St Pancras railway station

London St PancrasSt PancrasSt Pancras InternationalSt Pancras StationLondon St Pancras InternationalSt. Pancras StationSt. PancrasLondon St. PancrasLondonSt. Pancras International
St Pancras railway station, also known as London St Pancras and officially since 2007 as St Pancras International, is a central London railway terminus on Euston Road in the London Borough of Camden.wikipedia
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Pancras of Rome

Saint PancrasPancrasSt. Pancras
The station's name comes from the St. Pancras neighbourhood, which originates from the fourth-century Christian boy martyr Pancras of Rome.

Great Northern Railway (Great Britain)

Great Northern RailwayGNRGreat Northern
Before 1857 the MR used the lines of the L&NWR for trains into the capital; subsequently the company's Leicester and Hitchin Railway gave access to London via the Great Northern Railway (GNR).

North London Railway

NLRNorth LondonE&WID&BJR
A large goods station was constructed between 1862 and 1865, sited to the west of the King's Cross coal depot between the North London Railway and the Regent's Canal.

Charles Somers-Cocks, 3rd Earl Somers

Charles Somers Somers-Cocks, 3rd Earl SomersEarl SomersThe Earl Somers
The company purchased the eastern section of land on the road's north side owned by Earl Somers.

Brewers of Burton

beer from BurtonBenjamin Printonbreweries in Burton
Instead, due to the value of the land in such a location the lower area was used for freight, in particular beer from Burton.

Radius of curvature

radii of curvaturecurve radiusradius
The span width, from wall to wall was 245 ft, with a rib every 29 ft The arch was a slightly pointed design, with a reduced radius of curvature at the springing points.

Wrought iron

wrought-ironbar ironiron
The materials used were wrought iron framework of lattice design, with glass covering the middle half and timber (inside)/slate (outside) covering the outer quarters.

Latticework

latticelatticedframework
The materials used were wrought iron framework of lattice design, with glass covering the middle half and timber (inside)/slate (outside) covering the outer quarters.

Finial

finialsapex stonesHip-knob
The two end screens were glazed in a vertical rectangular grid pattern with decorative timber cladding around the edge and wrought iron finials around the outer edge.

Metropolitan Railway

MetropolitanMetropolitan and St John's Wood RailwayMetropolitan Railway Company
Local services began running to the Metropolitan Railway junction underneath the terminus on 13 July 1868.

Great Eastern Railway

GERGreat EasternGreat Eastern Line
As well as Midland services, the Great Eastern Railway (GER) used St Pancras as a "West End" terminus for trains to,, between 1870 and 1917.

West End of London

West EndLondon's West EndWest London
As well as Midland services, the Great Eastern Railway (GER) used St Pancras as a "West End" terminus for trains to,, between 1870 and 1917.

London, Tilbury and Southend Railway

London, Tilbury & Southend RailwayLondon Tilbury and Southend RailwayThomas Whitelegg
The London, Tilbury and Southend Railway (LTSR) began offering boat train services from St Pancras from 9 July 1894, following the opening of the Tottenham and Forest Gate Railway.

Boat train

The London, Tilbury and Southend Railway (LTSR) began offering boat train services from St Pancras from 9 July 1894, following the opening of the Tottenham and Forest Gate Railway.

Tottenham and Forest Gate Railway

Tottenham & Forest Gate Railway
The London, Tilbury and Southend Railway (LTSR) began offering boat train services from St Pancras from 9 July 1894, following the opening of the Tottenham and Forest Gate Railway.

Tilbury Riverside railway station

TilburyTilbury RiversideTilbury station
The trains ran from St Pancras to Tilbury via and.

Port of Tilbury

Tilbury DocksTilburyTilbury Dock
Tilbury Docks then provided a connection to Australia and Scandinavia.

Railways Act 1921

Grouping1923 GroupingGrouped
The Railways Act of 1921 forced the merger of the Midland with the London and North Western Railway (L&NWR) into the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS), and the LMS adopted the LNWR's (the "Premier Line") Euston station as its principal London terminus.

London and North Western Railway

LNWRLondon & North Western RailwayL&NWR
The Railways Act of 1921 forced the merger of the Midland with the London and North Western Railway (L&NWR) into the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS), and the LMS adopted the LNWR's (the "Premier Line") Euston station as its principal London terminus.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
During World War II, bombing inflicted damage on the train shed, which was only partially reglazed after the war.

British Rail

British RailwaysBRnationalisation
The Midland Grand Hotel was closed in 1935, and the building was subsequently used as offices for British Railways.

West Coast Main Line

West CoastWCMLwest coast railway line
From 1960 to 1966, electrification work on the West Coast Main Line between London and Manchester saw a new Midland Pullman from Manchester to St Pancras.

Poet laureate

court poetPoets Laureatepoeta laureatus
These attempts provoked strong and successful opposition, with the campaign led by the later Poet Laureate, John Betjeman.

Private Eye

Neasden F.C.Baldy" PevsnerDave Spart
In 1978, a Private Eye piece said that British Rail really wanted to demolish St Pancras but were opposed by "a lot of long-haired sentimentalists" and "faceless bureaucrats" and praised the office blocks that replaced the Euston Arch.

Network SouthEast

LSENetwork SouthEast (Original)NSE
After the sectorisation of British Rail in 1986, main-line services to the East Midlands were provided by the InterCity sector, with suburban services to St Albans, Luton and Bedford by Network SouthEast.