Spelling alphabet

phonetic alphabetradio alphabetSpelling alphabetsBRAVO YANKEE BRAVO YANKEEGerman spelling alphabetNATO alphabetphoneticphonetic codephoneticallypre-NATO US phonetic alphabet
A spelling alphabet, word-spelling alphabet, voice procedure alphabet, radio alphabet, or telephone alphabet is a set of words used to stand for the letters of an alphabet in oral communication.wikipedia
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Anti-aircraft warfare

anti-aircraftanti-aircraft gunair defense
Recorded in the 1898 "Signalling Instruction" issued by the War Office and followed by the 1904 Signalling Regulations this system differentiated only the letters most frequently misunderstood: Ack (originally "Ak") Beer (or Bar) C D E F G H I J K L eMma N O Pip Q R eSses Toc U Vic W X Y Z. This alphabet was the origin of phrases such as "ack-ack" (A.A. for anti-aircraft), "pip-emma" for pm and Toc H for an ex-servicemen association.
Nicknames for anti-aircraft guns include AA, AAA or triple-A, an abbreviation of anti-aircraft artillery; "ack-ack" (from the spelling alphabet used by the British for voice transmission of "AA"); and archie (a World War I British term probably coined by Amyas Borton, and believed to derive via the Royal Flying Corps, from the music-hall comedian George Robey's line "Archibald, certainly not!"

Toc H

Toc H'' foundationTalbot HouseTocH
Recorded in the 1898 "Signalling Instruction" issued by the War Office and followed by the 1904 Signalling Regulations this system differentiated only the letters most frequently misunderstood: Ack (originally "Ak") Beer (or Bar) C D E F G H I J K L eMma N O Pip Q R eSses Toc U Vic W X Y Z. This alphabet was the origin of phrases such as "ack-ack" (A.A. for anti-aircraft), "pip-emma" for pm and Toc H for an ex-servicemen association.
The name is an abbreviation for Talbot House, 'Toc' signifying the letter T in the signals spelling alphabet used by the British Army in World War I. A soldiers' rest and recreation centre named Talbot House was founded in December 1915 at Poperinghe, Belgium.

NATO phonetic alphabet

phonetic alphabetICAO spelling alphabetNATO alphabet
In the international radiotelephony spelling alphabet known as the ICAO (or NATO) phonetic alphabet, the sequence J–A–K would be pronounced Juliet–Alfa–Kilo.
The NATO phonetic alphabet is the most widely used radiotelephone spelling alphabet.

English alphabet

modern English alphabetEnglishalphabet
Prior to spelling alphabets, the words used to indicate English letters were "a", "bee", "cee", "dee", "e", etc. Their spoken sounds are difficult to discriminate, particularly over a limited-bandwidth and noisy communications channel, hence the use by armed services of unambiguous phonetic alphabets for electrical voice communication (telephone and radio, but not telegraph).
Spelling alphabets such as the ICAO spelling alphabet, used by aircraft pilots, police and others, are designed to eliminate this potential confusion by giving each letter a name that sounds quite different from any other.

Greek spelling alphabet

The Greek spelling alphabet is a spelling alphabet for the Greek language, i.e. a set of names used in lieu of alphabet letters for the purpose of spelling out words.
The Greek spelling alphabet is a spelling alphabet (or "phonetic alphabet") for Greek, i.e. a set of names given to the alphabet letters for the purpose of spelling out words.

Russian spelling alphabet

Zhenya, Ulyana, Olga, Zinaida
The Russian spelling alphabet is a spelling alphabet for the Russian version of the Cyrillic alphabet.
The Russian spelling alphabet is a spelling alphabet (or "phonetic alphabet") for Russian, i.e. a set of names given to the alphabet letters for the purpose of spelling out words.

Acrophony

acrophonicacrophonicallyacrophonic numeral systems
Each word in the spelling alphabet typically replaces the name of the letter with which it starts (acrophony).
Modern radiotelephony and aviation uses spelling alphabets (the best-known of which is the NATO Phonetic Alphabet, which begins with Alfa, Bravo, Charlie, Delta...) in which the letters of the English alphabet are arbitrarily assigned words and names in an acrophonic manner to avoid misunderstanding.

Allied military phonetic spelling alphabets

Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabetphonetic alphabetRAF phonetic alphabet
The RAF developed their "Telephony Spelling Alphabet", which was adopted by all three services and civil aviation in the UK from 1921.

APCO radiotelephony spelling alphabet

LAPD phonetic alphabetAPCO phonetic alphabet
See https://www.apcointl.org and APCO radiotelephony spelling alphabet.
The APCO phonetic alphabet, a.k.a. LAPD radio alphabet, is the term for an old competing spelling alphabet to the ICAO radiotelephony alphabet, defined by the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials-International from 1941 to 1974, that is used by the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) and other local and state law enforcement agencies across the state of California and elsewhere in the United States.

German orthography

German alphabetGermanGerman spelling
The German spelling alphabet ("Deutsches Funkalphabet" (literally "German Radio Alphabet")) also uses first names.
# In the spelling alphabet, for, Charlotte is used.

Finnish Armed Forces radio alphabet

Finnish armed forces' radio alphabetFinnish radio alphabet
These code words are used only in national operations, the last remnants of the Finnish radio alphabet.

Japanese radiotelephony alphabet

Phonetic alphabetJapanese phonetic alphabet
The Japanese radiotelephony alphabet is a radiotelephony spelling alphabet, similar in purpose to the NATO/ICAO radiotelephony alphabet, but designed to communicate the Japanese kana syllables rather than Latin letters.

Swedish Armed Forces radio alphabet

Swedish Armed Forces' phonetic alphabetSwedish Armed Forces' radio alphabetSwedish phonetic alphabet
The Swedish Armed Forces' radio alphabet was a radiotelephony alphabet made up of Swedish two-syllable male names with the exception of Z which is just the name of the letter as pronounced in Swedish.

IJ (digraph)

ijIJij digraph
In the Dutch phonetic radio alphabet, the codeword IJmuiden represents the IJ.

Alphabet

alphabeticalphabetsalphabetical
A spelling alphabet, word-spelling alphabet, voice procedure alphabet, radio alphabet, or telephone alphabet is a set of words used to stand for the letters of an alphabet in oral communication.

Telephone

phonetelephonesLocal Telephone Service
The lack of high frequencies on standard telephones makes it hard to distinguish an 'F' from an 'S' for example.

Ticker symbol

stock symboltickersymbol
Spelling out one's name, a password or a ticker symbol over the telephone are other scenarios where a spelling alphabet is useful.

Amateur radio

ham radioamateur radio licenseamateur
A spelling alphabet is also often called a phonetic alphabet, especially by amateur radio enthusiasts, recreational sailors in the US and Australia, and NATO military organizations.

Phonetics

phoneticphoneticallyphonetician
However, this conflicts with the usage of the same phrase in phonetics to mean a notation used for phonetic transcription or phonetic spelling, such as the International Phonetic Alphabet, which is used to indicate the sounds of human speech.

Phonetic transcription

phonetic alphabetbroad transcriptiontranscription
However, this conflicts with the usage of the same phrase in phonetics to mean a notation used for phonetic transcription or phonetic spelling, such as the International Phonetic Alphabet, which is used to indicate the sounds of human speech.

Phonemic orthography

phonetic spellingphonemicphonetic
However, this conflicts with the usage of the same phrase in phonetics to mean a notation used for phonetic transcription or phonetic spelling, such as the International Phonetic Alphabet, which is used to indicate the sounds of human speech.

International Phonetic Alphabet

IPAPronunciationInternational Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
However, this conflicts with the usage of the same phrase in phonetics to mean a notation used for phonetic transcription or phonetic spelling, such as the International Phonetic Alphabet, which is used to indicate the sounds of human speech.

Telegraphy

telegraphtelegramcable
Prior to spelling alphabets, the words used to indicate English letters were "a", "bee", "cee", "dee", "e", etc. Their spoken sounds are difficult to discriminate, particularly over a limited-bandwidth and noisy communications channel, hence the use by armed services of unambiguous phonetic alphabets for electrical voice communication (telephone and radio, but not telegraph).

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
British Army signallers began using a partial spelling alphabet in the late 19th century.

Signaller

signalersignalsRadio Operator
British Army signallers began using a partial spelling alphabet in the late 19th century.