A report on Special effect

A special effect of a miniature person from the 1952 film The Seven Deadly Sins
Publicity still for the 1933 film King Kong, which used stop-motion model special effects
A period drama set in Vienna uses a green screen as a backdrop, to allow a background to be added during post-production.
Bluescreens are commonly used in chroma key special effects.
Spinning fiery steel wool at night
Rig & Gimbal Mechanical Special Effects
Demonstration of bullet hit squibs embedded in a waterproof down jacket as the dead-character costume bursting out fake blood and smoke.

Special effects (often abbreviated as SFX, F/X or simply FX) are illusions or visual tricks used in the theatre, film, television, video game, amusement park and simulator industries to simulate the imagined events in a story or virtual world.

- Special effect
A special effect of a miniature person from the 1952 film The Seven Deadly Sins

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2001: A Space Odyssey, the landmark 1968 collaboration between filmmaker Stanley Kubrick and classic science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke, featured groundbreaking special effects, such as the realization of the spaceship 
USSC Discovery One (pictured here).

Science fiction film

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Film genre that uses speculative, fictional science-based depictions of phenomena that are not fully accepted by mainstream science, such as extraterrestrial lifeforms, spacecraft, robots, cyborgs, interstellar travel or other technologies.

Film genre that uses speculative, fictional science-based depictions of phenomena that are not fully accepted by mainstream science, such as extraterrestrial lifeforms, spacecraft, robots, cyborgs, interstellar travel or other technologies.

2001: A Space Odyssey, the landmark 1968 collaboration between filmmaker Stanley Kubrick and classic science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke, featured groundbreaking special effects, such as the realization of the spaceship 
USSC Discovery One (pictured here).
Metropolis (1927) by Fritz Lang was one of the first feature length science fiction films. It was produced at Studio Babelsberg, Germany. (Photo shows the statue depicting the Machinenmensch before it is given Maria's soul, at Filmpark Babelsberg).
Peter Sellers as the titular character from Dr. Strangelove (1964)
Transformers characters at Universal Studios Hollywood

The genre has existed since the early years of silent cinema, when Georges Melies' A Trip to the Moon (1902) employed trick photography effects.

Theatrical release poster

King Kong (1933 film)

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1933 American pre-Code adventure fantasy horror monster film directed and produced by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack.

1933 American pre-Code adventure fantasy horror monster film directed and produced by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack.

Theatrical release poster
Fay Wray – Studio Publicity Photo
Armstrong featured in the trailer for The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936)
Charles R. Knight's Tyrannosaurus in the American Museum of Natural History, on which the large theropod of the film was based
The stop-motion animated King Kong atop the Empire State Building and battling a Curtiss F8C Helldiver airplane
A gorilla at Jersey Zoo displaying prominent belly and buttocks. Kong modelers would streamline the armature's torso to minimize the comical and awkward aspects of the gorilla's physique.
An articulated skeleton of the Brontosaurus used in the film.
Promotional image featuring Kong battling the Tyrannosaurus.
Colored publicity shot combining live actors with stop motion animation.
King Kong views Ann on the limb of a tree
Grauman's Chinese Theatre, where King Kong held its world premiere

At the turn of the 20th century, the Lumière Brothers sent film documentarians to places westerners had never seen, and Georges Méliès utilized trick photography in film fantasies that prefigured that in King Kong.

Harryhausen at the Jules Verne Festival in October 2006

Ray Harryhausen

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Harryhausen at the Jules Verne Festival in October 2006
The Ymir from 20 Million Miles to Earth (1957)
The Cyclops and Dragon battle sequence from The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958)
The Hydra battle sequence in Jason and the Argonauts (1963)
Models for the Allosaur in One Million Years B.C. (1966) and Talos from Jason and the Argonauts (1963) at the National Media Museum

Raymond Frederick Harryhausen (June 29, 1920 – May 7, 2013) was an American-British animator and special effects creator who created a form of stop motion model animation known as "Dynamation".

Godzilla in 1954's Godzilla. The techniques developed by Eiji Tsuburaya for Toho Studios continue to be used in the tokusatsu film and television industry.

Tokusatsu

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Godzilla in 1954's Godzilla. The techniques developed by Eiji Tsuburaya for Toho Studios continue to be used in the tokusatsu film and television industry.
Protagonists of the popular tokusatsu franchises mostly of the late 1970s (from back to front, left to right): Ultraman Joneus (Ultra Series), Battle Fever J (Super Sentai), Kamen Rider Stronger and Kamen Rider V3 (Kamen Rider Series), and Spider-Man. The photo also features anime character Doraemon on the far left.

Tokusatsu (特撮) is a Japanese term for live action film or television drama that makes heavy use of practical special effects.

Nr. 10 in the reworked second series of Stampfer's stroboscopic discs published by Trentsensky & Vieweg in 1833.

Animation

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Method in which figures are manipulated to appear as moving images.

Method in which figures are manipulated to appear as moving images.

Nr. 10 in the reworked second series of Stampfer's stroboscopic discs published by Trentsensky & Vieweg in 1833.
A projecting praxinoscope, from 1882, here shown superimposing an animated figure on a separately projected background scene
Fantasmagorie (1908) by Émile Cohl
Italian-Argentine cartoonist Quirino Cristiani showing the cut and articulated figure of his satirical character El Peludo (based on President Yrigoyen) patented in 1916 for the realization of his films, including the world's first animated feature film El Apóstol.
An example of traditional animation, a horse animated by rotoscoping from Eadweard Muybridge's 19th-century photos.
A clay animation scene from a Finnish television commercial
A 2D animation of two circles joined by a chain
World of Color hydrotechnics at Disney California Adventure creates the illusion of motion using 1,200 fountains with high-definition projections on mist screens.

Go motion : A variant of model animation that uses various techniques to create motion blur between frames of film, which is not present in traditional stop motion. The technique was invented by Industrial Light & Magic and Phil Tippett to create special effect scenes for the film The Empire Strikes Back (1980). Another example is the dragon named "Vermithrax" from the 1981 film Dragonslayer.

A location shot for The Black Dahlia with a rainmaking rig, a sprinkler system used to create the appearance of rain—a common practical effect

Practical effect

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A location shot for The Black Dahlia with a rainmaking rig, a sprinkler system used to create the appearance of rain—a common practical effect
Demonstration of bullet hit squibs embedded in a waterproof down jacket as the dead-character costume bursting out fake blood and smoke.

A practical effect is a special effect produced physically, without computer-generated imagery or other post-production techniques.

Matte (filmmaking)

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Mattes are used in photography and special effects filmmaking to combine two or more image elements into a single, final image.

The Man with the Rubber Head

Visual effects

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Process by which imagery is created or manipulated outside the context of a live-action shot in filmmaking and video production.

Process by which imagery is created or manipulated outside the context of a live-action shot in filmmaking and video production.

The Man with the Rubber Head
A period drama set in Vienna uses a green screen as a backdrop, to allow a background to be added during post-production.
Motion Capture: A high-resolution uniquely identified active marker system with 3,600 × 3,600 resolution at 960 hertz providing real time submillimeter positions
Composite of photos of one place, made more than a century apart

Special Effects: Special effects (often abbreviated as SFX, SPFX, F/X or simply FX) are illusions or visual tricks used in the theatre, film, television, video game and simulator industries to simulate the imagined events in a story or virtual world. Special effects are traditionally divided into the categories of mechanical effects and optical effects. With the emergence of digital film-making a distinction between special effects and visual effects has grown, with the latter referring to digital post-production while "special effects" referring to mechanical and optical effects. Mechanical effects (also called practical or physical effects) are usually accomplished during the live-action shooting. This includes the use of mechanized props, scenery, scale models, animatronics, pyrotechnics and atmospheric effects: creating physical wind, rain, fog, snow, clouds, making a car appear to drive by itself and blowing up a building, etc. Mechanical effects are also often incorporated into set design and makeup. For example, prosthetic makeup can be used to make an actor look like a non-human creature. Optical-effects (also called photographic-effects) are techniques in which images or film frames are created photographically, either "in-camera" using multiple exposure, mattes or the Schüfftan process or in post-production using an optical printer. An optical effect might be used to place actors or sets against a different background.

A 35 mm optical printer with two projector heads, used in producing movie special effects. Starting from the left, light is shining from the lamp house, then at A is the first projector's film gate, at B a lens that projects the film in A onto the second projector's gate C. At D is the lens of the camera, the camera's finder is at E and the adjustable shutter control at F. The heavy base G contains all the electronics needed for controlling the printer.

Optical printer

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Device consisting of one or more film projectors mechanically linked to a movie camera.

Device consisting of one or more film projectors mechanically linked to a movie camera.

A 35 mm optical printer with two projector heads, used in producing movie special effects. Starting from the left, light is shining from the lamp house, then at A is the first projector's film gate, at B a lens that projects the film in A onto the second projector's gate C. At D is the lens of the camera, the camera's finder is at E and the adjustable shutter control at F. The heavy base G contains all the electronics needed for controlling the printer.
Inexpensive J-K 16 mm optical printer using a Bolex camera.

The optical printer is used for making special effects for motion pictures, or for copying and restoring old film material.

Tsuburaya on the set of The Three Treasures.

Eiji Tsuburaya

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Tsuburaya on the set of The Three Treasures.
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Eiji Tsuburaya (円谷 英二) was a Japanese special effects director.