Spanish conquest of Guatemala

Spanish conquestconquest of GuatemalaGuatemalaSpanish invasioncolonialconquer GuatemalaSpanish colonistsSpanish conquest of the regionSpanish invasion of Guatemalaconquered by the Spanish
The Spanish conquest of Guatemala was a protracted conflict during the Spanish colonization of the Americas, in which Spanish colonisers gradually incorporated the territory that became the modern country of Guatemala into the colonial Viceroyalty of New Spain.wikipedia
332 Related Articles

Guatemala

🇬🇹GuatemalanRepublic of Guatemala
The Spanish conquest of Guatemala was a protracted conflict during the Spanish colonization of the Americas, in which Spanish colonisers gradually incorporated the territory that became the modern country of Guatemala into the colonial Viceroyalty of New Spain.
Most of the country was conquered by the Spanish in the 16th century, becoming part of the viceroyalty of New Spain.

Lienzo de Quauhquechollan

Quauhquechollan Cloth
Two pictorial accounts painted in the stylised indigenous pictographic tradition have survived; these are the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan, which was probably painted in Ciudad Vieja in the 1530s, and the Lienzo de Tlaxcala, painted in Tlaxcala.
It is one of two surviving Nahua pictorial records recounting the Spanish conquest of Guatemala and one of the earliest surviving maps of what is now Guatemala.

Spanish colonization of the Americas

SpanishSpanish conquestSpanish colonization
The Spanish conquest of Guatemala was a protracted conflict during the Spanish colonization of the Americas, in which Spanish colonisers gradually incorporated the territory that became the modern country of Guatemala into the colonial Viceroyalty of New Spain.
The Spanish conquest of Yucatán, the Spanish conquest of Guatemala, the war of Mexico's west, and the Chichimeca War in northern Mexico expanded Spanish control over territory and indigenous populations.

Conquistador

conquistadorsconquistadoresSpanish conquistadors
Many conquistadors viewed the Maya as "infidels" who needed to be forcefully converted and pacified, disregarding the achievements of their civilization.
Dávila sent Gil González Dávila to explore northward, and Pedro de Alvarado to explore Guatemala.

Santiago de los Caballeros de Guatemala

Ciudad de Santiago de los Caballeros de Goathemalan
Gonzalo de Alvarado y Chávez was Pedro de Alvarado's cousin; he accompanied him on his first campaign in Guatemala and in 1525 he became the chief constable of Santiago de los Caballeros de Guatemala, the newly founded Spanish capital.
The name was first associated with the Kaqchikel Maya capital Iximche, adopted as the Spanish capital soon after the Spanish conquest of Guatemala began in July 1524.

Pedro de Alvarado

AlvaradoPedro of AlvaradoPedro
Pedro de Alvarado arrived in Guatemala from the newly conquered Mexico in early 1524, commanding a mixed force of Spanish conquistadors and native allies, mostly from Tlaxcala and Cholula.
Cortés despatched Pedro de Alvarado to invade Guatemala with 180 cavalry, 300 infantry, crossbows, muskets, 4 cannons, large amounts of ammunition and gunpowder, and thousands of allied Mexican warriors.

Domingo de Vico

Domingo de Vico was a Spanish Dominican friar during the Spanish conquest of Chiapas and the conquest of Guatemala in the 16th century.

Q'umarkaj

AtalayaK'umarcaajPismachi
After the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan fell to the Spanish in 1521, the Kaqchikel Maya of Iximche sent envoys to Hernán Cortés to declare their allegiance to the new ruler of Mexico, and the K'iche' Maya of Q'umarkaj may also have sent a delegation.
At the time of the Spanish Conquest, Q'umarkaj was a relatively new capital, with the capital of the K'iche' kingdom having originally been situated at Jakawitz (identified with the archaeological site Chitinamit) and then at Pismachi'. Q'umarkaj was founded during the reign of king Q'uq'umatz ("Feathered Serpent" in K'iche') in the early 15th century, immediately to the north of Pismachi'.

Tlaxcala (Nahua state)

TlaxcalaTlaxcallanTlaxcalteca
Pedro de Alvarado arrived in Guatemala from the newly conquered Mexico in early 1524, commanding a mixed force of Spanish conquistadors and native allies, mostly from Tlaxcala and Cholula.
Tlaxcala also assisted the Spanish in the conquest of Guatemala.

San Marcos Department

San MarcosSan MárcosDepartment of San Marcos
This included the Mam inhabitants of the area now within the modern department of San Marcos.
The Spanish conquest of Guatemalan Highlands occurred in the 1520s, followed by the establishment of the Province of Tecusitlán and Lacandón within the Viceroyalty of New Spain.

El Progreso Department

El ProgresoProgreso
The Spanish colonial corregimiento of San Cristóbal Acasaguastlán was established in 1551 with its seat in the town of that name, now in the eastern portion of the modern department of El Progreso.
The Spanish established themselves in the region by 1551, after the Spanish conquest of Guatemala.

Escuintla

Escuintla, Escuintla Department
The Spanish only stayed briefly in Iximche before continuing through Atitlán, Escuintla and Cuscatlán.
These influences are due to the troops in command of Pedro de Alvarado who invaded the region in 1520.

Kayb'il B'alam

Pedro de Alvarado described how the Mam king Kayb'il B'alam was received with great honour in Q'umarkaj while he was there.
During the time of the Spanish invasion, the Mam population was mainly situated in Xinabahul (now modern-day Huehuetenango).

Mixco Viejo

Mixco Viejo (Jilotepeque Viejo)
In 1525 Pedro de Alvarado sent a small company to conquer Mixco Viejo (Chinautla Viejo), the capital of the Poqomam.
At the time of the Spanish conquest, the Chajoma of Jilotepeque Viejo may have initially allied themselves with the Spanish together with Iximche and have joined in the general Kaqchikel uprising against the Spanish in 1524.

Francisco Antonio de Fuentes y Guzmán

de Fuentes y Guzmán, Francisco Antonio
Francisco Antonio de Fuentes y Guzmán was a colonial Guatemalan historian of Spanish descent who wrote La Recordación Florida, also called Historia de Guatemala (History of Guatemala). The book was written in 1690 and is regarded as one of the most important works of Guatemalan history, and is the first such book to have been written by a criollo author.
In the book, he describes the customs and rites of indigenous people, the Spanish conquest of Guatemala, and notable facts in the history of Guatemala until the 17th century.

Salcajá

Tzakahá
The day after the battle of Olintepeque, the Spanish army arrived at Tzakahá, which submitted peacefully.
Salcajá is best known for the Church of San Jacinto, founded in 1524, which was the first church built in Central America since it was one of the first places invaded in the Spanish conquest of Guatemala.

Martín de Ursúa

Martín de Urzúa y ArizmendiMartín de Ursúa y ArizmendiMartín de Ursúa y Arismendi
The Itza Maya and other lowland groups in the Petén Basin were first contacted by Hernán Cortés in 1525, but remained independent and hostile to the encroaching Spanish until 1697, when a concerted Spanish assault led by Martín de Ursúa y Arizmendi finally defeated the last independent Maya kingdom.
Spanish conquest of Guatemala

Yalain

Other groups are less well known and their precise territorial extent and political makeup remains obscure; among them were the Chinamita, the Kejache, the Icaiche, the Lakandon Ch'ol, the Mopan, the Manche Ch'ol and the Yalain.
The Yalain polity was under Itza control when the Spanish invaded Petén in 1697, at which time it was ruled by Aj Chan, the son of the sister of the king of the Itza.

Pedro de Portocarrero (conquistador)

Pedro de Portocarrero
Pedro de Portocarrero was a nobleman who joined the initial invasion.
Shortly after the initial Spanish invasion of Guatemala, Alvarado granted Portocarrero the extensive encomienda of Sacatepéquez and Ostuncalco, the largest and most valuable encomienda in Guatemala, which incorporated the entire southern Mam Maya region.

Jacaltenango

Nuestra Señora de la Purificación de Jacaltenango
In 1529 the Chuj city of San Mateo Ixtatán (then known by the name of Ystapalapán) was given in encomienda to the conquistador Gonzalo de Ovalle, a companion of Pedro de Alvarado, together with Santa Eulalia and Jacaltenango.
After the Spanish conquest of Guatemala in the 1520s, the "Presentación de Guatemala" Mercedarian province was formed in 1565; originally, the order of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mercy had gotten from bishop Francisco Marroquín several doctrines in the Sacatepéquez and Chimaltenango valleys, close to the capital Santiago de los Caballeros de Guatemala, but they traded those with friars of the Order of Preachers in exchange for the doctrines those had in the Sierra de los Cuchumatanes area.

Tecpán Guatemala

TecpánTecpán AtitlánTecpan
The Spanish founded a new town at nearby Tecpán Guatemala; Tecpán is Nahuatl for "palace", thus the name of the new town translated as "the palace among the trees".
The fort was built here due to the difficulty that the Spanish had in defeating the Kaqchikel Maya during the Spanish conquest of Guatemala.

San Pedro Soloma

San Pedro de SolomáSoloma
Further Q'anjob'al reducciones were in place at San Pedro Soloma, San Juan Ixcoy and San Miguel Acatán by 1560.
After the Spanish conquest of Guatemala in the 1520s, the "Presentación de Guatemala" Mercedarian province was formed in 1565; originally, the order of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mercy had gotten from bishop Francisco Marroquín several doctrines in the Sacatepéquez and Chimaltenango valleys, close to the capital Santiago de los Caballeros de Guatemala, but they traded those with the Order of Preachers friars in exchange for the doctrines those had in the Sierra de los Cuchumatanes area.

San Mateo Ixtatán

In 1529 the Chuj city of San Mateo Ixtatán (then known by the name of Ystapalapán) was given in encomienda to the conquistador Gonzalo de Ovalle, a companion of Pedro de Alvarado, together with Santa Eulalia and Jacaltenango.
In 1529, four years after the Spanish conquest of Huehuetenango, San Mateo Ixtatán (then known by the name of Ystapalapán) was given in encomienda to the conquistador Gonzalo de Ovalle, a companion of Pedro de Alvarado, together with Santa Eulalia and Jacaltenango.

Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire

Spanish conquestConquestconquest of Mexico
Pedro de Alvarado arrived in Guatemala from the newly conquered Mexico in early 1524, commanding a mixed force of Spanish conquistadors and native allies, mostly from Tlaxcala and Cholula.
1525–30*Spanish conquest of Guatemala

San Cristóbal Acasaguastlán

The Spanish colonial corregimiento of San Cristóbal Acasaguastlán was established in 1551 with its seat in the town of that name, now in the eastern portion of the modern department of El Progreso.
At the time of the Spanish conquest the town of San Cristobal was founded, driving the aboriginal peoples from their town to scattered settlements in the mountains.