Stan Musial

MusialStan "The Man" MusialStan The ManStanley Frank Musial
Stanley Frank Musial (born Stanisław Franciszek Musiał; November 21, 1920 – January 19, 2013), nicknamed Stan the Man, was an American baseball outfielder and first baseman.wikipedia
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St. Louis Cardinals

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He spent 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) playing for the St. Louis Cardinals, from 1941 to 1944 and 1946 to 1963.
Notable Cardinals achievements include manager/owner Branch Rickey's invention of the farm system, Rogers Hornsby's two batting Triple Crowns, Dizzy Dean's 30-win season in 1934, Stan Musial's 17 MLB and 29 NL records, Bob Gibson's 1.12 earned run average (ERA) in 1968, Whitey Herzog's Whiteyball, Mark McGwire's single-season home run record in 1998, and the 2011 championship team's unprecedented comebacks.

1969 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

1969
Widely considered to be one of the greatest and most consistent hitters in baseball history, Musial was a first-ballot inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969, and was also selected to the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 2014.
The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted once by mail to select from recent major league players and elected two, Roy Campanella and Stan Musial.

List of Major League Baseball career hits leaders

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His 6,134 total bases remained a major league record until surpassed by Hank Aaron, and his hit total still ranks fourth all-time, and is the highest by any player who spent his career with only one team.

Hank Aaron

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His 6,134 total bases remained a major league record until surpassed by Hank Aaron, and his hit total still ranks fourth all-time, and is the highest by any player who spent his career with only one team. He also shares the major league record for the most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron and Willie Mays.
Aaron holds the record for the most seasons as an All-Star and the most All-Star Game selections (25), and is tied with Willie Mays and Stan Musial for the most All-Star Games played (24).

Willie Mays

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He also shares the major league record for the most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron and Willie Mays.
Mays shares the record of most All-Star Games played with 24, with Hank Aaron and Stan Musial.

Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award

Most Valuable PlayerMVPMost Valuable Player Award
A seven-time batting champion with identical totals of 1,815 hits at home and 1,815 hits on the road, he was named the National League's (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) three times and led St. Louis to three World Series championships.
Hank Greenberg, Stan Musial, Alex Rodriguez, and Robin Yount have won at different positions, while Rodriguez is the only player who has won the award with two different teams at two different positions.

Ken Griffey Jr.

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Musial also played one season on the newly revived Donora High School baseball team, where one of his teammates was Buddy Griffey, father of MLB player Ken Griffey Sr. and grandfather to Ken Griffey Jr. Baseball statistician Bill James described the younger Griffey, in comparison to Musial, as "the second-best left-handed hitting, left-handed throwing outfielder ever born in Donora, Pennsylvania, on November 21."
(He shares a birthday with another Donora native and Hall-of-Famer, Stan Musial.) His family moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where his father, Ken Griffey Sr., played for the Cincinnati Reds, when Ken Jr. was six years old.

Daytona Beach Islanders

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Musial spent the 1940 season with the Cardinals' other Class D team, the Daytona Beach Islanders, where he developed a lifelong friendship with manager Dickie Kerr.
While the Islanders were an affiliate of the Cardinals, Stan Musial played for them under manager Dickey Kerr.

1944 World Series

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Musial won his second World Series championship in 1944, then missed the entire 1945 season while serving in the Navy.
Stan Musial of the Cardinals was one.

Donora, Pennsylvania

Donora
Musial was born in Donora, Pennsylvania, where he frequently played baseball informally or in organized settings, and eventually played on the baseball team at Donora High School.
"In three days, 20 people died... After the inversion lifted, another 50 died, including Lukasz Musial, the father of baseball great Stan Musial. Hundreds more finished the rest of their lives with damaged lungs and hearts."

Double (baseball)

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Musial batted .331 over the course of his career and set National League (NL) records for career hits (3,630), runs batted in (1,951), games played (3,026), at bats (10,972), runs scored (1,949) and doubles (725).
Only five players in Major League history have reached 50 or more doubles in a season at least three times: Tris Speaker (1912, 1920–21, 1923, 1926), Paul Waner (1928, 1932, 1936), Stan Musial (1944, 1946, 1953), Brian Roberts (2004, 2008–09) and Albert Pujols (2003–04, 2012).

Outfielder

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Stanley Frank Musial (born Stanisław Franciszek Musiał; November 21, 1920 – January 19, 2013), nicknamed Stan the Man, was an American baseball outfielder and first baseman.
Outfielders named to the MLB All-Century Team are Hank Aaron, Ty Cobb, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, Stan Musial, Pete Rose, Babe Ruth, Ted Williams and Ken Griffey Jr.

Major League Baseball

MLBMajor LeagueMajor Leagues
He spent 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) playing for the St. Louis Cardinals, from 1941 to 1944 and 1946 to 1963.
The war interrupted the careers of stars including Stan Musial, Bob Feller, Ted Williams, and Joe DiMaggio, but baseball clubs continued to field their teams.

Ken Griffey Sr.

Ken Griffey, Sr.Ken GriffeyKen Griffey Sr
Musial also played one season on the newly revived Donora High School baseball team, where one of his teammates was Buddy Griffey, father of MLB player Ken Griffey Sr. and grandfather to Ken Griffey Jr. Baseball statistician Bill James described the younger Griffey, in comparison to Musial, as "the second-best left-handed hitting, left-handed throwing outfielder ever born in Donora, Pennsylvania, on November 21."
Griffey was raised by a single mother of six; his father Buddy—a high school teammate of another Hall of Fame outfielder, Stan Musial—left the family when he was 2 years old.

Lou Brock

Ironically, in 1964, the season following his retirement, the Cardinals went on to defeat the New York Yankees in an epic 7-game clash, for St. Louis' first World Series championship in nearly two decades (a team which included future Hall of Famer Lou Brock performing what would have likely been Musial's left field duties).
Cardinals general manager Bing Devine specifically sought Brock at the insistence of Cardinals' manager Johnny Keane to increase team speed and solidify the Cardinals' lineup, which was struggling after the retirement of left fielder Stan Musial in 1963.

1942 World Series

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In his first full season, 1942, the Cardinals won the World Series.
Another single loaded the bases, bringing Stan Musial to the plate as the potential winning run, only to have Musial ground out to end the game as the Yankees took a 1–0 series lead with a 7–4 win.

Ollie Vanek

He was reassigned to the Class C Springfield Cardinals as a full-time outfielder, and he later credited manager Ollie Vanek for displaying confidence in his hitting ability.
He is best known as the talent-spotter who discovered future Baseball Hall of Famer Stan Musial for the St. Louis Cardinals and encouraged the team to switch Musial from his initial position, a left-handed pitcher, to the outfield — paving the way for Musial's brilliant career as a batsman.

Mel Ott

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His 475 career home runs then ranked second in NL history behind Mel Ott's total of 511.
He is one of only six National League players to spend a 20+ year career with one team (Cap Anson, Stan Musial, Willie Stargell, Tony Gwynn, and Craig Biggio being the others).

Major League Baseball All-Star Game

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He also shares the major league record for the most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron and Willie Mays.
In 1957, fans of the Cincinnati Reds stuffed the ballot box and elected 7 Reds players to start in the All-Star Game: Johnny Temple (2B), Roy McMillan (SS), Don Hoak (3B), Ed Bailey (C), Frank Robinson (LF), Gus Bell (CF), and Wally Post (RF), and the only non-Red elected to start for the National League was St. Louis Cardinals first baseman Stan Musial.

Spring training

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Musial's 1943 season started with a brief contract holdout in spring training.
Over 130 Major League Baseball Hall of Famers, including such names as Ruth, Cy Young, Cap Anson, Honus Wagner, Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker, Walter Johnson, Rogers Hornsby, Mel Ott, Dizzy Dean, Jimmie Foxx, and Stan Musial all trained in Hot Springs Spring Training.

St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum

St. Louis Cardinals Hall of FameHall of FameCardinals Hall of Fame
Widely considered to be one of the greatest and most consistent hitters in baseball history, Musial was a first-ballot inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969, and was also selected to the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 2014.

1948 St. Louis Cardinals season

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Fully recovered from his ailments, Musial recorded his 1,000th career hit on April 25, 1948.
Outfielder Stan Musial won the MVP Award this year, batting .376, with 39 home runs and 131 RBIs.

1943 St. Louis Cardinals season

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Musial's 1943 season started with a brief contract holdout in spring training.
Outfielder Stan Musial won the MVP Award this year, batting .357, with 13 home runs and 81 RBIs.

Springfield Cardinals

SpringfieldSpringfield RedbirdsDouble-A affiliate
He was reassigned to the Class C Springfield Cardinals as a full-time outfielder, and he later credited manager Ollie Vanek for displaying confidence in his hitting ability.
The greatest of these was Stan Musial, also known as Stan "The Man."

1946 St. Louis Cardinals season

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Rejoining the Cardinals under new manager Eddie Dyer, Musial posted a .388 batting average by the middle of May 1946.
First baseman Stan Musial won the MVP Award this year, batting .365, with 16 home runs and 103 RBIs.