Spanish colonization of the Americas

Spanish conquestSpanishSpanish colonizationSpanish colonialSpanish AmericaSpanish conquest of the AmericasSpanish coloniescolonialSpanish colonial periodAmericas
The overseas expansion under the Crown of Castile was initiated under the royal authority and first accomplished by the Spanish conquistadors.wikipedia
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Spanish Empire

SpanishSpainSpanish colonies
The Americas were invaded and incorporated into the Spanish Empire, with the exception of Brazil, Canada, the north-eastern United States and several other small countries in South America and The Caribbean. Beginning with the 1492 arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Caribbean and continuing control of vast territory for over three centuries, the Spanish Empire would expand across the Caribbean Islands, half of South America, most of Central America and much of North America (including present day Mexico, Florida and the Southwestern and Pacific Coastal regions of the United States).
The Spanish empire in the Americas was formed after conquering indigenous empires and claiming large stretches of land, beginning with Christopher Columbus in the Caribbean Islands.

Caribbean

the CaribbeanWest IndiesWest Indian
Beginning with the 1492 arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Caribbean and continuing control of vast territory for over three centuries, the Spanish Empire would expand across the Caribbean Islands, half of South America, most of Central America and much of North America (including present day Mexico, Florida and the Southwestern and Pacific Coastal regions of the United States).
The region takes its name from that of the Caribs, an ethnic group present in the Lesser Antilles and parts of adjacent South America at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Americas.

Central America

CentralCentral AmericanCentral American Isthmus
Beginning with the 1492 arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Caribbean and continuing control of vast territory for over three centuries, the Spanish Empire would expand across the Caribbean Islands, half of South America, most of Central America and much of North America (including present day Mexico, Florida and the Southwestern and Pacific Coastal regions of the United States).
Following the Spanish expedition of Christopher Columbus' voyages to the Americas, Spain began to colonize the Americas.

Hispanic

HispanicsHispanic cultureHispano
Racial mixing was a central process in the Spanish colonization of the Americas, and ultimately led to the Latin American identity, which combines Hispanic, and Native American cultures.
It commonly applies to the people of countries once under colonial possession by the Spanish Empire following Spanish colonization of the Americas, parts of the Asia-Pacific region and Africa.

Columbian exchange

The Grand Exchangeintroducedoccurred with the discovery of the New World
This has been argued to be the first large-scale act of genocide in the modern era, although this claim is disputed due to the introduction of disease, which is considered a byproduct of the Columbian exchange.
16th-century Spanish colonizers introduced new staple crops to Asia from the Americas, including maize and sweet potatoes, and thereby contributed to population growth in Asia.

Cuba

Republic of CubaCubanCUB
In the early 19th century, the Spanish American wars of independence resulted in the secession and subsequent balkanization of most Spanish colonies in the Americas, except for Cuba and Puerto Rico, which were finally given up in 1898, following the Spanish–American War, together with Guam and the Philippines in the Pacific.
The territory that is now Cuba was inhabited by the Ciboney Taíno people from the 4th millennium BC until Spanish colonization in the 15th century.

Spanish–American War

Spanish-American Warwar with SpainSpanish American War
In the early 19th century, the Spanish American wars of independence resulted in the secession and subsequent balkanization of most Spanish colonies in the Americas, except for Cuba and Puerto Rico, which were finally given up in 1898, following the Spanish–American War, together with Guam and the Philippines in the Pacific.
The combined problems arising from the Peninsular War (1807–1814), the loss of most of its colonies in the Americas in the early 19th-century Spanish American wars of independence, and three Carlist Wars (1832–1876) marked the low point of Spanish colonialism.

Guajira Peninsula

Península GoajiraMiss Península GoajiraGuajira
In 1500 the city of Nueva Cádiz was founded on the island of Cubagua, Venezuela, followed by the founding of Santa Cruz by Alonso de Ojeda in present-day Guajira peninsula.
Guajira Peninsula (Peninsula de La Guajira, also spelled Goajira, mainly in colonial period texts), is a peninsula in northern Colombia and northwestern Venezuela in the Caribbean.

Venezuela

VenezuelanBolivarian Republic of VenezuelaVEN
In 1500 the city of Nueva Cádiz was founded on the island of Cubagua, Venezuela, followed by the founding of Santa Cruz by Alonso de Ojeda in present-day Guajira peninsula.
The territory now known as Venezuela was colonized by Spain in 1522 amid resistance from indigenous peoples.

Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire

Spanish conquestSpanish conquest of MexicoConquest
The Spanish conquest of Mexico is generally understood to be the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire (1519–21) which was the base for later conquests of other regions.
The Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, also known as the Spanish–Mexican War (1519–21), was one of the primary events in the Spanish colonization of the Americas.

Spanish conquest of Guatemala

Spanish conquestconquest of GuatemalaGuatemala
The Spanish conquest of Yucatán, the Spanish conquest of Guatemala, the war of Mexico's west, and the Chichimeca War in northern Mexico expanded Spanish control over territory and indigenous populations.
The Spanish conquest of Guatemala was a protracted conflict during the Spanish colonization of the Americas, in which Spanish colonisers gradually incorporated the territory that became the modern country of Guatemala into the colonial Viceroyalty of New Spain.

Spanish conquest of Peru

Spanish conquest of the Inca EmpireSpanish conquestconquest of Peru
But not until the Spanish conquest of Peru was the conquest of the Aztecs matched in scope by the victory over the Inca empire in 1532.
The Spanish conquest of Peru was one of the most important campaigns in the Spanish colonization of the Americas.

Spanish conquest of Yucatán

conquestconquest of YucatánSpanish conquest
The Spanish conquest of Yucatán, the Spanish conquest of Guatemala, the war of Mexico's west, and the Chichimeca War in northern Mexico expanded Spanish control over territory and indigenous populations.
The Spanish conquest of the Yucatán Peninsula was hindered by its politically fragmented state.

Hernán Cortés

CortésHernan CortesCortez
The Spanish conquest of the Aztec empire was led by Hernán Cortés.
Cortés was part of the generation of Spanish colonizers who began the first phase of the Spanish colonization of the Americas.

Santa María la Antigua del Darién

DariénDarienAntigua del Darién
There is indirect evidence that the first permanent Spanish mainland settlement established in the Americas was Santa María la Antigua del Darién.
Santa María la Antigua del Darién, formerly also known as Dariena, was a Spanish colonial town founded in 1510 by Vasco Núñez de Balboa, located in present-day Colombia approximately 40 mi south of Acandí, within the municipality of Unguía in the Chocó Department.

Spanish missions in California

California missionsmissionsSpanish missions
Spain colonized and exerted control of Alta California through the Spanish missions in California until the Mexican secularization act of 1833.
Founded by Catholic priests of the Franciscan order to evangelize the Native Americans, the missions led to the creation of the New Spain province of Alta California and were part of the expansion of the Spanish Empire into the most northern and western parts of Spanish North America.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Americas were invaded and incorporated into the Spanish Empire, with the exception of Brazil, Canada, the north-eastern United States and several other small countries in South America and The Caribbean. Beginning with the 1492 arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Caribbean and continuing control of vast territory for over three centuries, the Spanish Empire would expand across the Caribbean Islands, half of South America, most of Central America and much of North America (including present day Mexico, Florida and the Southwestern and Pacific Coastal regions of the United States).
Roman Catholicism in the United States has its origin primarily in the Spanish and French colonization of the Americas, as well as in the English colony of Maryland.

Nueva Cádiz

Nueva Cadiz
In 1500 the city of Nueva Cádiz was founded on the island of Cubagua, Venezuela, followed by the founding of Santa Cruz by Alonso de Ojeda in present-day Guajira peninsula.
it was one of the first settlements in the Americas.

Crown of Castile

CastileCastilianCrown of Castille
The overseas expansion under the Crown of Castile was initiated under the royal authority and first accomplished by the Spanish conquistadors. The Catholic Monarchs Isabella of Castile, Queen of Castile and her husband King Ferdinand, King of Aragon, pursued a policy of joint rule of their kingdoms and created a single Spanish monarchy.
Also in 1492, the Christopher Columbus maritime expedition claimed the newly found lands in the Americas for the Crown of Castile and began the New World conquests.

Aztecs

AztecAztec EmpireMexica
These polities allied against the Aztec empire, to which they paid tribute following conquest or threat of conquest, leaving the city-states' political hierarchy and social structure in place.
From there they proceeded with the process of conquest and incorporation of Mesoamerican peoples into the Spanish Empire.

Isabella I of Castile

IsabellaQueen IsabellaIsabella I
The Catholic Monarchs Isabella of Castile, Queen of Castile and her husband King Ferdinand, King of Aragon, pursued a policy of joint rule of their kingdoms and created a single Spanish monarchy.
Spain entered a Golden Age of exploration and colonisation, the period of the Spanish Empire.

Juan de Garay

A second (and permanent) settlement was established in 1580 by Juan de Garay, who arrived by sailing down the Paraná River from Asunción (now the capital of Paraguay).
Juan de Garay (1528–1583) was a Spanish conquistador.

Muisca Confederation

confederationMuiscaprehistorical
Between 1537 and 1543, six Spanish expeditions entered highland Colombia, conquered the Muisca Confederation, and set up the New Kingdom of Granada (Nuevo Reino de Granada).
The Muisca Confederation was a loose confederation of different Muisca rulers (zaques, zipas, iraca and tundama) in the central Andean highlands of present-day Colombia before the Spanish conquest of northern South America.

Conquistador

conquistadorsconquistadoresSpanish conquistadors
The overseas expansion under the Crown of Castile was initiated under the royal authority and first accomplished by the Spanish conquistadors.
Campaigns were sometimes initiated by inexperienced governors, because in Spanish Colonial America, offices were bought or handed to relatives or cronies.

Paraguay

ParaguayanRepublic of ParaguayEstablished
A second (and permanent) settlement was established in 1580 by Juan de Garay, who arrived by sailing down the Paraná River from Asunción (now the capital of Paraguay). Buenos Aires, a permanent colony, was established in 1536 and in 1537 Asunción was established in the area that is now Paraguay.
The city eventually became the center of a Spanish colonial province of Paraguay.