Space opera

space-operaspace operasinterstellarscience fictionepicspace epicspace opera novelspace opera science fictionspace operaticspace-opera film
Space opera is a subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes space warfare, melodramatic adventure, interplanetary battles, chivalric romance and risk-taking.wikipedia
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Space warfare in fiction

space warfarespace combatSpace warfare in fiction: Television and movies
Space opera is a subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes space warfare, melodramatic adventure, interplanetary battles, chivalric romance and risk-taking.
An interplanetary, or more often an interstellar or intergalactic war, has become a staple plot device in space operas.

Flash Gordon

comic strip of the same nameAnnihilantsFlash
An early film which was based on space-opera comic strips was Flash Gordon (1936) created by Alex Raymond.
Flash Gordon is the hero of a space opera adventure comic strip created by and originally drawn by Alex Raymond.

Star Wars

Star Wars'' franchiseStarwars.comStar Wars universe
The Star Wars franchise (1977–present) created by George Lucas brought a great deal of attention to the subgenre.
Star Wars is an American epic space-opera media franchise created by George Lucas.

Science fiction

sci-fiscience-fictionSci Fi
Space opera is a subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes space warfare, melodramatic adventure, interplanetary battles, chivalric romance and risk-taking.
It is often called the first great space opera.

George Lucas

LucasJett LucasGeorge
The Star Wars franchise (1977–present) created by George Lucas brought a great deal of attention to the subgenre.
Lucas's next film, the epic space opera Star Wars (1977), had a troubled production but was a surprise hit, becoming the highest-grossing film at the time, winning six Academy Awards and sparking a cultural phenomenon.

Wilson Tucker

Bob TuckerWilson "Bob" TuckerWilson (Bob) Tucker
The term "space opera" was coined in 1941 by fan writer and author Wilson Tucker as a pejorative term in an article in issue 36 of Le Zombie, a science fiction fanzine.
He became a prominent analyst and critic of the field, as well as the coiner of such terms as "space opera".

C. I. Defontenay

C.I. DefontenayCharlemagne-Ischir Defontenay
Early proto-space opera was written by several 19th century French authors, for example, Les Posthumes (1802) by Nicolas-Edme Rétif, Star ou Psi de Cassiopée: Histoire Merveilleuse de l’un des Mondes de l’Espace (1854) by C. I. Defontenay and Lumen (1872) by Camille Flammarion.
Defontenay's 1854 Star, ou Psi Cassiopea is seen by some as an example of proto-space opera.

Leigh Brackett

a Hollywood screenwriterAlpha Centauri or Die!Brackett, Leigh
In particular, they disputed the claims that space operas were obsolete, and Del Rey Books labeled reissues of earlier work of Leigh Brackett as space opera.
Often referred to as the "Queen of Space Opera", Brackett also wrote planetary romance.

E. E. Smith

E. E. "Doc" SmithE.E. SmithEdward E. Smith
However, the author cited most often as the true father of the genre is E. E. "Doc" Smith.
He is sometimes called the father of space opera.

John W. Campbell

John W. Campbell, Jr.John W. Campbell Jr.John Campbell
Smith's later Lensman series and the works of Edmond Hamilton, John W. Campbell, and Jack Williamson in the 1930s and 1940s were popular with readers and much imitated by other writers.
Campbell wrote super-science space opera under his own name and stories under his primary pseudonym, Don A. Stuart.

The Skylark of Space

Skylark of SpaceSkylarkSkylark Three
His first published work, The Skylark of Space (Amazing Stories, August–October 1928), written in collaboration with Lee Hawkins Garby, is often called the first great space opera.
The Skylark of Space is considered to be one of the earliest novels of interstellar travel and the first example of space opera.

Joseph Schlossel

J. Schlossel
Early stories of this type include J. Schlossel's "Invaders from Outside" (Weird Tales, January 1925), The Second Swarm (Amazing Stories Quarterly, spring 1928) and The Star Stealers (Weird Tales, February 1929), Ray Cummings' Tarrano the Conqueror (1925), and Edmond Hamilton's Across Space (1926) and Crashing Suns (Weird Tales, August–September 1928).
Joseph Schlossel (1902-1977) was a science fiction writer, a pioneer of the space opera genre.

A Trip to Mars

HimmelskibetHimmelskibet'' (film)
In film, the genre probably began with the 1918 Danish film, Himmelskibet.
Phil Hardy says it is "the film that marked the beginning of the space opera subgenre of science fiction," but notes that Denmark did not make another science fiction film until Reptilicus in 1962.

The Struggle for Empire: A Story of the Year 2236

One critic cites Robert William Cole's The Struggle for Empire: A Story of the Year 2236 as the first space opera.
The Struggle for Empire: A Story of the Year 2236 written by Robert William Cole and first published in 1900 is a science fiction novel known as one of the first space operas.

Edmond Hamilton

Edmund HamiltonThe Star Kingsscience fiction author
Smith's later Lensman series and the works of Edmond Hamilton, John W. Campbell, and Jack Williamson in the 1930s and 1940s were popular with readers and much imitated by other writers.
He was very popular as an author of space opera, a subgenre he created along with E.E. "Doc" Smith.

Paul J. McAuley

Paul McAuleyWhite DevilsIn The Mouth of the Whale
According to author Paul J. McAuley, a number of mostly British writers began to reinvent space opera in the 1970s (although most non-British critics tend to dispute the British claim to dominance in the new space opera arena). McAuley and Michael Levy identify Iain M. Banks, Stephen Baxter, M. John Harrison, Alastair Reynolds, McAuley himself, Ken MacLeod, Peter F. Hamilton, Ann Leckie, and Justina Robson as the most-notable practitioners of the new space opera.
McAuley began with far-future space opera Four Hundred Billion Stars, its sequel Eternal Light, and the planetary-colony adventure Of the Fall.

Alastair Reynolds

Alistair ReynoldsRevelation SpaceReynolds
McAuley and Michael Levy identify Iain M. Banks, Stephen Baxter, M. John Harrison, Alastair Reynolds, McAuley himself, Ken MacLeod, Peter F. Hamilton, Ann Leckie, and Justina Robson as the most-notable practitioners of the new space opera. Examples are seen in the works of Alastair Reynolds or the movie The Last Starfighter.
He specialises in hard science fiction and space opera.

Horse opera

horse operasoat opera
The term has no relation to music, but is instead a play on the terms "soap opera" and "horse opera", the latter of which was coined during the 1930s to indicate clichéd and formulaic Western movies.
The term "horse opera" is quite loosely defined; it does not specify a distinct subgenre of the Western (as "space opera" does with regard to the science fiction genre).

Baen Books

BaenBaen's BarBaen.com
One of the most notable publishers Baen Books specialises in space opera and military science fiction, publishing many of the aforementioned authors, who have won Hugo Awards.
In science fiction, it emphasizes space opera, hard science fiction, and military science fiction.

Le Zombie

The term "space opera" was coined in 1941 by fan writer and author Wilson Tucker as a pejorative term in an article in issue 36 of Le Zombie, a science fiction fanzine.
Many phrases and fan writing techniques have their origins in the pages of Le Zombie, including the term space opera, and the use of the slash to indicate a thought was struck through.

The Last Starfighter

1984 science fiction filmfilm of the same nameLast Starfigher
Examples are seen in the works of Alastair Reynolds or the movie The Last Starfighter.
The Last Starfighter is a 1984 American space opera film directed by Nick Castle.

Amazing Stories

AmazingAmazing Science FictionAmazing Science Fiction Stories
His first published work, The Skylark of Space (Amazing Stories, August–October 1928), written in collaboration with Lee Hawkins Garby, is often called the first great space opera. Despite this seemingly early beginning, it was not until the late 1920s that the space opera proper began to appear regularly in pulp magazines such as Amazing Stories.
Smith's The Skylark of Space, written between 1915 and 1920, was a seminal space opera that found no ready market when Argosy stopped printing science fiction.

Peter F. Hamilton

Peter HamiltonPeter F HamiltonHamilton
McAuley and Michael Levy identify Iain M. Banks, Stephen Baxter, M. John Harrison, Alastair Reynolds, McAuley himself, Ken MacLeod, Peter F. Hamilton, Ann Leckie, and Justina Robson as the most-notable practitioners of the new space opera.
He is best known for writing space opera.

Ken MacLeod

Engines of Light TrilogyEngines of Light
McAuley and Michael Levy identify Iain M. Banks, Stephen Baxter, M. John Harrison, Alastair Reynolds, McAuley himself, Ken MacLeod, Peter F. Hamilton, Ann Leckie, and Justina Robson as the most-notable practitioners of the new space opera.
He is part of a group of British science fiction writers who specialise in hard science fiction and space opera.

M. John Harrison

M John HarrisonMichael John HarrisonMichael Harrison
McAuley and Michael Levy identify Iain M. Banks, Stephen Baxter, M. John Harrison, Alastair Reynolds, McAuley himself, Ken MacLeod, Peter F. Hamilton, Ann Leckie, and Justina Robson as the most-notable practitioners of the new space opera. Writers such as Poul Anderson and Gordon R. Dickson had kept the large-scale space adventure form alive through the 1950s, followed by writers like M. John Harrison and C. J. Cherryh in the 1970s.
During 1974 Harrison's third novel was published, the space opera The Centauri Device (described prior to its publication, by New Worlds magazine, as "a sort of hippie space opera in the baroque tradition of Alfred Bester and Charles Harness). An extract was published in New Worlds in advance of the novel's publication, with the title "The Wolf That Follows". The novel's protagonist, space tramp John Truck, is the last of the Centaurans, victims of a genocide. Rival groups need him to arm the most powerful weapon in the galaxy: the Centauri Device, which will respond only to the genetic code of a true Centauran.