St. Mary's Seminary and University

St. Mary's SeminarySt. Mary's CollegeSt. Mary’s SeminarySt. Mary's College, BaltimoreSaint Mary SeminarySt. Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, MarylandSt. Mary's UniversitySt. Mary’s UniversityEcumenical Institute at St. Mary's SeminarySaint Mary's Seminary
St. Mary's Seminary and University is a Roman Catholic seminary located within the Archdiocese of Baltimore in Baltimore, Maryland; it was the first seminary founded in the United States of America after the Revolution.wikipedia
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Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore

Archbishop of BaltimoreArchdiocese of BaltimoreBaltimore
St. Mary's Seminary and University is a Roman Catholic seminary located within the Archdiocese of Baltimore in Baltimore, Maryland; it was the first seminary founded in the United States of America after the Revolution.
The Archdiocese of Baltimore has two major seminaries: St. Mary's Seminary and University in Baltimore and Mount St. Mary's Seminary in Emmitsburg.

Alphonse Magnien

The influence of the St. Mary's Seminary increased in the late 19th Century under the leadership of Alphonse Magnien, who served as superior of the school from 1878 to 1902.
Alphonse Magnien (June 9, 1837 – December 21, 1902) was the superior at St. Mary's Seminary and University in Baltimore, Maryland from 1878 to 1902.

St. Mary's Seminary Chapel

Chapel, St. Mary Seminary
St. Mary's Seminary Chapel was built.
It was built from 1806 through 1808 by French architect J. Maximilian M. Godefroy for the French Sulpician priests of St. Mary's Seminary.

Michael Levadoux

With him were associated Michael Levadoux as treasurer, MM.
Michael Levadoux (born at Clermont-Ferrand, in Auvergne, France, 1 April 1746; died at Le-Puy-en-Velay, 13 January 1815) was a French Sulpician, one of those who went to the United States and founded St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore, in the aftermath of the French Revolution.

Baltimore

Baltimore, MarylandBaltimore, MDBaltimore City
St. Mary's Seminary and University is a Roman Catholic seminary located within the Archdiocese of Baltimore in Baltimore, Maryland; it was the first seminary founded in the United States of America after the Revolution.
Loyola University Maryland, Johns Hopkins University Homewood Campus, St. Mary's Seminary and University and Notre Dame of Maryland University are located in this district.

Mother Seton House

home
Mother Seton House is an historic home located on the grounds of St. Mary’s Seminary adjacent to the Seminary Chapel.
Mother Seton House is a historic home located on the grounds of St. Mary’s Seminary at Baltimore, Maryland, United States.

Maximilian Godefroy

J. Maximilian M. GodefroyJ. Maximilian GodefroyJ. Maxmilian M. Godefroy
St. Mary's Seminary Chapel, a Neo-Gothic style church designed by French architect J. Maximilian M. Godefroy was built in 1806.
Later, as an anti-Bonaparte activist, he was imprisoned in the fortress of Bellegarde and Chateau D'if then released about 1805 and allowed to come to the United States, settling in Baltimore, Maryland, where he became an instructor in drawing, art and military science at St. Mary's College, the Sulpician Seminary.

Michael J. Gorman

Gorman, Michael, J.Michael Gorman
Dr. Brent Laytham, formerly of North Park University, is the E.I.'s dean, succeeding Dr. Michael J. Gorman.
He is the Raymond E. Brown Professor of Biblical Studies and Theology at St. Mary's Seminary and University.

John Carroll (bishop)

John CarrollBishop John CarrollBishop Carroll
Negotiations were opened with the recently consecrated Bishop John Carroll of Baltimore, Maryland, and after some delay Rev. Francis C. Nagot, S.S., was named first director of the projected seminary.
They arrived in 1791 and started the nucleus of St. Mary's College and Seminary, Baltimore.

Louis William Valentine Dubourg

Louis DubourgLouis Guillaume Valentin DubourgWilliam Dubourg
Around 1806, Elizabeth Ann Seton met Abbé Louis William Valentine Dubourg when he was preaching in New York.
After an unsuccessful trip to Havana where he joined Benedict Joseph Flaget in attempted to open a school, Dubourg returned to Baltimore in August 1799 and became the first President of St. Mary's College, Baltimore, where he remained for thirteen years.

William O. Brady

Archbishop William BradyWilliam BradyWilliam Otterwell Brady
He continued his studies at St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore (1918–20) and at the Theological College of The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. (1920–23).

Benjamin Ignatius Hayes

Benjamin HayesBenjamin I. HayesHayes
Hayes was born on February 14, 1815, in Baltimore, Maryland, and graduated from St. Mary's University in that city.

Raymond E. Brown

Brown, Raymond E.BrownRaymond Brown
In 1951 he joined the scholarly Society of Saint-Sulpice following his reception of a Bachelor in Sacred Theology degree from St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore, Maryland.

Samuel Eccleston

Samuel Eccleston, P.S.S.
Young Samuel Eccleston was sent to St. Mary's College in Baltimore, run by the Sulpician Fathers, to be educated.

Elizabeth Ann Seton

St. Elizabeth Ann SetonSaint Elizabeth Ann SetonElizabeth Seton
Elizabeth Ann Seton, founder of the Sisters of Charity, pronounced vows of chastity and obedience to John Carroll for one year in the lower chapel on Paca Street on March 25, 1809.
Seton was about to move to Canada when she met a visiting priest, the Abbé Louis William Valentine Dubourg, SS, who was a member of the French émigré community of Sulpician Fathers and then president of St. Mary's College, Baltimore.

Society of the Priests of Saint Sulpice

SulpicianSulpiciansSociety of Saint-Sulpice
In consequence of the threatening aspect of affairs in France, Rev. J. A. Emery, Superior-General of the Sulpicians, deemed it prudent to found a house of their institute in some foreign country, and at the suggestion of Cardinal Antonio Dugnani, nuncio at Paris, the United States was chosen.
In July of that year, four Sulpicians, newly arrived from France, established the first Catholic institution for the training of clergy in the newly formed United States: St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore.

John Samuel Foley

Bishop FoleyJohn FoleyMost Rev. Bishop John Samuel Foley
After attending local parochial schools in Baltimore, he completed his studies in the classics and philosophy at St. Mary's College in 1850.

Patrick James Byrne

Patrick Joseph ByrnePatrick ByrneFather Byrne
Born in Washington, D.C., Patrick Byrne was educated by the Sulpicians at St. Charles College in Ellicott City, Maryland, and St. Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore.

James Gibbons

Cardinal GibbonsJames Cardinal GibbonsCardinal James Gibbons
After graduating from St. Charles, he entered St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore in 1857.

Peter Leo Ireton

He studied at St. Charles College in Catonsville and at St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore.

Edward Aloysius Mooney

Edward MooneyEdward Cardinal MooneyCardinal Mooney
He attended St. Charles College in Ellicott City and St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore before being sent to Rome in 1905 to study at the Pontifical North American College.

W. Francis Malooly

William Francis MaloolyWilliam F. MaloolyBishop W. Francis Malooly
William Francis Malooly, who is known better as Francis Malooly or W. Francis Malooly, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, and attended St. Ursula School in Parkville before entering St. Charles College in Catonsville and later St. Mary's Seminary and University in Roland Park.

Roland Park, Baltimore

Roland ParkRoland Park, MarylandRoland Park Company
St. Mary's Seminary and now University moved to a large 40-acre, park-like campus at the southwest intersection of Roland and Belvedere (later Northern Parkway) Avenues in the Roland Park section of northern Baltimore City in 1929, with the construction of its present Beaux ArtsClassical Revival style, central main building, designed by the firm of Maginnis & Walsh of Boston, which is set far back to the west from Roland Avenue across a great grass lawn.
In addition, St. Mary's Seminary and University is located in Roland Park.