Spider anatomy

pedicelgenitaliaabdomencarapaceepigastric furrowsternumcephalothoraxopisthosomatarsusabdominal
The anatomy of spiders includes many characteristics shared with other arachnids.wikipedia
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Spider

Araneaespidersegg sac
The anatomy of spiders includes many characteristics shared with other arachnids. Spiders, unlike insects, have only two main body parts (tagmata) instead of three: a fused head and thorax (called a cephalothorax or prosoma) and an abdomen (also called an opisthosoma).
Anatomically, spiders differ from other arthropods in that the usual body segments are fused into two tagmata, the cephalothorax and abdomen, and joined by a small, cylindrical pedicel.

Epigyne

epigynumepigynalgenitalia
A fold, known as the epigastric furrow, separates the region of the book lungs and epigyne from the more posterior part of the abdomen.
It consists of a small, hardened portion of the exoskeleton located on the underside of the abdomen, in front of the epigastric furrow and between the epigastric plates.

Pedipalp

palppedipalpspalpi
These characteristics include bodies divided into two tagmata (sections or segments), eight jointed legs, no wings or antennae, the presence of chelicerae and pedipalps, simple eyes, and an exoskeleton, which is periodically shed.
Pedipalps of spiders have the same segmentation as the legs, but the tarsus is undivided, and the pretarsus has no lateral claws.

Glossary of spider terms

foveaapophysiscarapace
* Glossary of spider terms

Arachnid

Arachnidaarachnidsarachnoid
The anatomy of spiders includes many characteristics shared with other arachnids.

Tagma (biology)

tagmatatagmaparts
These characteristics include bodies divided into two tagmata (sections or segments), eight jointed legs, no wings or antennae, the presence of chelicerae and pedipalps, simple eyes, and an exoskeleton, which is periodically shed. Spiders, unlike insects, have only two main body parts (tagmata) instead of three: a fused head and thorax (called a cephalothorax or prosoma) and an abdomen (also called an opisthosoma).

Chelicerae

cheliceracheliceralcheliceral fang
These characteristics include bodies divided into two tagmata (sections or segments), eight jointed legs, no wings or antennae, the presence of chelicerae and pedipalps, simple eyes, and an exoskeleton, which is periodically shed.

Simple eye in invertebrates

ocellisimple eyeseyespot
These characteristics include bodies divided into two tagmata (sections or segments), eight jointed legs, no wings or antennae, the presence of chelicerae and pedipalps, simple eyes, and an exoskeleton, which is periodically shed.

Exoskeleton

shellshellsexoskeletal
These characteristics include bodies divided into two tagmata (sections or segments), eight jointed legs, no wings or antennae, the presence of chelicerae and pedipalps, simple eyes, and an exoskeleton, which is periodically shed. Unlike insects, spiders have an endoskeleton in addition to their exoskeleton.

Ecdysis

moultmoultsmoulting
These characteristics include bodies divided into two tagmata (sections or segments), eight jointed legs, no wings or antennae, the presence of chelicerae and pedipalps, simple eyes, and an exoskeleton, which is periodically shed.

Spider silk

silkgossamersilken
All spiders are capable of producing silk of various types, which many species use to build webs to ensnare prey.

Spider web

webcobwebwebs
All spiders are capable of producing silk of various types, which many species use to build webs to ensnare prey.

Venom

venomousvenomsvenomous animals
Most spiders possess venom, which is injected into prey (or defensively, when the spider feels threatened) through the fangs of the chelicerae.

Sexual dimorphism

sexually dimorphicdimorphicdimorphism
Many species of spiders exhibit a great deal of sexual dimorphism.

Insect

Insectainsectsbugs
Spiders, unlike insects, have only two main body parts (tagmata) instead of three: a fused head and thorax (called a cephalothorax or prosoma) and an abdomen (also called an opisthosoma).

Head

cephalicheadsCephal
Spiders, unlike insects, have only two main body parts (tagmata) instead of three: a fused head and thorax (called a cephalothorax or prosoma) and an abdomen (also called an opisthosoma).

Thorax

chestthoracicthoraces
Spiders, unlike insects, have only two main body parts (tagmata) instead of three: a fused head and thorax (called a cephalothorax or prosoma) and an abdomen (also called an opisthosoma).

Cephalothorax

prosomacephalothoracicfovea
Spiders, unlike insects, have only two main body parts (tagmata) instead of three: a fused head and thorax (called a cephalothorax or prosoma) and an abdomen (also called an opisthosoma).

Abdomen

abdominalabdominal musclesbelly
Spiders, unlike insects, have only two main body parts (tagmata) instead of three: a fused head and thorax (called a cephalothorax or prosoma) and an abdomen (also called an opisthosoma).

Opisthosoma

abdomenabdomensopisthosomal segments
Spiders, unlike insects, have only two main body parts (tagmata) instead of three: a fused head and thorax (called a cephalothorax or prosoma) and an abdomen (also called an opisthosoma).

Archaeidae

assassin spidersMain's assassin spiderarchaeids
The exception to this rule are the assassin spiders in the family Archaeidae, whose cephalothorax is divided into two parts by an elongated "neck".

Liphistiidae

liphistius trapdoor spider
The exception is the Liphistiidae, a basal family, which retains this more primitive character; hence they are sometimes called segmented spiders.

Basal (phylogenetics)

basalbasalmostprimitive
The exception is the Liphistiidae, a basal family, which retains this more primitive character; hence they are sometimes called segmented spiders.

Endoskeleton

endoskeletalinternal skeletoninner skeleton
Unlike insects, spiders have an endoskeleton in addition to their exoskeleton.

Argyrodes

Argyrodes miniaceusdewdrop spider
Some spiders, such as the dewdrop spiders (Argyrodes), even eat the silk of other spider species.