St Paul's Cathedral

St. Paul's CathedralSt PaulSt Paul’s CathedralSt. PaulSt Pauls CathedralSt Paul's Cathedral, LondonSaint Paul's CathedralSt. Paul’s CathedralSt Paul's ChurchyardSt. Paul's Churchyard
St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London.wikipedia
2,463 Related Articles

Old St Paul's Cathedral

St Paul's CathedralSt PaulOld St. Paul's Cathedral
The cathedral building largely destroyed in the Great Fire, now often referred to as Old St Paul's Cathedral, was a central focus for medieval and early modern London, including Paul's walk and St. Paul's Churchyard being the site of St. Paul's Cross.
Old St Paul's Cathedral was the cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral.

Ludgate Hill

Ludgate StreetLudgateLudgate-Street
It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London and is a Grade I listed building.
It is the site of St. Paul's Cathedral, traditionally said to have been the site of a Roman temple of the goddess Diana.

Christopher Wren

Sir Christopher WrenWrenWren-Gibbs
The present cathedral, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren.
He was accorded responsibility for rebuilding 52 churches in the City of London after the Great Fire in 1666, including what is regarded as his masterpiece, St Paul's Cathedral, on Ludgate Hill, completed in 1710.

Death and funeral of Margaret Thatcher

funeral of Margaret Thatcherdeath of Margaret Thatcherdeath
Services held at St Paul's have included the funerals of Admiral Nelson, the Duke of Wellington, Sir Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher; jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer; the launch of the Festival of Britain; and the thanksgiving services for the Silver, Golden and Diamond Jubilees and the 80th and 90th birthdays of Queen Elizabeth II.
The funeral, including a formal procession through Central London, followed by a church service at St Paul's Cathedral, cost around £3.6 million including £3.1 million for security.

Wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer

Wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana SpencerweddingWedding of Charles, Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer
Services held at St Paul's have included the funerals of Admiral Nelson, the Duke of Wellington, Sir Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher; jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer; the launch of the Festival of Britain; and the thanksgiving services for the Silver, Golden and Diamond Jubilees and the 80th and 90th birthdays of Queen Elizabeth II.
The wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer took place on Wednesday 29 July 1981 at St Paul's Cathedral in London, United Kingdom.

Diocese of London

Londonsee of LondonLondon Diocesan Board for Schools
St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London.
It includes the City of London in which lies its cathedral, St Paul's, and also encompasses Spelthorne which is in Middlesex but part of Surrey County Council.

Bishop of London

LondonBishops of LondonList of bishops of London
St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London.
The see is in the City of London where the seat is St Paul's Cathedral which was founded as a cathedral in 604 and was rebuilt from 1675 following the Great Fire of London (1666).

City of London

CityLondonthe City
It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London and is a Grade I listed building.
A Folkmoot, for the whole of the City held at the outdoor cross of St Paul's Cathedral, was formerly also held.

List of largest church buildings

List of largest church buildings in the worldin the world by arealargest church in the world
St Paul's is the second-largest church building in area in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.

English Baroque

BaroqueEnglishEnglish baroque architecture
The present cathedral, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren.
His most ambitious work was St Paul's Cathedral (1675–1711), which bears comparison with the most effulgent domed churches of Italy and France.

Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II

Silver JubileeQueen's Silver JubileeSilver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II
Services held at St Paul's have included the funerals of Admiral Nelson, the Duke of Wellington, Sir Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher; jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer; the launch of the Festival of Britain; and the thanksgiving services for the Silver, Golden and Diamond Jubilees and the 80th and 90th birthdays of Queen Elizabeth II.
On 7 June, crowds lined the route of the procession to St Paul's Cathedral, where the royal family attended a Service of Thanksgiving alongside many world leaders, including United States President Jimmy Carter, and Prime Minister James Callaghan as well as all of the living former Prime Ministers (Harold Macmillan, The Lord Home of the Hirsel, Sir Harold Wilson and Edward Heath).

Lincoln Cathedral

LincolnCathedralCathedral of Lincoln
During the later Medieval period St Paul's was exceeded in length only by the Abbey Church of Cluny and in the height of its spire only by Lincoln Cathedral and St. Mary's Church, Stralsund.
The cathedral is the fourth largest in the UK (in floor area) at around 5000 m2, after Liverpool, St Paul's and York Minster.

Liverpool Cathedral

Liverpool Anglican CathedralAnglican CathedralLiverpool's Anglican Cathedral
St Paul's is the second-largest church building in area in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.
For architects, the competition was an important event; not only was it for one of the largest building projects of its time, but it was only the third opportunity to build an Anglican cathedral in England since the Reformation in the 16th century (St Paul's Cathedral being the first, rebuilt from scratch after the Great Fire of London in 1666, and Truro Cathedral being the second, begun in the 19th century).

List of Christopher Wren churches in London

Wren churches50 City churches52 churches
More than 50 City churches are attributable to Wren.
Wren's office was commissioned to build 51 replacement churches and St Paul's Cathedral.

Paul's walk

PaulPaul's walker
The cathedral building largely destroyed in the Great Fire, now often referred to as Old St Paul's Cathedral, was a central focus for medieval and early modern London, including Paul's walk and St. Paul's Churchyard being the site of St. Paul's Cross.
The cathedral and its surrounding St. Paul's Churchyard was a centre of the booksellers' trade, a venue for sellers of pamphlets, proclamations, and books.

St Paul's Cross

Paul's CrossSt. Paul's Crosscross in St Paul's churchyard
The cathedral building largely destroyed in the Great Fire, now often referred to as Old St Paul's Cathedral, was a central focus for medieval and early modern London, including Paul's walk and St. Paul's Churchyard being the site of St. Paul's Cross.
The pulpit stood in 'the Cross yard', the open space on the north-east side of St. Paul's Churchyard, adjacent to the row of buildings that would become the home of London's publishing and book-selling trade.

Inigo Jones

Indigo JonesJonesJonesian
In the 1630s a west front was added to the building by England's first classical architect, Inigo Jones.
He did not approach the architectural profession in the traditional way, namely either by rising up from a craft or through early exposure to the Office of Works, although there is evidence that Christopher Wren obtained information that recorded Jones as an apprentice joiner in St Paul's Churchyard.

Robert Davies (British Army officer)

Robert DaviesRobert Davies (GC)
On 12 September 1940 a time-delayed bomb that had struck the cathedral was successfully defused and removed by a bomb disposal detachment of Royal Engineers under the command of Temporary Lieutenant Robert Davies.
Robert John Davies, GC (3 October 1900 – 27 September 1975) was a Royal Engineers officer who was awarded the George Cross (GC) for the heroism he displayed in defusing a bomb which threatened to destroy St Paul's Cathedral on 12 September 1940.

Occupy London

London GAoccupation of the London Stock ExchangeOccupy
In October 2011 an anti-capitalism Occupy London encampment was established in front of the cathedral, after failing to gain access to the London Stock Exchange at Paternoster Square nearby.
Instead, a camp was set up nearby next to St Paul's Cathedral.

Andrew Carwood

The Director of Music is Andrew Carwood.
Andrew Carwood (born 30 April 1965) is the Director of Music at St Paul's Cathedral in London and director of his own group, The Cardinall's Musick.

Early fires of London

early fire of Londonfire in 1087The Great Fire of 1135
The cathedral was burnt, with much of the city, in a fire in 1087, as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
St Paul's Cathedral was the most significant building to be destroyed in this blaze, which also damaged the Palatine tower built by William the Conqueror on the banks of the River Fleet so badly that the remains had to be pulled down.

Queen Victoria

VictoriaVictoria of the United KingdomDiamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria
Services held at St Paul's have included the funerals of Admiral Nelson, the Duke of Wellington, Sir Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher; jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer; the launch of the Festival of Britain; and the thanksgiving services for the Silver, Golden and Diamond Jubilees and the 80th and 90th birthdays of Queen Elizabeth II.
Mother and son attended a public parade through London and a grand service of thanksgiving in St Paul's Cathedral on 27 February 1872, and republican feeling subsided.

Charles Groves

Sir Charles GrovesCharles Barnard GrovesGroves
Many distinguished musicians have been organists, choir masters and choristers at St Paul's Cathedral, including the composers John Redford, Thomas Morley, John Blow, Jeremiah Clarke, Maurice Greene and John Stainer, while well-known performers have included Alfred Deller, John Shirley-Quirk and Anthony Way as well as the conductors Charles Groves and Paul Hillier and the poet Walter de la Mare.
He was a pupil at St Paul's Cathedral School (where a house is now named after him), singing in the Cathedral choir and, from the age of 13, studying the piano and organ.

John Stainer

Sir John StainerStainerStainer, John
Many distinguished musicians have been organists, choir masters and choristers at St Paul's Cathedral, including the composers John Redford, Thomas Morley, John Blow, Jeremiah Clarke, Maurice Greene and John Stainer, while well-known performers have included Alfred Deller, John Shirley-Quirk and Anthony Way as well as the conductors Charles Groves and Paul Hillier and the poet Walter de la Mare.
He became a chorister at St Paul's Cathedral when aged ten and was appointed to the position of organist at St Michael's College, Tenbury at the age of sixteen.

Cathedral

cathedralscathedral churchproto-cathedral
St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London.
The precentor presides in the dean's absence, and occupies the corresponding stall on the north side, although there are exceptions to this rule, where, as at St Paul's, the archdeacon of the cathedral city ranks second and occupies what is usually the precentor's stall.