Staff of office

staffrodstaffs of officestaves of officeCeremonial rodstaff-of-officestaffswalking sticks
A staff of office is a staff, the carrying of which often denotes an official's position, a social rank or a degree of social prestige.wikipedia
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Walking stick

canecaneswalkingstick
A gold- or silver-topped cane can express social standing (or dandyism).
Various staffs of office derived from walking sticks or staffs are used by both western and eastern Christian churches.

Conducting

conductorconductedconductors
Orchestral conductors have in their batons symbols of authority as well as tools of their trade.
In the Christian church, the person giving these symbols held a staff to signify his role, and it seems that as music became rhythmically more complex, the staff was moved up and down to indicate the beat, acting as an early form of baton.

Wand

magic wandstaffmagical wand
Church sidesmen bear sticks or rods or wands of office; bishops may use a crozier or crook.
Compare in this context the function of the ceremonial mace, the scepter, and the staff of office.

Crosier

crozierpastoral staffstaff
Church sidesmen bear sticks or rods or wands of office; bishops may use a crozier or crook.
Many other types of the staff of office were found in later periods, some continuing to the modern day in ceremonial contexts.

Sceptre

scepterImperial Sceptrescepters
Monarchs often have a sceptre signifying their office, and field-marshals are traditionally given a short thick baton in several countries.
A sceptre (British English) or scepter (American English) is a staff or wand held in the hand by a ruling monarch as an item of royal or imperial insignia.

Baton (military)

batonmarshal's batonbatons
Monarchs often have a sceptre signifying their office, and field-marshals are traditionally given a short thick baton in several countries.
Unlike a staff of office, a baton is not rested on the ground.

Ceremonial weapon

ceremonial swordceremonialceremonial axes

Ceremonial mace

macemacesparliamentary mace
Some corporate bodies such as local councils and livery companies use maces.

Official

government officialpublic officialfunctionary
A staff of office is a staff, the carrying of which often denotes an official's position, a social rank or a degree of social prestige.

Social class

classsocial classesclasses
A staff of office is a staff, the carrying of which often denotes an official's position, a social rank or a degree of social prestige.

Gold

Aunative goldgold dust
A gold- or silver-topped cane can express social standing (or dandyism).

Silver

Agsilver orenative silver
A gold- or silver-topped cane can express social standing (or dandyism).

Dandy

dandiesdandyismdandified
A gold- or silver-topped cane can express social standing (or dandyism).

Teacher

educatorschoolteacherschool teacher
Teachers or prefects in schools traditionally carried less elaborate canes which marked their right (and potential threat) to administer canings, and military officers carry a residual threat of physical punishment in their swagger sticks.

Prefect

prefectsPrefeitopraefectus
Teachers or prefects in schools traditionally carried less elaborate canes which marked their right (and potential threat) to administer canings, and military officers carry a residual threat of physical punishment in their swagger sticks.

Caning

canedcanecanes
Teachers or prefects in schools traditionally carried less elaborate canes which marked their right (and potential threat) to administer canings, and military officers carry a residual threat of physical punishment in their swagger sticks.

Swagger stick

officer's canepace sticksvitis
Teachers or prefects in schools traditionally carried less elaborate canes which marked their right (and potential threat) to administer canings, and military officers carry a residual threat of physical punishment in their swagger sticks.

Orchestra

symphony orchestraorchestralchamber orchestra
Orchestral conductors have in their batons symbols of authority as well as tools of their trade.

Baton (conducting)

batonbatonsconductor's baton
Orchestral conductors have in their batons symbols of authority as well as tools of their trade.

Sidesperson

sidesmensidesmanAssistant Churchwardens
Church sidesmen bear sticks or rods or wands of office; bishops may use a crozier or crook.

Cylinder

cylindricalcylindersrod
Church sidesmen bear sticks or rods or wands of office; bishops may use a crozier or crook.

Eastern Orthodox Church

Eastern OrthodoxOrthodoxOrthodox Church
In the Eastern Orthodox Church and some of the Oriental Orthodox Churches an ecclesiastical walking stick is used by bishops, archimandrites and hegumens (abbots) when walking outside.

Oriental Orthodox Churches

Oriental OrthodoxOriental OrthodoxyOriental Orthodox Church
In the Eastern Orthodox Church and some of the Oriental Orthodox Churches an ecclesiastical walking stick is used by bishops, archimandrites and hegumens (abbots) when walking outside.

Bishop

episcopateepiscopal consecrationbishops
In the Eastern Orthodox Church and some of the Oriental Orthodox Churches an ecclesiastical walking stick is used by bishops, archimandrites and hegumens (abbots) when walking outside.

Archimandrite

archmandriteArchimandritArchimandrites
In the Eastern Orthodox Church and some of the Oriental Orthodox Churches an ecclesiastical walking stick is used by bishops, archimandrites and hegumens (abbots) when walking outside.