Spanish–American War

Spanish-American Warwar with SpainSpanish American WarSpanish–AmericanSpanish Warwarwar against Spainwar with the United StatesCuba1898 disaster
The Spanish–American War (Guerra Hispano-Americana; ) was an armed conflict between Spain and the United States in 1898.wikipedia
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Philippine–American War

Philippine-American WarPhilippine InsurrectionFilipino-American War
That led to U.S. involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
The conflict arose when the First Philippine Republic objected to the terms of the Treaty of Paris under which the United States took possession of the Philippines from Spain, ending the short Spanish–American War.

Cuba

Republic of CubaCubanCUB
Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence.
From the 15th century, it was a colony of Spain until the Spanish–American War of 1898, when Cuba was occupied by the United States and gained nominal independence as a de facto United States protectorate in 1902.

Cuban War of Independence

War of IndependenceCuban IndependenceCuban War for Independence
Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence.
The final three months of the conflict escalated to become the Spanish–American War, with United States forces being deployed in Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippine Islands against Spain.

Philippine Revolution

revolutionPhilippine Revolution of 1896revolutionary
That led to U.S. involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
This was the first military action of the Spanish–American War of 1898.

Battle of San Juan Hill

San Juan HillKettle Hillcharge up San Juan Hill
The invaders obtained the surrender of Santiago de Cuba and Manila despite the good performance of some Spanish infantry units and fierce fighting for positions such as San Juan Hill.
The Battle of San Juan Hill (July 1, 1898), also known as the battle for the San Juan Heights, was a decisive battle of the Spanish–American War.

Battle of Santiago de Cuba

SantiagoBattle of SantiagoSantiago de Cuba
Madrid sued for peace after two Spanish squadrons were sunk in Santiago de Cuba and Manila Bay and a third, more modern, fleet was recalled home to protect the Spanish coasts.
The Battle of Santiago de Cuba was a naval battle that occurred on July 3, 1898, in which the United States Navy decisively defeated Spanish forces, sealing American victory in the Spanish–American War and achieving nominal independence for Cuba from Spanish rule.

Puerto Rico

Puerto RicanCommonwealth of Puerto RicoPuerto Rica
The result was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, negotiated on terms favorable to the U.S. which allowed it temporary control of Cuba and ceded ownership of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippine islands.
In 1898, following the Spanish–American War, the United States acquired Puerto Rico under the terms of the Treaty of Paris.

Treaty of Paris (1898)

Treaty of ParisTreaty of Paris of 18981898 Treaty of Paris
The result was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, negotiated on terms favorable to the U.S. which allowed it temporary control of Cuba and ceded ownership of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippine islands.
The Treaty of Paris of 1898 (Filipino: Kasunduan sa Paris ng 1898; Spanish: Tratado de París (1898)) was a treaty signed by Spain and the United States on December 10, 1898, that ended the Spanish–American War.

Insular Government of the Philippine Islands

Philippine IslandsInsular GovernmentPhilippines
The result was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, negotiated on terms favorable to the U.S. which allowed it temporary control of Cuba and ceded ownership of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippine islands.
The Philippines were acquired by the United States in 1898 as a result of the Spanish–American War.

Guam

Territory of GuamGUGuamanian
The result was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, negotiated on terms favorable to the U.S. which allowed it temporary control of Cuba and ceded ownership of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippine islands.
During the Spanish–American War, the United States captured Guam on June 21, 1898.

Spanish East Indies

SpanishPhilippinesSpanish Philippines
The war led to emergence of U.S. predominance in the Caribbean region, and resulted in U.S. acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions.
As a result of the Spanish–American War in 1898, the Philippines and Guam were occupied by the United States while about 6,000 of the remaining smaller islands were sold to Germany in the German–Spanish Treaty of 1899.

Spanish American wars of independence

wars of independenceindependenceSouth America's successful struggle for independence
The combined problems arising from the Peninsular War (1807–1814), the loss of most of its colonies in the Americas in the early 19th-century Spanish American wars of independence, and three Carlist Wars (1832–1876) marked the low point of Spanish colonialism.
Cuba and Puerto Rico remained under Spanish rule until the Spanish–American War in 1898.

Spanish colonization of the Americas

Spanish conquestSpanishSpanish colonization
The combined problems arising from the Peninsular War (1807–1814), the loss of most of its colonies in the Americas in the early 19th-century Spanish American wars of independence, and three Carlist Wars (1832–1876) marked the low point of Spanish colonialism.
In the early 19th century, the Spanish American wars of independence resulted in the secession and subsequent balkanization of most Spanish colonies in the Americas, except for Cuba and Puerto Rico, which were finally given up in 1898, following the Spanish–American War, together with Guam and the Philippines in the Pacific.

Santiago de Cuba

SantiagoSantiago, CubaSantiago de Cuba, Cuba
The invaders obtained the surrender of Santiago de Cuba and Manila despite the good performance of some Spanish infantry units and fierce fighting for positions such as San Juan Hill.
Near the end of the century, during the Spanish–American War, Santiago was the site of the major defeat of Spanish troops at San Juan Hill on July 1, 1898.

Generation of '98

Generation of 98Generation of 1898Generación del '98
The defeat and loss of the last remnants of the Spanish Empire was a profound shock to Spain's national psyche and provoked a thorough philosophical and artistic reevaluation of Spanish society known as the Generation of '98.
The Generation of '98 (Generación del 98), also called Generation of 1898 (Generación de 1898), was a group of novelists, poets, essayists, and philosophers active in Spain at the time of the Spanish–American War (1898), committed to cultural and aesthetic renewal, and associated with modernism.

United States Military Government in Cuba

CubaProtectorate over CubaFirst Occupation of Cuba
The result was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, negotiated on terms favorable to the U.S. which allowed it temporary control of Cuba and ceded ownership of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippine islands.
The United States Military Government in Cuba (Spanish: Gobierno militar estadounidense en Cuba or Gobierno militar americano en Cuba), was a provisional military government in Cuba that was established in the aftermath of the Spanish–American War in 1898 when Spain ceded Cuba to the United States.

Ten Years' War

La DemajaguaTen Years War1st War of Independence
After the American Civil War and Cuba's Ten Years' War, U.S. businessmen began monopolizing the devalued sugar markets in Cuba.
The final three months of the last conflict escalated with United States involvement, leading to the Spanish–American War.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltPresident Theodore RooseveltRoosevelt
Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan was an especially influential theorist; his ideas were much admired by future 26th President Theodore Roosevelt, as the U.S. rapidly built a powerful naval fleet of steel warships in the 1880s and 1890s.
He served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President William McKinley, but he resigned from that post to lead the Rough Riders during the Spanish–American War, returning a war hero.

Americas

Americathe AmericasAmerican
In 1823, the fifth American President James Monroe (1758–1831, served 1817–1825) enunciated the Monroe Doctrine, which stated that the United States would not tolerate further efforts by European governments to retake or expand their colonial holdings in the Americas or to interfere with the newly independent states in the hemisphere; at the same time, the doctrine stated that the U.S. would respect the status of the existing European colonies.
Decolonization of the Americas began with the American Revolution in the 1770s and largely ended with the Spanish–American War in the late 1890s.

William Randolph Hearst

HearstRandolph HearstWilliam R. Hearst
The eruption of the Cuban revolt, Weyler's measures, and the popular fury these events whipped up proved to be a boon to the newspaper industry in New York City, where Joseph Pulitzer of the New York World and William Randolph Hearst of the New York Journal recognized the potential for great headlines and stories that would sell copies.
He sensationalized Spanish atrocities in Cuba while calling for war in 1898 against Spain.

New York Journal-American

New York JournalNew York AmericanNew York Journal American
The eruption of the Cuban revolt, Weyler's measures, and the popular fury these events whipped up proved to be a boon to the newspaper industry in New York City, where Joseph Pulitzer of the New York World and William Randolph Hearst of the New York Journal recognized the potential for great headlines and stories that would sell copies.
Many believed that as part of this, aside from any nationalistic sentiment, Hearst may have helped to initiate the Spanish–American War of 1898 to increase sales.

Regular Army (United States)

Regular ArmyRegularregulars
In the spring of 1898, the strength of the U.S. Regular Army was just 25,000 men.
From the time of the American Revolution until after the Spanish–American War, state militias and volunteer regiments organized by the states (but thereafter controlled by federal authorities and federal generals in time of war) supported the smaller Regular Army of the United States.

Battle of Manila Bay

Manila Bay1898 annexation1898 Battle of Manila Bay
Madrid sued for peace after two Spanish squadrons were sunk in Santiago de Cuba and Manila Bay and a third, more modern, fleet was recalled home to protect the Spanish coasts. The first battle between American and Spanish forces was at Manila Bay where, on May 1, Commodore George Dewey, commanding the U.S. Navy's Asiatic Squadron aboard, in a matter of hours defeated a Spanish squadron under Admiral Patricio Montojo.
The Battle of Manila Bay (Batalla de Bahía de Manila), also known as the Battle of Cavite, took place on 1 May 1898, during the Spanish–American War.

George Dewey

Admiral DeweyAdmiral George DeweyDewey
The first battle between American and Spanish forces was at Manila Bay where, on May 1, Commodore George Dewey, commanding the U.S. Navy's Asiatic Squadron aboard, in a matter of hours defeated a Spanish squadron under Admiral Patricio Montojo.
He is best known for his victory at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish–American War, with the loss of only a single crewman on the American side.

Henry M. Teller

Henry Moore TellerHenry Teller
On April 19, while Congress was considering joint resolutions supporting Cuban independence, Republican Senator Henry M. Teller of Colorado proposed the Teller Amendment to ensure that the U.S. would not establish permanent control over Cuba after the war.
Among his most prominent achievements was authoring the Teller Amendment which definitively stated that, following the Spanish–American War, the U.S. would not annex Cuba rather that the purpose of their involvement would be to help it gain independence from Spain.