Stable belt

gymnastic beltbeltpistol beltRegimental belt
A stable belt is an item of uniform used in the armed forces of Denmark, the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth countries.wikipedia
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Royal Regiment of Scotland

The Royal Regiment of Scotland3rd Battalion, The Black WatchGolden Highlanders
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There is however a common regimental cap badge, tactical recognition flash (TRF), tartan, stable belt and Glengarry headdress but distinctively coloured hackles are also worn by each separate battalion on the Tam o' Shanter headdress to maintain their individual identity and the pipes and drums of each battalion continue to wear the ceremonial uniforms and tartans of their former regiments.

Uniforms of the Royal Air Force

No.2 dressNo.2 RAF uniformsNumber One Uniform
In the Royal Air Force, it is worn with service working dress (No. 2 dress) either covering the top of the trousers (or skirt) and the lower part of the shirt or through the belt loops if they have been specially designed to accommodate the belt's width.
The RAF stable belt may be worn with all forms of service working dress.

Regiment

regimentsregimentalregimental system
Today, every regiment and corps of the British Army has its own stable belt, often very colourful.
The aspects that an administrative regiment might have in common include a symbolic colonel-in-chief (often a member of the royal family), a colonel of the regiment or "honorary colonel" who protects the traditions and interests of the regimental family and insists on the maintenance of high standards, battle honours (honours earned by one unit of an administrative regiment are credited to the regiment), ceremonial uniforms, cap badges, peculiarities of insignia, stable belts, and regimental marches and songs.

Military Firefighters Corps

Fire DepartmentFirefighters
It is one of the most traditional items of the uniforms of the Military Firefighters Corps; which is used with few modifications, since 1887.
The Gymnastic belt (cinto ginástico) is one of the essential elements of the uniforms of the Military Firefighters Corps; which has been used with few modifications, since 1887.

Guard Hussar Regiment (Denmark)

Guard Hussar RegimentGardehusarregimentetGuard Hussars
The Danish Defense's close cooperation with the British Army of the Rhine in the 1950s created the interest in a similar belt, for the Guard Hussar Regiment, which was introduced in 1968.

Corps

army corpsarmyadministrative corps
Today, every regiment and corps of the British Army has its own stable belt, often very colourful.
An administrative corps therefore has its own cap badge, stable belt, and other insignia and traditions.

Uniforms of the British Army

British ArmyDressfull dress
It is worn around the waist and when worn with Combat Soldier 95 it is worn through the trouser belt loops.
Some Regiments and Corps wear a stable belt in No 8 dress whilst others restrict its use to Nos 13 and 14 Dress.

Officers' Training Corps

OTCOfficer Training CorpsUOTC
colspan=2 width="25%" |'''Aberdeen Universities Officers Training Corps
Each UOTC is effectively an independent regiment, with its own cap badge, its own stable belt, and its own customs and traditions.

Honourable Artillery Company

HAC11th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery (Honourable Artillery Company)13th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery (Honourable Artillery Company)
|colspan=2 width="25%" |'''Honourable Artillery Company
The Corps of Drums. Inherited from the infantry battalion and still wearing the grenade beret badge, Foot Guards belt, beret badge backing and tactical recognition flash. As with an infantry battalion corps of drums, the drummers are 'soldiers first' and regularly deploy soldiers on operations as well as fulfilling their ceremonial role. The Corps of Drums forms part of HQ Squadron and is a separate entity from the Band, who are primarily musicians. They provide personnel for A Battery whilst still maintaining their ceremonial drumming role.

Royal Danish Army

Danish ArmyArmyDanish
The Danish Army, Home Guard, and Air Force all use stable belts.
Each regiment and corps has distinctive insignia, such as a cap badge, berets, Formation patchs or stable belt.

Special Air Service

SAS22 Special Air Service RegimentBritish SAS
Originates from belt worn by the British Special Air Service.
Its stable belt is a shade of blue similar to the blue stripe on the No 1 dress uniform.

Army Cadet Force

Army CadetsACFArmy Cadet
Some battalions or Counties are affiliated with a certain Regiment or Corps within the British Army, and wear their insignia including cap badge, colour of beret and stable belt subject to individual County/Area regulations.

Queen's Own Yeomanry

The Queen's Own YeomanryQueen's Own Lowland YeomanryQueen's Own Yorkshire Yeomanry
The Regimental Stable Belt or shoulder flashes are worn to show a soldier or officer is serving with the QOY in various forms of dress.

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
Today, every regiment and corps of the British Army has its own stable belt, often very colourful. In the British Army or Royal Marines, when worn with barrack dress, the belt is placed either in the belt loops of trousers or a skirt or over a jersey.
Each regiment and corps has distinctive insignia, such as a cap badge, beret, tactical recognition flash or stable belt.

Belt (clothing)

beltbeltsleather belt
A stable belt is a wide webbing belt, usually a single solid colour or horizontally striped in two or more different colours.
Stable belt

Scottish Yeomanry

colspan=2 width="25%" |'''Scottish Yeomanry
The regimental stable belt which was adopted was a reversed version of the Ayrshire Yeomanry belt.

2nd East Anglian Regiment

2nd East Anglian Regiment (Duchess of Gloucester's Own Royal Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire)2nd East Anglian Regiment (Duchess of Gloucester's Own Lincoln and Northamptonshire)Second East Anglian Regiment
colspan=2 width="25%" |'''2nd East Anglian Regiment
All battalions of the East Anglian Brigade wore a common cap badge, with each unit having a distinctive collar badge, coloured lanyard and stable belt.

3rd East Anglian Regiment

3rd East Anglian Regiment (16th/44th Foot)3rd East Anglisn Regiment (16th/44th Foot)Third East Anglian Regiment
colspan=2 width="25%" |'''3rd East Anglian Regiment
The regiment also had a distinctive stable belt, black with purple stripes edged in amber, a combination of those of the two constituents.

Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry

Wiltshire Yeomanry2/1st Royal Wiltshire YeomanryThe Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry (Prince of Wales's Own)
colspan=2 width="25%" |'''Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry
The regimental colours of green, red and yellow, which appear on the regimental tie and Stable belt, were decided on in the late 19th century.

Northamptonshire Regiment

Northamptonshire58th RegimentThe Northamptonshire Regiment
colspan=2 width="25%" |'''Northamptonshire Regiment
The regimental stable belt consisted of equal stripes of black, buff and sky blue.

Royal Observer Corps

Observer CorpsNo 17 Group Royal Observer Corps North WalesROC
colspan=2 width="25%" |'''Royal Observer Corps
ROC stable belts incorporating the colours of the ROC Medal ribbon were authorised by the Commandant ROC and introduced in 1985 for male observers.

Sherwood Foresters

Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)The Sherwood ForestersNottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment
colspan=2 width="25%" |'''Sherwood Foresters
The Sherwood Foresters' stable belt continues to be used by the East Midlands Universities Officer Training Corps.

Army Fire Service

Under both corps it was semi-autonomous and had its own insignia, such as cap badge and stable belt.

Military

armed forcesdefensedefence
A stable belt is an item of uniform used in the armed forces of Denmark, the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth countries.