St Elphin's Church, Warrington

St Elphin's Churchchurch in Warringtonparish churchpresent parish churchSt ElphinSt. Elphin's Church
St Elphin's Church is the parish church of the town of Warrington, Cheshire, England.wikipedia
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Warrington

Borough of WarringtonWarrington, EnglandWarrington, Cheshire
St Elphin's Church is the parish church of the town of Warrington, Cheshire, England.
The origin of the modern town was located in the area around St Elphin's Church, now included in the Church Street Conservation Area, established whilst the main river crossing was via a ford approximately 1 km upriver of Warrington Bridge.

Saint Elphin

Elphin
According to tradition the first church was built by Saint Oswald for his companion Elphin, who remained as the first priest there until his death in 679.
When Oswald became King of Northumbria and moved his country residence to Makerfield, Elphin accompanied him and Oswald built a wooden church for him on the site of the present parish church in Warrington.

Church Street, Warrington

Church StreetChurch Street (Warrington)
The church and its grounds lie within the Church Street Conservation area.
Church Street is one of the main thoroughfares of Warrington in Cheshire, England, linking the modern town centre to St Elphin's Church, to the east.

St Elphin's School

St Elphin's Boarding SchoolSt Elphin's girls' boarding school
The school opened on 15 March 1844 in Warrington, dedicated to Saint Elphin who according to tradition founded the nearby parish church.

Parish church

parishchurchparochial church
St Elphin's Church is the parish church of the town of Warrington, Cheshire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Liverpool, the archdeaconry of Warrington and the deanery of Warrington.

Cheshire

Cheshire, EnglandCounty Palatine of ChesterCounty of Chester
St Elphin's Church is the parish church of the town of Warrington, Cheshire, England.

National Heritage List for England

National Heritage ListThe National Heritage List for EnglandEnglish Heritage Register
The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

Listed building

Grade II listedlistedGrade II* listed
The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

Anglicanism

AnglicanAnglican ChurchAnglicans
It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Liverpool, the archdeaconry of Warrington and the deanery of Warrington.

Anglican Diocese of Liverpool

diocese of LiverpoolLiverpoolLiverpool Diocese
It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Liverpool, the archdeaconry of Warrington and the deanery of Warrington.

Domesday Book

Domesday SurveyDomesdayDoomsday Book
A place of worship has been present on the site since about 650 AD, and the presence of a priest in Warrington was recorded in the Domesday Book.

Oswald of Northumbria

OswaldSaint OswaldSt Oswald
According to tradition the first church was built by Saint Oswald for his companion Elphin, who remained as the first priest there until his death in 679.

Chancel

presbyterychancel archsanctuary
The earliest fabric in the present church is in the chancel and the crypt, which survive from the church built in 1354 by Sir William Boteler.

Roundhead

ParliamentarianParliamentariansParliamentary
The church was badly damaged by the Parliamentary forces in the Civil War.

English Civil War

Civil WarCivil WarsEnglish Revolution
The church was badly damaged by the Parliamentary forces in the Civil War.

Nave

navessingle-navesanctuary
Following this the tower was rebuilt in 1696 and the nave in 1770.

Aisle

aislesside aisleaisled
The south aisle was added in the early 19th century.

Victorian restoration

restoredrestorationheavily restored
Most of the fabric of the present church is the result of an extensive restoration between 1859 and 1867 by Frederick and Horace Francis.

Burial vault (tomb)

burial vaultvaultfamily vault
The chapel was then acquired by the Patten family who built a vault to bury members of the family, the last being Lord Winmarleigh in 1892.

John Wilson-Patten, 1st Baron Winmarleigh

John Wilson-PattenLord WinmarleighBaron Winmarleigh
The chapel was then acquired by the Patten family who built a vault to bury members of the family, the last being Lord Winmarleigh in 1892.

South Lancashire Regiment

Prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire Regiment)The South Lancashire RegimentThe South Lancashire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's Volunteers)
In 1943 it became the chapel of the South Lancashire Regiment and in 1976 the chapel of the Queen's Lancashire Regiment.