Soyuz-2

Soyuz-2.1aSoyuz-2.1bSoyuz-2-1bSoyuz 2.1aSoyuz 2.1bSoyuz-STASoyuz ST-BSoyuzSoyuz 2-1aSoyuz ST
Soyuz-2 (GRAU index 14A14) is the collective designation for the 21st-century version of the Russian Soyuz rocket.wikipedia
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Ensemble de Lancement Soyouz

ELSSoyuz Launch ComplexGuianan Soyuz launch site
Commercial Soyuz-2 flights are contracted by Starsem, and have launched from Site 31 at Baikonur and ELS (l'Ensemble de Lancement Soyouz), which has been built at the Guiana Space Centre on the northern coast of South America.
It is used by Soyuz-ST rockets: modified versions of the Soyuz-2 optimised for launch from Kourou under Soyuz at the Guiana Space Centre programme.

Baikonur Cosmodrome Site 31

31/6Site 31/6LC-31/6
Soyuz-2 rockets were first launched from Site 31 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, and Site 43 at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, launch facilities shared with earlier R-7 derived rockets including the Soyuz-U and Molniya.
From 2011 onwards, it was supposed to be the launch site for manned Soyuz missions to the International Space Station, when launches switched from the Soyuz-FG carrier rocket to the Soyuz-2, which was unable to use the launch pad at Site 1/5.

Launch vehicle

carrier rocketlaunch systemspace launch vehicle
In its basic form, it is a three-stage carrier rocket for placing payloads into low Earth orbit.

CoRoT

COROT MissionCOnvection ROtation and planetary Transits (CoRoT)COROT spacecraft
CoRoT was launched at 14:28:00 UTC on 27 December 2006, atop a Soyuz 2.1b rocket, reporting first light on 18 January 2007.

Molniya-M

Molniya 8K78MMolniyaMolniya M
The Soyuz-2 has replaced the Molniya-M, Soyuz-U and Soyuz-FG since 2010, 2017 and 2019 respectively.
It will be replaced by the Soyuz-2/Fregat.

Soyuz-U

Soyuz 11A511USoyuz USoyuz
Soyuz-2 rockets were first launched from Site 31 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, and Site 43 at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, launch facilities shared with earlier R-7 derived rockets including the Soyuz-U and Molniya. The Soyuz-2 has replaced the Molniya-M, Soyuz-U and Soyuz-FG since 2010, 2017 and 2019 respectively.
Since 2013, both Soyuz-U and Soyuz-FG are gradually being replaced by the modernized Soyuz-2 launch vehicle.

Soyuz-FG

Soyuz FGFGSoyuz-FG rocket
The Soyuz-2 has replaced the Molniya-M, Soyuz-U and Soyuz-FG since 2010, 2017 and 2019 respectively.
The analog control system significantly limited the capabilities of this launcher, and it will eventually be replaced by Soyuz-2 in 2019.

Pleiades (satellite)

Pleiades satellitesPleiadesPléiades
The first launch, from Guiana, (17 December 2011 for Pléiades-HR 1A, SSOT, ELISA (4 satellites)) was a success.

Vostochny Cosmodrome

VostochnyIpromashpromVostochnyi Spaceport
In 2016 the new Vostochny Cosmodrome started operating Soyuz-2 flights as well, from its first launch pad called Site 1S.
In October 2015, it was announced that parts of the assembly complex for the Soyuz-2 rocket were designed for a different variant of the rocket and are too small, so that the planned launch date of the first Soyuz-2 from Vostochny Cosmodrome in December 2015 was under question.

Meridian 4

It was launched atop a Soyuz-2-1a/Fregat rocket from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in May 2011.

Soyuz (rocket family)

SoyuzSoyuz rocketSoyuz-Fregat
Soyuz-2 (GRAU index 14A14) is the collective designation for the 21st-century version of the Russian Soyuz rocket.
The venerable Soyuz launcher is gradually being replaced by a new version, now named Soyuz/ST (or Soyuz-2), which has a new digital guidance system and a highly modified third stage with a new engine.

Galileo (satellite navigation)

GalileoGalileo positioning systemGalileo project
The first launch, from Guiana, was a success (21 October 2011), for the first two Galileo IOV satellites.
The first two Galileo In-Orbit Validation satellites were launched by Soyuz ST-B flown from Guiana Space Centre on 21 October 2011, and the remaining two on 12 October 2012.

Meridian 1

Meridian 1 was the first Russian Government satellite to be launched by a Soyuz-2 rocket.

Meteor-M No.1

Meteor M-1No.1
It was launched on a Soyuz-2.1b rocket with a Fregat upper stage on 17 September 2009.

Kosmos 2441

Kosmos 2441 was launched by a Soyuz-2-1b carrier rocket flying from Site 43/4 of the Plesetsk Cosmodrome.

Meridian 2

Meridian 2 was launched on a Soyuz-2.1a rocket with a Fregat upper stage, from Site 43/4 at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome.

MetOp

MetOp-AMetOp-BEUMETSAT Polar System
The first attempt at launching a Soyuz-2 to orbit, with the MetOp-A satellite, occurred on 17 July 2006.

Vostochny Cosmodrome Site 1S

Site 1S1SLC-1S
In 2016 the new Vostochny Cosmodrome started operating Soyuz-2 flights as well, from its first launch pad called Site 1S.
It consists of a single pad for use by the Soyuz-2 rockets.

Kosmos 2474

A Soyuz-2-1b carrier rocket with a Fregat upper stage was used to perform the launch which took place at 20:15 UTC on 2 October 2011.

GLONASS-M

Uragan-M
On October 2, 2011, the first launch of single Uragan-M satellite was performed by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M which put Kosmos 2474 on orbit from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome.

Kosmos 2478

A Soyuz-2-1b carrier rocket with a Fregat upper stage was used to perform the launch which took place at 08:26 UTC on 28 November 2011.

Persona (satellite)

PersonaKosmos-2524Persona-1 (C.2441)
The first satellite, identified as Kosmos 2441, was launched into a 750 km sun synchronous orbit on 26 July 2008, atop a Soyuz-2.1b carrier rocket from LC-43/4 at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome.

Meridian 5

Meridian 5 was launched on a Soyuz-2.1b rocket with a Fregat upper stage, from Site 43/4 at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome.

Plesetsk Cosmodrome

PlesetskPlesetsk test sitePlesetsk 132/1
Soyuz-2 rockets were first launched from Site 31 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, and Site 43 at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, launch facilities shared with earlier R-7 derived rockets including the Soyuz-U and Molniya.