end of World War II in 1945.
Germany had been de facto divided, and two independent states, the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic, were created within the borders of Allied and Soviet occupation zones.

National Front of the German Democratic Republic

National FrontNational Front (East Germany)National Front of Democratic Germany
The SMAD allowed four political parties to develop, though they were all required to work together under an alliance known as the "Democratic Bloc" (later the National Front).
The National Front was the successor to the Demokratischer Block which had been founded in the Soviet occupation zone.

Democratic Bloc (East Germany)

Democratic BlocBloc of the Anti-Fascist Democratic PartiesBloc parties
The SMAD allowed four political parties to develop, though they were all required to work together under an alliance known as the "Democratic Bloc" (later the National Front).
After consultation by Anton Ackermann, and Walter Ulbricht Gustav Sobottka on 4 June 1945 in Moscow allowed the Order № 2 of 10 of the Soviet Military Administration in Germany in June 1945, the formation and activity of anti-fascist parties in the Soviet Occupation Zone.

Line of contact

demarcation linefirst met
By the time forces of the United States and Britain began to meet Soviet forces, forming a Line of contact, significant areas of what would become the Soviet zone of Germany were outside Soviet control.
The city of Leipzig, in Saxony, was probably the largest of the cities captured by the Americans that were inside the areas to be later passed to the Soviets.

Thuringia

ThüringenFree State of ThuringiaThuringen
After Prussia was dissolved by the Allied powers in 1947, the area was divided between the German states (Länder) of Brandenburg, Mecklenburg, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia.
After being controlled briefly by the US, from July 1945, the state of Thuringia came under the Soviet occupation zone, and was expanded to include parts of Prussian Saxony, such as the areas around Erfurt, Mühlhausen, and Nordhausen.

NKVD special camps in Germany 1945–50

NKVD special campNKVD special campsNKVD special camps in Germany 1945–49
The SMAD set up ten "special camps" for the detention of Germans, making use of some former Nazi concentration camps.
A couple of weeks after the war had come to an end, the prisoners were subsequently transferred to the Soviet Occupation Zone.

Allied-occupied Germany

GermanyBritish occupation zoneoccupied Germany
The SBZ was one of the four Allied occupation zones of Germany created at the end of World War II.

History of East Germany

History of the German Democratic Republicsingle-party dictatorshipBodenreform
This area was occupied by the Soviet Union at the end of World War II, with the remaining German territory to the west occupied by the British, American, and French armies.

Brandenburg

State of BrandenburgBrandenburg, GermanyBB
After Prussia was dissolved by the Allied powers in 1947, the area was divided between the German states (Länder) of Brandenburg, Mecklenburg, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia.
The remainder of the province became a state in the Soviet Zone of occupation in Germany when Prussia was dissolved in 1947.

Cold War

The Cold WarCold War eraCold-War
In 1952, with the Cold War political confrontation well underway, Joseph Stalin sounded out the Western Powers about the prospect of a united Germany which would be non-aligned (the "Stalin Note").
The Soviet Union proclaimed its zone of occupation in Germany the German Democratic Republic that October.

Bizone

TrizoneBizoniaBizonal
The Soviet Union, which encouraged and partly carried out the post-war expulsions of Germans from the areas under its rule, stopped delivering agricultural products from its zone in Germany to the more industrial western zones, thereby failing to fulfill its obligations under the Potsdam Agreements to provide supplies for the expellees, whose possessions had been confiscated.

Saxony-Anhalt

AnhaltSachsen-AnhaltSaxony Anhalt
After Prussia was dissolved by the Allied powers in 1947, the area was divided between the German states (Länder) of Brandenburg, Mecklenburg, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia.
By early July the US Army withdrew from the former Prussian Province of Saxony to make way for the Red Army to take it as part of the Soviet occupation zone, as agreed by the London Protocol in 1944.

Prussia

PrussianPrussian statePrussian army
In 1945, the Soviet occupation zone consisted primarily of the central portions of Prussia.
In the Soviet occupation zone, which became East Germany (officially, the German Democratic Republic) in 1949, the former Prussian territories were reorganised into the states of Brandenburg and Saxony-Anhalt, with the remaining parts of the Province of Pomerania going to Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

Georgy Zhukov

ZhukovMarshal ZhukovG. K. Zhukov
After the German capitulation, Zhukov became the first commander of the Soviet occupation zone.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
The Soviet Occupation Zone (Sowjetische Besatzungszone (SBZ) or Ostzone; Советская оккупационная зона Германии, Sovetskaya okkupatsionnaya zona Germanii, "Soviet Occupation Zone of Germany") was the area of Germany occupied by the Soviet Union at the end of World War II in 1945.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
By the time forces of the United States and Britain began to meet Soviet forces, forming a Line of contact, significant areas of what would become the Soviet zone of Germany were outside Soviet control.

Nazi concentration camps

Nazi concentration campconcentration campconcentration camps
The SMAD set up ten "special camps" for the detention of Germans, making use of some former Nazi concentration camps.

Mecklenburg

Duchy of MecklenburgMecklenburg-StargardMecklenburg, Germany
After Prussia was dissolved by the Allied powers in 1947, the area was divided between the German states (Länder) of Brandenburg, Mecklenburg, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia.